Cheraine Stanford

Cheraine Stanford is the Content Strategy Director at WPSU, responsible for developing the station's original productions across digital, radio and television. She is also a moderator and on-camera host. For many years, Stanford was a journalist,
producer, director and writer with a career spanning print, web, TV and independent film.

Her work has garnered a George Foster Peabody Award, four Mid-Atlantic Emmy® Awards, a CINE Golden Eagle, a Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters Award and several Mid-Atlantic Emmy® nominations.

Her productions include the multi-platform projects Women in Science Profiles (WisciFiles) and Water Blues - Green Solutions, the television documentaries Holding History and As Long As We Dance, the web series Finding Your Roots: The Seedlings and The Geospatial Revolution and the multimedia project African American ChroniclesShe is the narrator of Why We Dance: The Story of THON.Stanford is the past Chair of the PBS Digital Media Advisory Council. She is an interviewer and host for the radio program Take Note and a moderator of the Penn State Forum Speaker Series. Stanford was a 2016 Next Generation Leadership Senior Editorial Fellow and a 2011 CPB/PBS Producers Academy Fellow.

Before joining WPSU, she worked on several projects with her filmmaker icon Albert Maysles at Maysles Films in Harlem, New York, including the ESPN documentary Muhammad and Larry. Stanford also served as Production Coordinator for the election road-show series for Washington Week with Gwen Ifillworking with her mentor and friend, Gwen Ifill.

While earning her Master of Fine Arts in Film and Media Arts from Temple University, Stanford served as the Assistant Director for The Maid, a short narrative film that premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. She earned a prestigious Future Faculty Fellowship and taught video production to undergraduates. In addition to creating her own work and teaching production courses to undergraduates at Temple, Stanford taught video production and media literacy to Philadelphia high school students. She has spoken at media education conferences at Harvard University and the Alliance for a Media Literate America and presented her work at conferences around the country and the world.

Stanford began her career as a reporter and staff writer for the Charlotte Observer newspaper in North Carolina. She is a cum laude graduate of Duke University and a native of Jamaica.  

Ways to Connect

MIN XIAN/WPSU

Sandra Charles is the Chief Medical Officer and Chief of Health Services for the Library of Congress, a position that combines her medical expertise with her passion for educating others. She talks with WPSU's Cheraine Stanford about her life and why she thinks we need to talk about mental health as openly as we do about cancer or diabetes.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Many young athletes getting ready to resume sports during the summer months. According to the CDC, more than 2.6 million children are treated each year for sports and recreation-related injuries. 

Safety tips for youth sports include: 

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The longer we live, the more unique our health needs become. Receiving health care that respects individuals is at the heart of Age-Friendly Care, PA, a collaborative supporting rural, medically underserved parts of Pennsylvania. It teaches the “4Ms” framework to ensure older adults are understood and cared for in ways that optimize their health and well-being.

The 4Ms are: What Matters, Mentation, Mobility, and Medications.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

It’s likely that we’ll continue to wear masks regularly to protect ourselves from COVID-19.

Here are some tips on how to properly put on and take off a mask:

Courtesy Brandon Ogbunu

Brandon Ogbunu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Brown University. He uses experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and computational biology to better understand diseases. He is interested in the interactions of epidemics, evolution, and society.

He talked with WPSU's Cheraine Stanford about his latest novel coronavirus research and the interactions between race, social justice, and COVID-19.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

 

It is never too late to start an exercise program for bone health.

With age, bone loss happens at a faster rate than bone formation, leaving bones porous, weak, and susceptible to fractures. Bone is living tissue and, like muscle, responds positively to exercise even as we age.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, over 5 million Americans live with dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease being the most common type.

Brain health is influenced by lifestyle choices. Here are some steps you can take that may lower your risk for memory and thinking problems as you age:

PATRICK MANSELL

Daryl Cameron is an assistant professor of psychology and a research associate in the Rock Ethics Institute at Penn State. His work focuses on the psychological processes involved in empathy and moral decision-making. He looks at the reasons behind people’s empathic emotions and behaviors toward others, including their responses to significant crises like the coronavirus pandemic.   

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TRANSCRIPT:   

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Your vision and hearing need protection from injury just like the rest of your body.

You can protect your eyes by wearing sunglasses when you go outside, and by wearing safety goggles when participating in activities that could result in injury, such as yard work or playing sports. For those who spend a lot of time in front of a computer screen, don’t forget to take breaks to rest your eyes.

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TRANSCRIPT: 

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, more than 88,000 adults and adolescents die each year from alcohol-related causes, making alcohol the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States.

Here are some steps you can take to help prevent alcohol-related problems:

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Spring is the perfect time to enjoy a fun road trip, but safe driving is serious business.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, distracted driving causes thousands of crashes each year, including up to 58% of teen crashes. In 2016, over 37,000 lives were lost on U.S. roads.

Here’s what you can do to practice safe driving:

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TRANSCRIPT:  

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

May is Mental Health Month. According to the World Health Organization, mental health is a state of well-being in which an individual can recognize their own abilities, cope with the normal stresses of life, work productively, and contribute to their community.

