North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

Over the past half-century, North America has lost more than a quarter of its entire bird population, or around 3 billion birds. That's according to a new estimate published in the journal Science by researchers who brought together a variety of information that has been collected on 529 bird species since 1970. "We saw this tremendous net loss across the entire bird community," says Ken Rosenberg , an applied conservation scientist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, N.Y. "By our...

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Penn State Celebrates National Constitution Day

14 hours ago
"Constitution Day" welcome sign placed outside of Heritage Hall in the HUB student union.
Brittany Krugel / WPSU

Penn State held a celebration Tuesday to celebrate National Constitution Day. Students shared their interpretations of several different amendments to the U.S. Constitution at Heritage Hall in the HUB student union. 

Isabella Scotti, a sophomore and a music education major, presented about the 14th Amendment, which addresses citizenship and equal rights for all citizens. Scotti says the Constitution can be used to interpret some of the political debates that are happening today.

Ken Baxter

Ken Baxter is a Central Pennsylvania singer/songwriter, originally from Boston. He lost his son, Alex, to suicide years ago. On Saturday, September 21 at 7:00 p.m, he’ll play a concert called "The Philosophy of Hope," at the State Theatre in State College to raise funds for the Jana Marie Foundation, a local group that works on suicide prevention.  Joining him on stage for the concert will be his other son, Nick Baxter, who’s a music producer in Hollywood. Ken Baxter talks about suicide, life lessons, and moving forward.

Attorney Kathleen Yurcak stands next to Iyunolu and Sylvester Osagie Sept. 12, 2019, during a press conference
Anne Danahy / WPSU

Attorneys for the family of the 29-year-old State College man who was fatally shot by police in March have filed a notice of plans to sue the State College police. At a press conference Thursday, attorneys said they believe the death was avoidable and want access to all information in the case.

With Osaze Osagie’s parents standing behind them, lawyers for the family — including Andrew Celli — said the legal filing is the first step in holding the system responsible.

Kristine Allen / WPSU

Last fall, Altoona Community Theatre lost their long-time executive director to a sudden illness. Their new theatre season begins September 19-22, with a production of Neil Simon’s “Lost in Yonkers,” at Altoona’s Mishler Theatre. It’s an emotional time for the theatre group, as they remember an old friend, and welcome a new leader.

Steve Helsel was, for decades, the first and only executive director of Altoona Community Theatre, also known as “ACT.”  Members of the theatre speak of him as a leader, a whirlwind of creativity, and a good friend to everyone.

Stanford University

We've wanted to do an episode on China for a long time and we are very excited to have Larry Diamond with us to discuss it. China plays an integral role in Larry Diamond's new book, Ill Winds: Saving Democracy from Russian Rage, Chinese Ambition, and American Complacency, and he's studied the region for decades.

revgarydavis.com

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues show as aired on September 14, 2019 and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear tracks from Otis Rush, Rev. Gary Davis, Michele Lancaster & Sweet Honey In The Rock, The Black Keys, The Persuasions, The White Stripes, Luther Dixon & The Rising Stars, Bob Dylan, Harry Connick Jr., Aaron Neville, Joseph Spence, John Lee Hooker, and more.

In the second hour, hear The Jimmy Rogers All Stars, Josh White, Mac Arnold, Buddy Guy, Chris Smither, Blind Boy Fuller, Lowell Fulson, and more.

This I Believe: I Believe In Jeopardy

Sep 12, 2019
Essayist Steph Krane
WPSU

I believe in Jeopardy. Growing up, my family had a dinnertime routine. No matter what food we were eating or who was sitting around the kitchen table that night, we would always watch Jeopardy! at 7 o’clock. As Alex Trebek read the questions (or, as they’re known in Jeopardy terms, answers), we ate leftover lasagna and tried to remember facts about world geography and Shakespeare. The first person to shout out the correct answer was the winner.

