Debby and Ken Iwaniec
Anne Danahy / WPSU

The Impact Of A DUI On A Family The Focus Of Penn State Event

In 2008, Kenton Iwaniec was driving home from his job as a state police trooper in Chester County when an impaired driver’s vehicle crashed into his. The driver had a blood alcohol level more than four times the legal limit and had taken Oxycodone illegally. Penn State University Police & Public Safety is sponsoring a talk by the Iwaniec family, “An Empty Seat at the Table,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24, in the HUB-Robeson Center at University Park. WPSU’s Anne Danahy talked with Kenton...

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Debby and Ken Iwaniec
Anne Danahy / WPSU

In 2008, Kenton Iwaniec was driving home from his job as a state police trooper in Chester County when an impaired driver’s vehicle crashed into his. The driver had a blood alcohol level more than four times the legal limit and had taken Oxycodone illegally. Penn State University Police & Public Safety is sponsoring a talk by the Iwaniec family, “An Empty Seat at the Table,” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 24, in the HUB-Robeson Center at University Park. WPSU’s Anne Danahy talked with Kenton’s parents, Ken and Debby Iwaniec.

There are a lot of calls these days to "revive civility" in politics. While there are plenty of examples of uncivil behavior, there's far less agreement about what civility should look like in 2019. Timothy Shaffer joins us this week to talk about work being done to create a new definition of civility and a playbook to put that definition into practice.

Kenny Mathieson / eddireader.co.uk

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues show as aired on April 20, 2019 and hosted by Max Spiegel. This week, its Max’s 5th Annual Max’s Birthday Show where the program is filled with his favorite songs. 

In the first hour, hear tracks from Ry Cooder, Prince, Rev. Gary Davis, Led Zeppelin, Ray Charles, Mel Tormé, Richard Thompson, Tom Waites, Jack Shelton, Bob Dylan, Brad Vickers and His Vestapolitans, and more.

Elizabeth Stordeur Pryor is an associate professor of history at Smith College, whose work includes the paper “The Etymology of the N-Word: Resistance, Language, and the Politics of Freedom in the Antebellum North.” She recently visited Penn State Altoona to speak about her research. And, she spoke with WPSU's Anne Danahy about the history of the N-word, how she discusses it with students and what it meant to her father, the comedian Richard Pryor. 

WPSU Jazz Archive - April 19, 2019

Apr 19, 2019
www.jackteagarden.info / MCA Publicity Photo

An archive recording for the WPSU Jazz show as aired on April 19, 2019 and hosted by Rana Glick.

In the first hour, hear tracks from Jack Teagarden, Pat Metheny, Joe Williams, Charlie Byrd, Herbie Hancock, Tina Turner, Ornette Coleman, and more.

In the second hour, hear, June April, Benny Carter, Andy Solberg, Shemekia Copeland, Charles Mingus, and more.

BookMark: "A Higher Loyalty" By James Comey

Apr 18, 2019

I have a hardback copy of Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House,” and I have a Kindle copy of Bob Woodward’s “Fear: Trump in the White House.” But while I started them both, I haven’t finished reading them. When I picked up James Comey’s “A Higher Loyalty,” on the other hand, I had a hard time putting it down. While it is a historically important book, Comey’s down-to-earth style and willingness to convey emotions as well as hard facts also made me feel like I was getting to know the author personally.

Andrew Harnik / AP

Attorney General William Barr delivers a press conference at the Justice Department Thursday morning at 9:30, ahead of the expected release of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. A redacted version of the report is expected to be released on Thursday. Watch live below.

Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman (second from right) polled the audience during his listening tour on recreational marijuana in State College on April 16, 2019.
Min Xian / WPSU

Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman’s listening tour on recreational marijuana made its stop in Centre County Tuesday. The overwhelming majority of those who spoke supported legalization of recreational marijuana.

A retired state police officer said he believes marijuana doesn’t make people violent and that prosecution of pot related crimes is too harsh.

E.J. Dionne has the unique perspective of studying the horse race and the big picture of American politics. He writes a twice-weekly column for the Washington Post and appears regularly on NPR, but he's also a senior fellow at Brookings and professor in Foundations of Democracy and Culture at Georgetown University.

Neal Preston / greggallman.com

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues show as aired on April 13, 2019 and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear tracks from Loaded Dice, Ry Cooder, Shuggie Otis, Big Bill Bronzy, Bob Dylan, Dr. John, Etta James, Ghost Town Blues Band, Gregg Allman, Skip James, Lovin’  Spoonful, The Black Keys, and more.

In the second hour, hear The Bill Murray Experience, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, Bob Brozman, Samantha Fish, The Tedeschi Trucks Band, John Lee Hooker, Super Chicken, Mississippi Fred McDowell, and more.   

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NPR Stories

More young people are leaning into the rental or sharing economy — owning less of everything and renting and sharing a whole lot more. Housing, cars, music, workspaces. In some places, like Los Angeles, this rental life has gone to an extreme.

