In this file photo from July 2018, Centre County District Attorney Bernie Cantorna spoke at a town hall in Philipsburg on opioids.
Min Xian / WPSU

District Attorney, Police Departments Release Statements On Racial Inequities

Centre County District Attorney Bernie Cantorna , the Centre County sheriff, and police chiefs from State College and Bellefonte, Spring, Patton, and Ferguson Townships and Penn State released statements Thursday on racial inequities in the United States and a police officer’s oath to protect and serve. D.A. Cantorna called George Floyd’s death “criminal and inhumane.” Ferguson Township’s Chief of Police, Chris Albright, said police are upset about Floyd’s death too. “I don’t know a single...

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In this file photo from July 2018, Centre County District Attorney Bernie Cantorna spoke at a town hall in Philipsburg on opioids.
Min Xian / WPSU

 

Centre County District Attorney Bernie Cantorna, the Centre County sheriff, and police chiefs from State College and Bellefonte, Spring, Patton, and Ferguson Townships and Penn State released statements Thursday on racial inequities in the United States and a police officer’s oath to protect and serve. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Love

19 hours ago

I believe in love.

When I was a baby, I was adopted from China. I have always considered my adopted family my “real” family, as some would say. When I was little, I used to always ask my mom about the day I was adopted. She told me it was one of the happiest moments of her life. She knew I was very scared. I had lived in the orphanage for a full year, so when I suddenly had a family it was very overwhelming. But, my parents were very patient with me and did everything they could to show me they loved me and cared about me.
 

State College Area students driving in a red car, participated in the Senior Parade on May 27, 2020.
Min Xian / WPSU

  

In March, Gov. Tom Wolf ordered Pennsylvania’s K through 12 schools closed to help stop the spread of COVID-19. That meant high school students had to adjust to a new “normal” of learning remotely. 

For Ronit Patel, a senior at State College Area High School who is also a musician, that has meant turning to music.

“To let out all my frustrations about quarantine and stuff, I just sing. I belt my heart out and sing," Patel said. "And, I feel like it’s really helped me stay kind of positive in this horrible, horrible time.” 

In-person turnout for the primary election Tuesday was low in Centre County.
Min Xian / WPSU

In-person turnout for the primary election Tuesday was low in Centre County. Many voters opted to vote by mail, an option significantly expanded last year and especially encouraged because of COVID-19.

Jordan Emely is a judge of elections in State College. About ten percent of the voters registered in his precinct had sent in their mail-in ballots before the primary. 

Junior Lexy Leidlein at a Penn State football game.
Lexy Leidlein

Junior journalism major Lexy Leidlein is back home in her childhood bedroom in Waterbury, Connecticut. In mid-May she visited State College to move out of her dorm. While she was in town, Leidlein noticed several downtown houses hosting “porch parties.” It made her think students will not follow social distancing protocols. 

Tuesday is primary election day in Pennsylvania, which the state postponed from April because of the coronavirus. Primary this year will feel different with potentially longer lines at polling places even though fewer voter are expected.
Min Xian / WPSU

Tuesday is primary election day in Pennsylvania, which the state postponed from April because of the coronavirus. Besides the date change, this year’s primary will also feel different with potentially longer lines at polling places even though fewer voters are expected to show up. 

Denise Meyer, an election judge in Centre County, said she’ll be working at her precinct in Ferguson Township for the primary, because she feels an obligation.

WPSU

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

June is Alzheimer’s and Brain Awareness Month.

According to the Alzheimer’s Association, over 5 million Americans live with dementia, with Alzheimer’s disease being the most common type.

Brain health is influenced by lifestyle choices. Here are some steps you can take that may lower your risk for memory and thinking problems as you age:

Stephen D. Solomon
NYU Journalism

This is another episode that we recorded in our final days together in the office before COVID-19. However, the topic is just as relevant — if not more so — in our new reality.

The topic is free speech and our guest is Stephen D. Solomon, Marjorie Deane Professor at the Arthur L. Carter Journalism Institute at New York University and founding editor of First Amendment Watch. He is the author of Revolutionary Dissent: How the Founding Generation Created the Freedom of Speech.

More than a thousand people took to the streets in downtown State College Sunday to protest the death of George Floyd.
Min Xian / WPSU

More than a thousand people took to the streets in downtown State College Sunday to protest the death of George Floyd, a black man in Minneapolis who died after a white police officer kneeled on his neck. 

Chanting “No justice, no peace!” and “say his name,” protestors started at the Allen Street Gate, then marched on College Avenue and Beaver Avenue. The march ended in front of the State College Municipal Building, where the police department is located. 

Jeff Daly / Invision/AP Images

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues show as aired on May 23, 2020 and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear tracks from David Bromberg, The Temptations, The Black Keys, Taj Mahal, Ken Schwartz & The Palace of Sin, Blind Willie McTell, Little Feat, Dave Van Ronk, Rhiannon Giddings & The Silk Road Ensemble, Doc Watson & Clarence Ashley, Rodriguez, Jorma Kaukonen, and more.

In the second hour, hear The Dixie Hummingbirds, Leon Redone, Mississippi John Hurt, Cory Harris, Bob Dylan, Brownie McGhee, Peter Green, Ray Charles, Rev. Gary Davis, and more. 