Angela Hsieh / NPR

September's Democratic presidential debate has been narrowed to one night only, as more candidates have called it quits altogether.

Ten candidates are on stage for three-hour event hosted by ABC News and Univision, beginning at 8:00 p.m. ET. It's the third debate of the campaign and the first time that former Vice President Joe Biden, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders are all together.

Who will be the main target, what does it mean and what do the candidates stand for? Follow NPR Politics reporters for live analysis and fact checks.

Members of the panel at a "Community Conversation On Suicide."
Brittany Krugel / WPSU

 

About 20 people attended a "Community Conversation on Suicide" at the State College Municipal Building sponsored by March for Our Lives and CeaseFire PA.

Panel members included activists from both organizations and Tom King, the former State College police chief.

Alex Wind, one of the co-founders of the March for our Lives movement, described the effects that gun violence and mass shootings have on current suicide rates. 

Kristine Allen / WPSU

Actor and playwright Charles Dumas has written a new play, to be performed in staged readings this weekend at Three Dots in State College. It tells the story of the police shooting of Osaze Osagie in March.

The title of Dumas’ play is “Osaze Remembering…” In excerpts from the prologue, read for us at WPSU by Charles Dumas and his wife, Jo Dumas, the audience is told up front that they’ll be exposed to various points of view on the death of Osaze Osagie.

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An 18-year-old has been arrested and charged in the stabbing death this week in New York of Khaseen Morris, who died surrounded by a crowd of students taking cellphone video of the attack as he bled out on the ground.

Tyler Flach was charged with second-degree murder and was arraigned in court on Thursday, according to Nassau County police. He pleaded not guilty to killing Morris, a 16-year-old senior at Oceanside High School, during an after-school fight that broke out over a girl. Morris later died in a hospital.

When the first enslaved Africans landed on American shores in 1619, their musical traditions landed with them. Four centuries later, the primacy of African American music is indisputable, not only in this country but in much of the world. How that music has evolved, blending with or giving rise to other traditions — from African songs and dances to field hollers and spirituals, from ragtime and blues to jazz, R&B and hip-hop — is a topic of endless discussion.

YouTube

By and large, 1969 was a transformative year in the U.S.

Senators thawed a long-frozen dispute over election security this week with an agreement to provide more funding ahead of Election Day next year — but not as much as some Democrats and outside activists say is necessary.

Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., agreed to add $250 million for election security after having held up earlier legislation.

The money will be used by the federal government and the states, he said, and in a way that McConnell argues is appropriate for the federal system and without unreasonable new mandates from Congress.

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

Over the past half-century, North America has lost more than a quarter of its entire bird population, or around 3 billion birds. That's according to a new estimate published in the journal Science by researchers who brought together a variety of information that has been collected on 529 bird species since 1970. "We saw this tremendous net loss across the entire bird community," says Ken Rosenberg , an applied conservation scientist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, N.Y. "By our...

Read More

Schiff Vows To Escalate Standoff Over Spy Complaint; 'Fake News,' Trump Scoffs

Updated at 6:25 p.m. ET House intelligence committee Chairman Adam Schiff vowed Thursday he is willing to sue the Trump administration over a dispute about the content of an as-yet-unknown complaint to the intelligence community's official watchdog. Schiff told reporters after a closed-door meeting with the inspector general, Michael Atkinson, that the Justice Department has opined that the material is shielded by privilege and can be withheld from lawmakers. Not so, Schiff argued, and "if we...

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Imelda Causing 'Major, Catastrophic Flooding' In Southeast Texas, Forecasters Warn

Updated at 4:10 p.m. ET Swaths of southeast Texas were underwater Thursday after Tropical Depression Imelda caused catastrophic flooding. Scores of residents had to be carried through the floodwaters and motorists needed to be rescued from submerged vehicles. Children were forced to shelter in place at schools in Houston. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott declared a state of disaster in 13 counties Thursday, saying the severe weather "has caused widespread and severe property damage and threatens loss...