Steven T. Johnson, 27, works in social media advertising and lives in Hollywood. He spends most of his days using things he does not own.

He takes a ride-share to get to the gym; he does not own a car. At the gym, he rents a locker. He uses the gym's laundry service because he does not own a washing machine.

The next time parking enforcement officers use chalk to mark your tires, they might be acting unconstitutionally.

A federal appeals court ruled Monday that "chalking" is a violation of the Fourth Amendment.

The case was brought by Alison Taylor, a Michigan woman whom the court describes as a "frequent recipient of parking tickets." The city of Saginaw, Mich., like countless other cities around the country, uses chalk to mark the tires of cars to enforce time limits on parking.

President Trump will pay a state visit to the U.K. in early June, according to Buckingham Palace, which says Trump has accepted an invitation from Queen Elizabeth II to visit America's closest ally.

The visit will take place "from Monday 3rd June to Wednesday 5th June," the palace announced Tuesday.

The White House says the state visit "will reaffirm the steadfast and special relationship between the United States and the United Kingdom."

A federal appeals court in Philadelphia ruled that city contractors must abide by nondiscrimination policies in the placement of foster children with same-sex couples.

A three-judge panel of the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals sided with the city, which had ended a foster-care contract with an agency of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. That agency, Catholic Social Services, had declined to place foster children in LGBTQ households and sought an injunction that would have forced the city to renew its contract.

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Sri Lankan Official Says Bombings Are Retaliation For New Zealand Massacre

A Sri Lankan government official says coordinated suicide bombings in the island nation on Easter Sunday, which killed more than 320 people, were carried out in retaliation for last month's mass shooting at mosques in New Zealand. The state minister for defense, Ruwan Wijewardene, said the attacks were carried out by two Islamist organizations. As NPR's Lauren Frayer reports, "it's not immediately clear how he knows that – whether the information comes from suspects being interrogated, or...

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A Decade Of Implications At Stake, Supreme Court Hears Census Citizenship Question

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday in a legal battle with lasting implications that could dramatically affect political representation and federal funding over the next decade. The justices are weighing whether to allow the Trump administration to add a question about U.S. citizenship status to forms for the upcoming 2020 census. In multiple lawsuits brought by dozens of states, cities and other groups , three federal judges at U.S. district courts have issued...

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At The U.S.-Mexico Border, Volunteer Medics Step In To Care For Migrants

Dr. Eugene Marciniak recently examined about a dozen patients at a Catholic retreat center in Las Cruces, N.M. He set up shop at a corner table in the cafeteria and called families over one by one: a mother with belly pain, a child with a low-grade fever, a teen girl with a cracked and possibly infected tooth. They had just been released from government custody and were staying at the center for a night or two before joining relatives in other parts of the United States. "We just check them...

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Lost Pup Finds New Life As Humanitarian Mascot In Refugee Camp

Cox's Bazar, a town in Bangladesh, has become the headquarters for the massive humanitarian operation to support the nearly 1 million Rohingya refugees who have fled from Myanmar. But Cox's Bazar is also home to what local tourism officials tout as the "longest sand beach in the world" –with 75 miles of unbroken sandy coastline. Once a month those two worlds come together as international humanitarian workers from the dozens of charity groups in Cox's Bazar volunteer in a beach cleanup. It...

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Quebec Lawmakers Consider Divisive Religious Symbols Ban

Lawmakers in the Canadian province of Quebec are considering a bill that would ban public workers, such as police officers and teachers, from wearing religious symbols while on the job. Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson speaks with David Rand , a spokesperson for the Alliance for Secularism and president of Atheist Freethinkers, and Lionel Perez , leader of the official opposition with the city of Montreal. This article was originally published on WBUR.org. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit...

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Hospitals Chafe Under A Medicare Rule That Reduces Payments To Far-Flung Clinics

Eric Lewis' plans of expanding his community hospital's reach have been derailed. As CEO of Olympic Medical Center, he oversees efforts to provide care to roughly 75,000 people in Clallam County, in the isolated, rural northwestern corner of Washington state. Last year, Lewis planned to build a primary care clinic in Sequim, a town about 17 miles from the medical center's main campus of a hospital and clinics in Port Angeles. But those plans were put aside, Lewis says, because of a change in...

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The Traffic Tariff

As cities all over the world grow, they're struggling with crowded streets and polluted air. New York City has decided to try out one possible solution: congestion pricing. Drivers will soon be charged a toll to enter certain crowded neighborhoods. Officials hope it will cut down on traffic and bring in badly needed funds to help repair the city's public transportation system. Today on the show, Stacey Vanek Smith and Darius Rafieyan venture out into Midtown Manhattan during rush hour to see...

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Kevin Morby Takes A Hard Look At God In America

Kevin Morby's new album is unlike anything he's done before. Gone is the guitar (for the most part) from his earlier recordings. In its place are more droning instruments — sounds more suited for church than the concert hall, including a recurring, small choir. The subject for the album is God and our culture's relationship with God, from deep introspection to the trivial, everyday use of that ever-present expression "oh my God." The origins of his album Oh My God began in 2016 with events at...

