Over one hundred community members came out to celebrate State College's first Pride parade on Saturday, June 12.
Jade Campos / WPSU

State College Celebrates Pride With Car Caravan

Neighborhoods were greeted with car honks and rainbow balloons as decorated cars traveled through State College for the borough’s first Pride parade on Saturday. The event fell on the fifth anniversary of the Pulse Nightclub shooting. The car parade started at State College Area High School and ended with a gathering at Sidney Friedman Park. Many community members, including mayoral candidate Ezra Nanes, were excited to see a Pride event unfold in State College. “This is the start of...

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The Democracy Works team recording the season finale.
Photo Provided

 We end this season the way it began, with a roundtable discussion on the state of American democracy. In this episode, Democracy Works hosts Michael Berkman, Chris Beem and Candis Watts Smith reflect on the January 6 insurrection, the one-year anniversary of George Floyd's death, and the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Massacre.

State College Celebrates Pride With Car Caravan

12 hours ago
Over one hundred community members came out to celebrate State College's first Pride parade on Saturday, June 12.
Jade Campos / WPSU

Neighborhoods were greeted with car honks and rainbow balloons as decorated cars traveled through State College for the borough’s first Pride parade on Saturday. The event fell on the fifth anniversary of the Pulse Nightclub shooting.

  

The car parade started at State College Area High School and ended with a gathering at Sidney Friedman Park.

 

Many community members, including mayoral candidate Ezra Nanes, were excited to see a Pride event unfold in State College.

 

Barry Brecheisen / Invision/AP

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues show as aired on June 12, 2021 and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear tracks from John Butler Trio, Pete Wingfield, Tom Hanway & Vassar Clements, Hoots & Hellmouth, Gil Scott-Heron, Alice Gerrard & Hazel Dickens, David Bromberg Quartet, Mississippi John Hurt, Taj Mahal, Russel Garcia, Elizabeth Mitchell, Johnny Winter, and more.

Dave Martin / AP

An archive recording of the WPSU Jazz Show (from home edition) as broadcast on June 11, 2021, and hosted by Greg Petersen. 

In the first hour, hear Boz Scaggs, Asleep At The Wheel, Cowboy Junkies with Elvis Costello, Dexter Gordon, Diana Krall, Ella Fitzgerald, The Jacques Loussier Trio, Tony Bennett, and more.

In the second hour, hear Wayne Wallace Latin Jazz Quintet with Jackie Ryan, Wycliffe Gordon, Bill Evans Trio, Freddy Cole, Gene Krupa, Gerry Mulligan, Jeremy Davenport, Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson, and more.    

Judy Grisel

On this episode of Take Note, we talk with Judy Grisel, a professor of psychology at Bucknell University. Grisel does research in addiction at the university after experiencing addiction as a teenager. It motivated her to write her 2019 book "Never Enough."

Here is the interview:

Periodical cicadas on flower leaves.
Anne Danahy / WPSU

 

It can be hard to grasp that as many as 1.5 million cicadas can turn up on one acre of land. That is, until you hear them.

 

“They get so loud, you can hear them over the sound of the mower,” said Bret Satzler, referring to the sound coming from the periodical cicadas filling the trees in his yard, the wooded area behind it and just about everywhere you can think of.

 

“Caveat Emptor: The Secret Life of an American Art Forger" by Ken Perenyi gives readers an inside look at some of the more obscure, and less than honorable, aspects of the art world.

Pa. GOP Proposes Major Election Overhaul, Including Stricter Voter ID And In-Person Early Voting

Jun 10, 2021
The legislation is sure to draw intense scrutiny and will likely face steep obstacles as Republican leaders, who control both chambers of the state legislature, try to keep their party unified while also winning the approval of Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf.
Tom Gralish / Philadelphia Inquirer

This article is made possible through Votebeat, a nonpartisan reporting project covering local election integrity and voting access. This article is available for reprint under the terms of Votebeat’s republishing policy.

Gov. Tom Wolf, a Democrat, cannot veto the measure.
Charles Fox / Philadelphia Inquirer

Spotlight PA is an independent, nonpartisan newsroom powered by The Philadelphia Inquirer in partnership with PennLive/The Patriot-News, TribLIVE/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, and WITF Public Media. Sign up for our free newsletters.

Andrae Holsey is the new President of Blair County Chapter of NAACP.
Courtesy of Andrae Holsey

 

The Blair County Chapter of the NAACP has named a new leader and a slate of new officers, after longtime president Don Witherspoon passed away and three other senior positions were vacated.

 

WPSU’s Min Xian talks with the new President and CEO, Andrae Holsey, about his background and his visions for the role.

Here’s the conversation:

Min Xian: Andrae Holsey, thank you for joining us. 