Mental and physical health influence each other and are essential to overall wellness. Here are some steps you can take to promote a mentally healthy lifestyle:

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. One in six American women has experienced an attempted or completed rape. Trauma from sexual violence left untreated has long-term health consequences.

Fortunately, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners have special training in evidence collection and working with patients who have experienced trauma, and the SAFE-T Center at Penn State provides support for sexual assault care in underserved communities through telehealth.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

It’s important to take care of your mental health and manage stress during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Symptoms of stress include fear, worry, changes in appetite or sleep, worsening of chronic health conditions, or increased use of alcohol or other substances. 

Courtesy Jodi F. Solomon Speakers Bureau

Robert Bullard has spent four decades shining a light on issues of environmental racism and fighting for environmental justice. He talks with WPSU's Cheraine Stanford about how the coronavirus pandemic is highlighting existing social inequalities and why he thinks climate and environmental justice are essential issues for the upcoming election. 

TRANSCRIPT: Cheraine Stanford:

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The past few weeks have been challenging as we continue to take precautions to slow and prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Here are some tips to help you stay connected to your family, friends, and community:

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

COVID-19 requires all of us to take precautions through “social distancing.” Social distancing means staying physically separated from other people by at least 6 feet or 2 meters.

While it's still acceptable to exercise outdoors, it's important to find outdoor spaces that aren't crowded with other people. It's also important to avoid large gatherings and to avoid traveling by public transit.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

As Covid-19 continues to spread, what are you doing  to boost your immune system? 

The National Sleep Foundation explains that when we don’t get enough sleep, our immune system is weakened and we become more susceptible to infections. Chronic sleep loss does further damage by increasing our risk for obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. 

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Handwashing continues to be an important way to prevent the spread of coronavirus and other respiratory illnesses.

The steps for effective handwashing include: 

Wet your hands with warm or cold water, turn water off, and apply soap to your hands.

Lather the soap by rubbing your hands together to include the front and back of hands and fingers.

Scrub hands and fingers for at least 20 seconds.

Courtesy Matthew Ferrari

Matthew Ferrari is an epidemiologist and associate professor of biology at Penn State who studies infectious diseases and how they spread across populations. He uses mathematical and statistical tools to understand patterns of disease incidence. He talked with WPSU's Cheraine Stanford about the new coronavirus, what we know, what we don’t and what it means for our community and our country.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Healthy living includes healthy eating. Making nutritious food choices can help you stay strong and maintain the energy you need to live a full life. Here are some tips for making better food choices when cooking at home or eating out.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Arthritis affects one out of every four adults and more than 300,000 children.

Arthritis is not just one disease. It is a collection of numerous conditions that involve joint pain or joint disease.

People with arthritis can take the following steps to help manage their condition: 

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TRANSCRIPT:

You're listening to WPSU's Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State's College of Nursing.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. The median age for a diagnosis is 66, but cancer can develop at any age. Information and education are key to prevention and early detection.

How can you reduce your risk of cancer?

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Go Red for Women is a national movement sponsored by the American Heart Association to end heart disease in women.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States.

Risk factors for heart disease include smoking, high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and diabetes.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

February is American Heart Month. In the United States, someone dies from cardiovascular disease every 38 seconds.  

What can you do to keep your heart healthy?

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

February 14th is National Donor Day. 95% of U.S. adults support organ donation, but only 58% are signed up as donors, which has resulted in an organ transplant shortage.

Anyone, regardless of age or medical history, can sign up to be a donor.

One donor can donate up to eight lifesaving organs, including a heart, liver, pancreas, 2 lungs, 2 kidneys, and intestines.

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You're listening to WPSU's Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State's College of Nursing.

February is Children's Dental Health Month.

Oral care begins even before your baby's first tooth emerges. Baby's gums should be cleaned twice daily with a moist, clean cloth to rid the gums of bacteria and sugars. The American Dental Association warns tooth decay can occur when babies are exposed to sugary drinks, put to bed with a bottle, or using shared utensils. Fluoride toothpaste can be used once the child is two years old.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The new coronavirus, which has sickened thousands and killed more than 80 people in Wuhan, China, has now been confirmed in the United States. It can cause fever, severe illness, and pneumonia. 

The CDC does not expect a large outbreak in the U.S., but they’re monitoring everyone who recently visited the now quarantined Wuhan region. 

Shih-In Ma
Cheraine Stanford / WPSU

Shih-In Ma is a social justice advocate who works to promote diversity and inclusion in Centre County. 

The State College native and Penn State alum, left a corporate career at IBM to begin a journey of spirituality, self-reflection and meditation. Her journey has taken her around the world and included spending four years in India with Amma, who's known as the hugging saint.

Shih-In Ma teaches meditation and shares opportunities for others to gain better insight and understanding of those around them.

TRANSCRIPT:

Veteran law enforcement officers Damon K. Jones and Cariol Horne are speaking out against police brutality and calling for reform.

They talked with WPSU about the challenges they have faced as minorities in the police force, their thoughts about the Black Lives Matter movement and why change is necessary.

Transcript:

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