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The Vaping Illness Outbreak: What We Know So Far

Updated on Sept. 19 at 2:00 p.m. ET to reflect the latest information from federal agencies. An outbreak of severe lung disease among users of electronic cigarettes continues to spread to new patients and states, and public health officials say it's too soon to point to a cause. According to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a total of 530 confirmed and probable cases have been identified in 38 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The CDC has confirmed...

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In The 'Downton Abbey' Film, A Royal Visit Proves Rather A Spot Of Bother

There is nostalgia, and there is Downton Abbey . Nostalgia bathes the past in a golden light that falls patchily, shining clear and steady on what was tidy and genteel, while leaving an era's ugliest, most brutal recesses sunk in shadow. The light thrown by Downton Abbey over the course of its six televised seasons proved even more fitful; creator Julian Fellowes illumined a past where rigid class distinctions existed to make everyone, high-born and low-, know their place and keep to it...

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Speaker Nancy Pelosi Unveils Plan To Lower Prescription Drug Costs

Updated at 11:20 a.m. ET House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., unveiled her long-anticipated plan to lower the cost of prescription drugs on Thursday. It is a priority shared by President Trump, fueling a glimmer of hope that there is a deal to be had on the issue ahead of the 2020 elections. "It is transformative," Pelosi said of her plan."We do hope to have White House buy-in." The speaker's proposal calls for the federal government, through the health and human services secretary, to...

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'Choked' By Air Pollution: An Invisible Consequence Of Climate Change

This story is part of  Covering Climate Now , a week-long global initiative of over 250 news outlets. On top of rising sea levels, intense hurricanes and massive wildfires, climate change is also making it harder for us to breathe.  The World Health Organization estimates that air pollution kills about 7 million people a year across the world, and climate change could make it much worse.  Air pollution and climate change are distinct issues, but they are also deeply connected, writes author...

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'Downton Abbey' Creator Julian Fellowes On Going From TV To The Big Screen

Here & Nows Robin Young talks with Julian Fellowes , who created the TV series Downton Abbey and wrote the screenplay for a new film based on the show. Watch on YouTube. This article was originally published on WBUR.org. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Russian Lab Explosion Raises Question: Should Smallpox Virus Be Kept Or Destroyed?

An explosion this week in a Russian lab , one of only two labs in the world known to store live samples of the variola virus, which causes smallpox, has raised anew questions that have been asked since the disease was eradicated in 1980. Should humankind hold on to the live virus to conduct research on treatments, tests and vaccines in case smallpox were to reemerge? Or is it more prudent to destroy all samples of the live virus to avoid any accidental or intentional release and instead rely...

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Canadian PM Trudeau Apologizes For Brownface Costume At 2001 Party

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is apologizing for having worn brownface makeup at a 2001 costume party. "I should have known better then, but I didn't and I did it and I'm deeply sorry," he said to reporters in his campaign plane in Halifax, Nova Scotia. The revelation was first reported by Time magazine late Wednesday which published a picture of Trudeau wearing a turban and robe with dark makeup on his face, neck and hands for an Arabian Nights-themed party at a private school where...

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Phoenix Residents Will Need To Adapt To An Even Hotter Climate

This story is part of  Covering Climate Now , a week-long global initiative of over 250 news outlets. The hottest day in Phoenix history is June 26, 1990, when temperatures reached 122 degrees — but thanks to climate change, the desert city’s sweltering heat could break this record. In hot places like Phoenix, residents rely on taking a break from the heat at night when temperatures significantly drop. But over the last half-century, the average nighttime temperature in Phoenix has increased...

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As Drugmakers Face Opioid Lawsuits, Some Ask: Why Not Criminal Charges Too?