Andrae Holsey: Absolutely. It's my honor and my pleasure. 

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NPR Stories

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Some countries are seeing record levels of new daily cases with low vaccination rates.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

I've been lucky to have this column — I grew up reading my way through the stacks at the Richland County Public Library and never gave a moment's thought to the timing of new book releases. These reviews have afforded me the privilege of enjoying many stories set in and around the time they are let out into the world. As suggested by the title, Hannah Reynolds's The Summer of Lost Letters is very much a summer book, set in late June and loaded with fat hydrangeas, sparkling water, and sizzling hot days.

The first results from a large efficacy study of a new kind of COVID-19 vaccine are now out, and they are good. Very good.

According to Novavax, the vaccine's manufacturer, it had a 100% efficacy against the original strain of the coronavirus and 93% efficacy against more worrisome variants that have subsequently appeared.

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A Lobster Diver In Cape Cod Says A Humpback Whale Scooped Him Up And Spat Him Out

A commercial lobster diver says he escaped relatively unscathed after nearly being swallowed by a humpback whale, in a biblical-sounding encounter that whale experts describe as rare but plausible. Michael Packard, 56, said in local interviews and on social media that he was diving off the coast of Provincetown, Mass., on Friday morning when the whale suddenly scooped him up. "I was in his closed mouth for about 30 to 40 seconds before he rose to the surface and spit me out," Packard later...

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The Justice Department Watchdog Will Review A Trump-Era Probe Of Democratic Lawmakers

Updated June 11, 2021 at 3:47 PM ET The Justice Department inspector general will review the Trump administration's seizure of metadata from Apple products belonging to at least two Democratic lawmakers, their staff and family members. In 2018, the Trump Justice Department took the highly unusual step of subpoenaing Apple to obtain the metadata of members of the House Intelligence Committee as well as their current and former staff, and even family, including a minor, according to a committee...

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Rural Communities Fall Further Behind In COVID-19 Vaccination Rates

Rural communities outside America's cities are falling further behind in the race to vaccinate against COVID-19 as President Joe Biden's Fourth of July goal to reach 70% of American adults looms over the horizon. Alaska is the sole state where average rural rates of fully vaccinated people have grown faster than urban rates since April 19, when every state opened shots to anybody 16 and older, according to NPR's latest analysis of county-level vaccination data from the Centers for Disease...

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Detectives Just Used DNA To Solve A 1956 Double Homicide. They May Have Made History

It was only three days into 1956 when three boys from Montana, out for a hike on a normal January day, made a gruesome discovery they were unlikely to ever forget. During a walk near the Sun River, they found 18-year-old Lloyd Duane Bogle, dead from a gunshot wound to the head. They found him on the ground near his car, and someone had used his belt to tie his hands behind his back, according to a report from the Great Falls Tribune . The next day brought another disturbing discovery: A...

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Congress Urged To Act As States Start Allowing Outside Cash For Student Athletes

College sports are about to change dramatically and Congress needs to act quickly in order to ensure fairness. That was the message Wednesday on Capitol Hill, at a lengthy senate hearing about new state laws that'll allow college athletes to make money off the use of their name, image and likeness. The money would not be from the athlete's school. On July 1, at least five state laws go into effect, allowing college athletes to, among other things, get paid for endorsements, personal...

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A Special Series for Pride Month

Friday nights: June 11, 18 & 25 at 8 p.m. on WPSU-FM. In a special three-part series, “Trans in the Eyes of God,” we’ll hear personal stories of transgender people of faith.

Celebrate NPR's 50th Anniversary

Your sustaining membership helps to sustain WPSU, one of the member stations that, in turn, sustains NPR. Please consider becooming a sustaining member at the link below. Thank you!

Folk Season Is here on WPSU-FM

Now that the Metropolitain Opera radio season has ended, Saturday afternoon Folk Show is back on WPSU for the summer and fall. Listen for The Folk Show Saturdays from 1-5pm & Sunday nights at 10:00.

COVID-19 Coverage

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Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings from 8:00 to 10:00; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings from 5:00 to 6:00 on WPSU-FM.

Pandemic, Year One: Personal Reflections

We asked our listeners how their lives have changed since the pandemic began a year ago. You'll find their stories, and all of our COVID-19 coverage at wpsu.org/covid19.

It's Been a Minute

Saturday evenings at 6:00: Join host Sam Sanders for a lively discussion to catch up on the week's news and more, from NPR.

WPSU Digital Shorts

Check out WPSU's short digital stories highlighting the arts, culture, science and activities in central Pennsylvania and beyond.

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Saturdays at 11:00 a.m. on WPSU, “Planet Money” and “How I Built This” are two half-hour shows that together make a one-hour weekly program on business and entrepreneurship from NPR.

Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

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Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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