Cheraine Stanford

Cheraine Stanford is the Content Strategy Director at WPSU, responsible for developing the station's original productions across digital, radio and television. She is also a moderator and on-camera host. For many years, Stanford was a journalist, producer, director and writer with a career spanning print, web, TV and independent film.

Her work has garnered a George Foster Peabody Award, four Mid-Atlantic Emmy® Awards, a CINE Golden Eagle, a Pennsylvania Association of Broadcasters Award and several Mid-Atlantic Emmy® nominations.

Her productions include the multi-platform projects Women in Science Profiles (WisciFiles) and Water Blues - Green Solutions, the television documentaries Holding History and As Long As We Dance, the web series Finding Your Roots: The Seedlings and The Geospatial Revolution and the multimedia project African American ChroniclesShe is the narrator of Why We Dance: The Story of THON.Stanford is the past Chair of the PBS Digital Media Advisory Council. She is an interviewer and host for the radio program Take Note and a moderator of the Penn State Forum Speaker Series. Stanford was a 2016 Next Generation Leadership Senior Editorial Fellow and a 2011 CPB/PBS Producers Academy Fellow.

Before joining WPSU, she worked on several projects with her filmmaker icon Albert Maysles at Maysles Films in Harlem, New York, including the ESPN documentary Muhammad and Larry. Stanford also served as Production Coordinator for the election road-show series for Washington Week with Gwen Ifillworking with her mentor and friend, Gwen Ifill.

While earning her Master of Fine Arts in Film and Media Arts from Temple University, Stanford served as the Assistant Director for The Maid, a short narrative film that premiered at the 2008 Cannes Film Festival. She earned a prestigious Future Faculty Fellowship and taught video production to undergraduates. In addition to creating her own work and teaching production courses to undergraduates at Temple, Stanford taught video production and media literacy to Philadelphia high school students. She has spoken at media education conferences at Harvard University and the Alliance for a Media Literate America and presented her work at conferences around the country and the world.

Stanford began her career as a reporter and staff writer for the Charlotte Observer newspaper in North Carolina. She is a cum laude graduate of Duke University and a native of Jamaica.  

Ways to Connect

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

World Tuberculosis Day is in March. It’s a time to raise public awareness about a deadly contagious disease that’s still prevalent in many countries, including the United States. 

Tuberculosis is a bacterial disease spread through droplets in the air. It can affect the brain, bones, and lungs. If left untreated, TB may be fatal. Symptoms include night sweats, coughing up blood, fever, and malaise.

Judith "Judy" Heumann is an activist, author, wife, and public speaker who has spent her lifetime fighting for the rights of people with disabilities. Her advocacy began at an early age, inspired in part by the ways that her mother fought to ensure that she had access to education and opportunities as a child.

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.  

The ongoing coronavirus pandemic underscores the challenges of communicating factual health information. As our understanding of the virus evolves, so does the guidance for keeping ourselves COVID-free.

Health-related messages are most successful when they include a call to action based on people’s beliefs about a health threat, when people perceive the action to reduce the threat as effective, and when people feel they can carry out that action.

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Many people are working or attending school from home during the pandemic. Sitting for extended periods of time in spaces that aren’t designed for office work can lead to pain in the neck, shoulders, and back.

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The COVID-19 pandemic is entering its second year of impacting all our lives. It's perfectly normal to feel fatigued by the extended disruption to normal life activities.

Pandemic fatigue can be helped by establishing daily routines to support your health. This includes regular outdoor exercise such as visiting a local park for a walk, hike, or run; getting a good night's sleep; and balancing work and personal time.

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health, in cooperation with local health care systems, has started distributing the much-anticipated COVID-19 vaccine.

Experts believe the vaccine may help keep people from getting seriously ill, even if they get COVID-19.

Getting vaccinated may also help protect those around you, especially those who may be at increased risk for severe illness from COVID-19. 

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

January is Radon Action Month. Radon is an invisible, odorless gas that can seep into homes and other buildings via cracks in concrete, floors, or siding.

Radon is produced by the natural breakdown of uranium in soil, rocks and water. Exposure to radon can cause lung damage and cancer. The best way to know if there is radon in your home or building is to have it tested by a professional in your area. In addition, you can purchase a do-it-yourself radon detection kit at a local hardware store.

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Carbon monoxide is an odorless and tasteless gas that’s produced when fuel is burned in gas stoves, fireplaces, furnaces, or vehicles. The gas can build up in closed areas and poison people and animals who breathe in the vapor.  

Carbon monoxide poisoning can lead to headaches, weakness, nausea and vomiting, dizziness, confusion, and even death.  

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

It’s likely that we’ll continue to wear masks regularly to protect ourselves from COVID-19.

Here are some tips on how to properly put on and take off a mask:

 

  

WPSU’s Health Minute is a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The past few weeks have been challenging as we continue to take precautions to slow and prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Here are some tips to help you stay connected to your family, friends, and community:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

As the Covid-19 pandemic continues, it’s important to take the time to wash your hands properly to prevent the spread of germs.

For proper handwashing:

1. Wet your hands with running water, then lather with soap.

2. Scrub your hands for at least 20 seconds. To ensure accurate timing, hum the “Happy Birthday” song twice from beginning to end. 