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NPR Stories

As the country erupts in protests over police brutality and racism, two-thirds of Americans think President Trump has increased racial tensions in the U.S., according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

The poll offers a snapshot of a nation in upheaval after a video captured a Minneapolis police officer with his knee on the neck of a black man named George Floyd, who was pleading for his life before he died.

The mayor of Tacoma, Wash., is calling for four officers involved in the arrest of Manuel Ellis, a black man who was killed while in police custody, to be "fired and prosecuted to the full extent of the law."

As America's meat producers confronted thousands of COVID-19 cases, Pacific Northwest seafood companies drafted rigorous plans to ward off similar spread of the disease in an industry where processors also work in close quarters.

But just a few weeks into the summer season, the industry has been shaken by its first major outbreak aboard a huge vessel with an onboard fish processing factory. This week, Seattle-based American Seafoods confirmed that 92 crew from its American Dynasty ship had tested positive for COVID-19, nearly three-fourths of the 126 people onboard.

Berlin has become the first German state to pass its own anti-discrimination law. The law bars public authorities — including police — from discriminating against anyone based on background, skin color, gender, religion, disabilities, worldview, age, class, education and sexual identity.

The legislation passed Thursday has been in the works for weeks, but it has taken on a new meaning in the wake of protests against systemic racism that have erupted in the U.S. and spread to cities around the world, including Berlin.

As technology evolves, so does protest. Awareness of George Floyd's killing at the hands of Minneapolis police officers could only inspire an international grassroots movement because a teenager, Darnella Frazier, decided to record his arrest using her phone and post it to social media. Activists are organizing marches and rallies on Twitter and Instagram, even as they warn participants to be careful of surveillance on those platforms.

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For One Immigrant Community, George Floyd's Death Isn't Just About Black And White

There's something about the video of the George Floyd killing that makes it very specific to the Twin Cities. The video shows a white police officer and a black male victim — a familiar dynamic in similar videos and killings seen nationwide — but there's a third identifiable person: an Asian American officer seen running interference with the crowd and standing watch. He's now-former Minneapolis police officer Tou Thao, a Hmong American — which is how you know this isn't "any" city. It's...

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Why Is Voting By Mail (Suddenly) Controversial? Here's What You Need To Know

Casting a ballot by mail isn't a new way to vote, but it is getting fresh attention as the coronavirus pandemic upends daily life. The voting method is quickly becoming the norm and quickly becoming politically charged as some Republicans — specifically President Trump — fight against the mail-voting expansion happening nationwide. Here are answers to key questions about mail ballots and the controversy around them. What is mail voting? Which states are offering mail voting? What do Americans...

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From Freddie Gray To George Floyd: Wes Moore Says It's Time To 'Change The Systems'

The killing of George Floyd has inspired protests across the U.S. and around the world , with crowds evoking the names of other black men and women who have died in police custody — including Freddie Gray . In 2015, Gray was arrested in Baltimore, and put in a police van — shackled but with no seatbelt. At the end of what was later termed a "rough ride," Gray was unconscious and his neck was broken. He died a week later. Author Wes Moore chronicles the uprising that occurred in Baltimore...

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Former Memphis Mayor A.C. Wharton On The Protests, Turmoil In America

A.C. Wharton , former mayor of Memphis, Tennessee, discusses the protests across the country following the death of George Floyd, as well as the toll the coronavirus pandemic has taken in his community and the country. This article was originally published on WBUR.org. Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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What The Civil Rights Movement Of The '60s Can Teach Atlanta Protesters Now

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. was behind the pulpit in Atlanta in 1967, the year before he was killed, when he told churchgoers at Ebenezer Baptist Church that sometimes there is an "obligation" to break certain man-made laws. "It is important to see that there are times when a man-made law is out of harmony with the moral law of the universe, there are times when human law is out of harmony with eternal and divine laws," the civil rights leader said at the time. "And when that happens, you...

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Primary Election Snafus Show Challenges For November Vote

The day after eight states and the District of Columbia held primaries — amid both a pandemic and civil unrest — proponents of mail-in voting said there were lessons to be learned for November, when millions more voters are expected to use absentee ballots. They noted that voters had to wait for hours Tuesday to cast ballots at limited polling sites in Washington, D.C., in part because many did not receive the absentee ballots they had requested. Similar problems arose in Pennsylvania,...

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Coronavirus: A Weekly Report From NPR News

Friday nights at 8:00 on WPSU, NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro hosts a wrap-up of the week's coronavirus news.

It's Been a Minute: Calm for the Chaos

Coronavirus has reshaped our lives. How do you keep connections, show love, and seek comfort in social isolation? Join us for this special series, Saturdays at 6 p.m. during the month of June.

COVID-19 Coverage

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How are you surviving the #coronavirus pandemic & lockdown. Email your story to radionews@psu.edu or share it on social media with #HowWeEndure A reporter might contact you for an interview.

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New Weekend Schedule on WPSU-FM

We've added a few new shows to our weekend schedule February 1, incluing NPR's "It's Been a Mnute" with Sam Sanders. You'll find details at the link below.

Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

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