Cheraine Stanford

Cheraine Stanford is the Content Strategy Director at WPSU, responsible for developing the station's original productions across digital, radio and television. She is also a moderator and on-camera host. For many years, Stanford was a journalist,
producer, director and writer with a career spanning print, web, TV and independent film.

Her work has garnered a George Foster Peabody Award, four Mid-Atlantic Emmy® Awards, a CINE Golden Eagle, a Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters Award and several Mid-Atlantic Emmy® nominations.

Her productions include the multi-platform projects Women in Science Profiles (WisciFiles) and Water Blues - Green Solutions, the television documentaries Holding History and As Long As We Dance, the web series Finding Your Roots: The Seedlings and The Geospatial Revolution and the multimedia project African American ChroniclesShe is the narrator of Why We Dance: The Story of THON.Stanford is the past Chair of the PBS Digital Media Advisory Council. She is an interviewer and host for the radio program Take Note and a moderator of the Penn State Forum Speaker Series. Stanford was a 2016 Next Generation Leadership Senior Editorial Fellow and a 2011 CPB/PBS Producers Academy Fellow.

Before joining WPSU, she worked on several projects with her filmmaker icon Albert Maysles at Maysles Films in Harlem, New York, including the ESPN documentary Muhammad and Larry. Stanford also served as Production Coordinator for the election road-show series for Washington Week with Gwen Ifillworking with her mentor and friend, Gwen Ifill.

While earning her Master of Fine Arts in Film and Media Arts from Temple University, Stanford served as the Assistant Director for The Maid, a short narrative film that premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. She earned a prestigious Future Faculty Fellowship and taught video production to undergraduates. In addition to creating her own work and teaching production courses to undergraduates at Temple, Stanford taught video production and media literacy to Philadelphia high school students. She has spoken at media education conferences at Harvard University and the Alliance for a Media Literate America and presented her work at conferences around the country and the world.

Stanford began her career as a reporter and staff writer for the Charlotte Observer newspaper in North Carolina. She is a cum laude graduate of Duke University and a native of Jamaica.  

Ways to Connect

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 34 million Americans, or about 10% of the population, has diabetes.  88 million Americans have pre-diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes is a serious life-long condition and can cause many complications, including kidney damage, eye issues like glaucoma or blindness, and heart complications.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer found only in men and the third most common non-skin cancer diagnosed in Americans. It is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among American men; and, the death rate is higher for Black men.

In its early stages, prostate cancer may not produce symptoms, so routine exams or specific antigen tests are needed for prevention and early detection. Prostate cancer is typically treatable if it’s caught early.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The Covid-19 pandemic has dominated the news this year, but there are other diseases that can cause widespread illness too, like influenza, measles, and mumps.

Immunizations are the best tools modern medicine has to stop infectious diseases in their tracks.  

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

“Contact tracing” is reaching out to people who may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Exposure includes being within 6 feet of someone with COVID-19 for at least 15 minutes; being around someone 48 to 72 hours before they had symptoms and through the end of the infectious period; having direct contact with infectious secretions; or, being coughed on by someone with COVID-19.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

September is National Recovery Month. It’s a time to increase awareness and understanding of mental illness and substance abuse, and to celebrate those who are recovering. 

According to the National Institute of Mental Health, more than 43 million adults in the United States suffer from a diagnosable mental illness; but, 60% do not seek treatment. And, nearly 21 million Americans have at least one addiction, but only 10% receive treatment.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.  

 

WPSU

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

For most people, staying at home has been the best health advice over the past several months. But what do you do when home isn’t a safe place?

Intimate partner violence or domestic violence impacts 1 out of every 4 women and 1 out of every 7 men in their lifetime.

Stressful situations – like a global pandemic - have been shown to increase rates of violence in the past.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

 

In 2018, there were over 2 million poisonings reported across the United States. That equals one every 15 seconds.   

WPSU

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

According to the National Psoriasis Foundation, more than 8 million Americans have Psoriasis, an autoimmune disorder that affects skin. Psoriasis is not contagious, but can reduce quality of life.  

Here are some tips to promote skin healing and calm flare ups:

Moisturize after bathing to decrease dryness, itching, redness, soreness, and scaling. 

Take a warm bath with mild soap to soothe itchy spots and remove dry skin. Pat skin dry. 

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

Being physically active is important, but the combination of high temperatures and humidity can put your body at risk for heat-related health emergencies.

The National Weather Service recommends some simple measures to take during extreme heat to reduce health risks: 

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College ofNursing. 

Summer has arrived! And higher temperatures mean the need for summertime safety.

The CDC warns the sun’s UV rays can damage skin in as little as 15 minutes. To minimize your UV exposure and skin cancer risk, avoid direct sun between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. 

If you must be outside during these hours:

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

It’s summertime! That means it’s time for backyard grilling. 

There are more grilling options now than in years past, and many of them are plant-based meat substitutes. These products are most commonly soy-, grain-, or pea-based, and can accommodate a variety of dietary restrictions and needs, including kosher, gluten free, dairy free, and egg free. 