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Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton Joins Democratic Race For President

Updated at 9:53 a.m. ET Massachusetts Rep. Seth Moulton is joining the large 2020 Democratic presidential field, touting a record of military service, bucking his party and arguing for younger leadership. "The greatest generation saved our country from tyranny. It's time for our generation to step up and do the same," Moulton said in an announcement video posted early Monday. His opening message highlights issues from the economy, including advancing jobs to combat climate change, cutting...

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Elizabeth Warren Wants To Erase Most Student Loan Debt

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren has issued another big policy proposal as part of her campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination in 2020. This one concerns higher education. Warren proposes that the federal government write off hundreds of billions of dollars in existing student loan debt. The amount of debt that would be eligible for forgiveness would vary by income, but an independent expert analysis submitted as part of her plan suggests that three-quarters of households would...

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Supreme Court Will Hear Cases On LGBTQ Discrimination Protections For Employees

The Supreme Court has accepted three cases that ask whether federal anti-discrimination laws should apply to sexual orientation and gender identity in the workplace, putting the court on track to consider high-profile LGBTQ issues after its next term begins this fall. Two of the cases — Bostock v. Clayton County, Georgia , and Altitude Express, Inc. v. Zarda — were consolidated because both include claims that employers discriminated on the basis of sexual orientation. A third — R.G. & G.R....

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Special K: Ketamine, From Party Drug To Depression Medication

When you picture the drug ketamine, you might think of that stoner you knew in high school or a bunch of people popping pills in neon-lit clubs. But do you ever picture a dentist’s office? Ketamine is often used as an anesthetic for procedures on peoples teeth. And its a multi-tasker. The Food and Drug Administration recently approved Spravato, a drug based on ketamine, called esketamine, to treat depression via a nasal spray. Heres more about the FDAs designation from The Verge : The drug...

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Anaïs Mitchell's 'Hadestown' Musical Makes Its Broadway Debut

More than a decade ago, Anaïs Mitchell was running late for one of her shows. The singer-songwriter, in her 20s at the time, was trying to get from one gig to another and found herself lost. Along the drive, a song lyric popped into her head. "The lines that came were, 'Wait for me I'm coming. In my garters and pearls with what melody did you barter me from the wicked underworld,'" she remembers. Those lyrics never made it into one of Mitchell's productions, but as the musician says, they...

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Most Teachers Don't Teach Climate Change; 4 In 5 Parents Wish They Did

More than 80% of parents in the U.S. support the teaching of climate change. And that support crosses political divides, according to the results of an exclusive new NPR/Ipsos poll: Whether they have children or not, two-thirds of Republicans and 9 in 10 Democrats agree that the subject needs to be taught in school. A separate poll of teachers found that they are even more supportive, in theory — 86% agree that climate change should be taught. These polls are among the first to gauge public...

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After Democrats Surged In 2018, Republican-Run States Eye New Curbs On Voting

After high turnout in last year's midterm elections propelled Democrats to a new House majority and big gains in the states, several Republican-controlled state legislatures are attempting to change voting-related rules in ways that might reduce future voter turnout. In Texas, state lawmakers are considering adding criminal penalties for people who improperly fill out voter registration forms. Arizona Republicans are proposing new voting rules that could make it more complicated to cast an...

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Reach Out: Ways To Help A Loved One At Risk Of Suicide

If you or someone you know may be considering suicide, contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 (En Español: 1-888-628-9454; Deaf and Hard of Hearing: 1-800-799-4889) or the Crisis Text Line by texting HOME to 741741. If you know someone struggling with despair, depression or thoughts of suicide, you may be wondering how to help. Most Americans say that they understand that suicide is preventable and that they would act to help someone they know who is at risk,...

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Scientists Dig Into Hard Questions About The Fluorinated Pollutants Known As PFAS

Scientists are ramping up research on the possible health effects of a large group of common but little-understood chemicals used in water-resistant clothing, stain-resistant furniture, nonstick cookware and many other consumer products. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances are generally referred to by their plural acronym, PFAS . PFAS are resistant to water, oil and heat, and their use has expanded rapidly since they were developed by companies in the mid-20th century. Today, PFAS' nonstick...

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Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

Mountain Stage, Saturday at 6:00 p.m.

Join us to hear The Lone Bellow (pictured above), Over the Rhine, Anna Tivel, Scott Mulvahill, and Adam Remnant in live performance Saturday night on Mountain Stage.

Hear NPR's 1A on WPSU, Weekdays at 1:00 p.m.

Host Joshua Johnson leads an insightful daily discussion with culture makers and thought leaders about politics and policy, culture, and whatever else is driving the most provocative dialogue that day

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Saturdays at 7:00am: “Planet Money” and “How I Built This” are two half-hour shows that together make a one-hour weekly program on business and entrepreneurship from NPR.

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Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.