Purdue Pharma, facing a mountain of litigation linked to the opioid epidemic, filed for bankruptcy in New York this week. The OxyContin manufacturer and its owners, the Sackler family, have offered to pay billions of dollars to cities and counties hit hard by the addiction crisis. But that's not good enough for critics such as U.S. Rep. Max Rose. "The Sackler family does not belong in bankruptcy court," Rose, a New York Democrat, told a news conference earlier this week . "They belong in...

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Pennsylvania State Senator Resigns After Arrest On Child Porn Charges

Updated 1:35 p.m. ET A Pennsylvania state senator has stepped down following his arrest on charges of possession of child pornography. Sen. Mike Folmer submitted his letter of resignation on Wednesday to Republican colleagues in Harrisburg, according to leadership in the state chamber. "We are sickened and disturbed by the charges brought against Mike Folmer," the Pennsylvania lawmakers said in a statement . After reviewing the charges and speaking to Folmer, they said they insisted that he...

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Bolivia Is Fighting Major Forest Fires Nearly As Large As In Brazil

Six volunteer firefighters use machetes to cut a path through the vines and underbrush of the Chiquitano forest in Bolivia's eastern lowlands. They're approaching the leading edge of a fire that's been burning for hours. They attempt to smother it with shovelfuls of dirt and water they carry on their backs in tanks normally used to fumigate crops. But the smoke is getting thicker, the heat stronger and swirling winds push the flames forward. Realizing they are overmatched, José Zapata, the...

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'Ad Astra' Soars

With its austere surfaces and jaundiced view of humanity's interplanetary destiny, James Gray's stirring sci-fi epic Ad Astra can't help but evoke Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, the paterfamilias of all "serious" space movies. But in fact it's a closer cousin to another long-delayed, wildly over-budget spectacle that initially fared better with ticket-buyers than critics, only to be revealed in time as a masterpiece: Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now . Like Coppola's surreal...

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Lawmakers Hear Emotional Stories From 'Forgotten Crisis' Of Military Domestic Violence

Former wives and partners of servicemen who survived domestic abuse told their harrowing stories before the House Armed Services military preparedness subcommittee as they pressed for more attention to and resources for the growing problem within the armed forces. "We are here today because domestic violence has become a forgotten crisis in our military," chairwoman Jackie Speier, D-Calif., said in her opening remarks before the military preparedness subcommittee. "The [Department of Defense]...

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Take Note: Ken Baxter

Friday at 1p.m. & Sunday at 7p.m.: Ken Baxter lost his son Alex to suicide. On Sept. 21, he’ll play a concert to raise funds for suicide prevention. He talks about loss, his music, and moving forward.

Saturdays at 12:00pm, now through Oct. 5.

Without our being fully aware, hacking, artificial intelligence, offensive cyber, and data surveillance have crept into our lives. This special series from NPR explores the dangers..

Overcoming an Epidemic: Opioids in Pennsylvania

WPSU explores evidence-based solutions to the opioids epidemic through a podcast, videos and website.

Listen to Morning Edition on-demand on all Alexa-enabled smart speakers. Say, "Alexa, play Morning Edition ," and you'll hear the last hour of that day's show from your favorite NPR station.

Hear NPR's 1A on WPSU, Weekdays at 1:00pm

Host Joshua Johnson leads an insightful daily discussion with culture makers and thought leaders about politics and policy, culture, and whatever else is driving the most provocative dialogue that day

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WPSU Digital Shorts

Check out WPSU's short digital stories highlighting the arts, culture, science and activities in central Pennsylvania and beyond.

Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

NPR's "Planet Money/How I Built This"

Saturdays at 7:00am: “Planet Money” and “How I Built This” are two half-hour shows that together make a one-hour weekly program on business and entrepreneurship from NPR.

Get your NPR News Fix This Weekend!

Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings, 8:00-10:00am; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm on WPSU-FM.

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The Folk Show on WPSU-FM

Listen for The Folk Show, Saturday afternoons from 1:00 p.m. to 5p.m. & Sunday nights from 10:00 p.m. to midnight on WPSU-FM.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.