This interview originally aired Dec. 6, 2019. 

Veteran law enforcement officers Damon K. Jones and Cariol Horne are speaking out against police brutality and calling for reform.

They talked with WPSU about the challenges they have faced as minorities in the police force, their thoughts about the Black Lives Matter movement and why change is necessary.

Transcript:

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College ofNursing. 

Many swimming pools, lakes, and beaches are open. 

While water offers children an opportunity for outdoor exercise, it is important to know that drownings are a leading cause of injury and accidental death for children ages 1 to 14.  

Children need to be well supervised around any body of water. Adults supervising children should remain vigilant and avoid distractions such as reading or using electronic devices.  

MIN XIAN/WPSU

Sandra Charles is the Chief Medical Officer and Chief of Health Services for the Library of Congress, a position that combines her medical expertise with her passion for educating others. She talks with WPSU's Cheraine Stanford about her life and why she thinks we need to talk about mental health as openly as we do about cancer or diabetes.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Many young athletes getting ready to resume sports during the summer months. According to the CDC, more than 2.6 million children are treated each year for sports and recreation-related injuries. 

Safety tips for youth sports include: 

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The longer we live, the more unique our health needs become. Receiving health care that respects individuals is at the heart of Age-Friendly Care, PA, a collaborative supporting rural, medically underserved parts of Pennsylvania. It teaches the “4Ms” framework to ensure older adults are understood and cared for in ways that optimize their health and well-being.

The 4Ms are: What Matters, Mentation, Mobility, and Medications.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

It’s likely that we’ll continue to wear masks regularly to protect ourselves from COVID-19.

Here are some tips on how to properly put on and take off a mask:

Courtesy Brandon Ogbunu

Brandon Ogbunu is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Brown University. He uses experimental evolution, mathematical modeling, and computational biology to better understand diseases. He is interested in the interactions of epidemics, evolution, and society.

He talked with WPSU's Cheraine Stanford about his latest novel coronavirus research and the interactions between race, social justice, and COVID-19.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

 

It is never too late to start an exercise program for bone health.

With age, bone loss happens at a faster rate than bone formation, leaving bones porous, weak, and susceptible to fractures. Bone is living tissue and, like muscle, responds positively to exercise even as we age.

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You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, over 5 million Americans live with dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease being the most common type.

Brain health is influenced by lifestyle choices. Here are some steps you can take that may lower your risk for memory and thinking problems as you age:

PATRICK MANSELL

Daryl Cameron is an assistant professor of psychology and a research associate in the Rock Ethics Institute at Penn State. His work focuses on the psychological processes involved in empathy and moral decision-making. He looks at the reasons behind people’s empathic emotions and behaviors toward others, including their responses to significant crises like the coronavirus pandemic.   

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TRANSCRIPT:   

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Your vision and hearing need protection from injury just like the rest of your body.

You can protect your eyes by wearing sunglasses when you go outside, and by wearing safety goggles when participating in activities that could result in injury, such as yard work or playing sports. For those who spend a lot of time in front of a computer screen, don’t forget to take breaks to rest your eyes.

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TRANSCRIPT: 

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, more than 88,000 adults and adolescents die each year from alcohol-related causes, making alcohol the third leading preventable cause of death in the United States.

Here are some steps you can take to help prevent alcohol-related problems:

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Spring is the perfect time to enjoy a fun road trip, but safe driving is serious business.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, distracted driving causes thousands of crashes each year, including up to 58% of teen crashes. In 2016, over 37,000 lives were lost on U.S. roads.

Here’s what you can do to practice safe driving:

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TRANSCRIPT:  

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

May is Mental Health Month. According to the World Health Organization, mental health is a state of well-being in which an individual can recognize their own abilities, cope with the normal stresses of life, work productively, and contribute to their community.

Mental and physical health influence each other and are essential to overall wellness. Here are some steps you can take to promote a mentally healthy lifestyle:

WPSU

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. One in six American women has experienced an attempted or completed rape. Trauma from sexual violence left untreated has long-term health consequences.

Fortunately, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners have special training in evidence collection and working with patients who have experienced trauma, and the SAFE-T Center at Penn State provides support for sexual assault care in underserved communities through telehealth.

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TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

It’s important to take care of your mental health and manage stress during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Symptoms of stress include fear, worry, changes in appetite or sleep, worsening of chronic health conditions, or increased use of alcohol or other substances. 

Courtesy Jodi F. Solomon Speakers Bureau

Robert Bullard has spent four decades shining a light on issues of environmental racism and fighting for environmental justice. He talks with WPSU's Cheraine Stanford about how the coronavirus pandemic is highlighting existing social inequalities and why he thinks climate and environmental justice are essential issues for the upcoming election. 

TRANSCRIPT: Cheraine Stanford:

WPSU

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The past few weeks have been challenging as we continue to take precautions to slow and prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Here are some tips to help you stay connected to your family, friends, and community:

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