3. Finish by rinsing your hands with running water and drying them using an air dryer or a clean towel.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.  

With the holiday gift-giving season approaching, many ask how to choose the right toy for a child. Play is important for children’s cognitive, physical, and social development.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends choosing toys that engage children socially and physically and urges limiting electronic toys.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues, taking measures to avoid getting influenza and pneumonia is more important than ever. Catching either on top of Covid-19 can increase the severity and duration of illness. Each year, 35 million people in the United States are sickened with influenza and 1.3 million are diagnosed with pneumonia.  

Shirley Moody-Turner is an associate professor of English and African American studies and co-director of the Center for Black Digital Research at Penn State. Denise Burgher is a doctoral candidate in English at the University of Delaware and project coordinator for The Colored Conventions project. They talked with us about about the contributions of black women to the suffrage movement and the role of black women in political organizing.

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Part of healthy living is maintaining a healthy weight.

Body Mass Index or BMI is a screening method used to categorize people as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. A healthy BMI for an adult is between 18.5 and 24.9. A high BMI can be an indicator of high body fat, which can contribute to serious health conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers and mental illnesses.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The World Health Organization defines Palliative Care as “an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problems associated with life-threatening illness.” It allows patients to continue to seek medical treatments while obtaining pain management, and physical, psychological and spiritual support.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Accidents involving common household products and outside activities cause over 100,000 eye injuries each year. Many of these injuries are caused by objects, particles, chemicals or radiation. They can result in temporary or permanent vision loss.

Safety glasses can prevent eye damage and are a must for any activity that poses a risk to the eyes. This protection includes sunglasses, which can shield your eyes from the sun’s harmful rays.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

The Great American Smokeout is this Thursday. It’s an annual intervention that challenges people to quit smoking and vaping for one day.  

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

According to the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, preliminary research suggests that yoga has multiple health benefits. 

Yoga combines breathing, movement, and mindfulness. Practicing yoga may help with weight loss, improved sleep, stress reduction, and pain management.

Different kinds of yoga can be adapted to virtually any body type, medical condition, or physical ability. 

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

November is National Family Caregiver Month.

According to the National Alliance for Caregiving, most family caregivers have a job in addition to assisting their family member. Over 50% of family caregivers are women and more than one million family caregivers are between the ages of 8 and 18.  Caregivers can struggle with feelings of inadequacy, compassion fatigue or burnout, depression, and lack of community support.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month.

Domestic violence can include physical, sexual, psychological, or stalking behaviors used to harm or control a current or former partner. 

Domestic violence is common. Physical injuries, depression, substance use, and unstable housing are all linked to domestic violence.

Courtesy Tierra Williams

Tierra Williams is a mother, artist, performer and activist who joined the social justice movements in Central Pennsylvania after moving here from Mississippi. She talks with us about why she uses her voice to speak up against injustices and what she wants her son to know about the importance of fighting for equality.  

TRANSCRIPT

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

October is Bullying Prevention Month.

Bullying has lasting effects on a person’s development, their interactions with others, and their performance in school.

Bullying even impacts physical health, leading to increases in symptoms like headaches, sleep difficulties, and depression.

Courtesy Kyra Gines

George Floyd’s killing by Minneapolis police led people all over the world, including here in Central Pennsylvania, to take to the streets in protest. Kyra Gines, a Penn State sophomore, joined a diverse group of high school students to organize a 12-hour protest in downtown State College. Kyra’s activism began at State College Area High School, spurred by the 2016 election. She participated in protests around issues including gun control and led the school’s Diversity and Activism Club.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

As we live through this extended pandemic, there has never been a better time to understand the importance of being prepared for a disaster.

According to the Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, you and your family can decrease the likelihood of injury or death if you plan for the unexpected and prepare an emergency disaster kit.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Summer and early fall provide wonderful choices for fruits and vegetables. Eating a variety of colorful fruits and vegetables not only helps keep your weight in check, but can also lower your cholesterol and blood pressure, and decrease your risk for heart disease and diabetes.

To increase your intake of fruits and vegetables:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

According to the American Diabetes Association, more than 34 million Americans, or about 10% of the population, has diabetes.  88 million Americans have pre-diabetes. Uncontrolled diabetes is a serious life-long condition and can cause many complications, including kidney damage, eye issues like glaucoma or blindness, and heart complications.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer found only in men and the third most common non-skin cancer diagnosed in Americans. It is the second most common cause of cancer deaths among American men; and, the death rate is higher for Black men.

In its early stages, prostate cancer may not produce symptoms, so routine exams or specific antigen tests are needed for prevention and early detection. Prostate cancer is typically treatable if it’s caught early.

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The Covid-19 pandemic has dominated the news this year, but there are other diseases that can cause widespread illness too, like influenza, measles, and mumps.

Immunizations are the best tools modern medicine has to stop infectious diseases in their tracks.  

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

“Contact tracing” is reaching out to people who may have been exposed to COVID-19.

Exposure includes being within 6 feet of someone with COVID-19 for at least 15 minutes; being around someone 48 to 72 hours before they had symptoms and through the end of the infectious period; having direct contact with infectious secretions; or, being coughed on by someone with COVID-19.

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