Graham Spanier and Jerry Sandusky
Gene J. Puskar / AP

Former Penn State President Spanier Loses Criminal Appeal

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Penn State president Graham Spanier lost an appeal Tuesday of his misdemeanor conviction for child endangerment over his handling of a 2001 complaint about Jerry Sandusky showering with a boy in the football team locker room. A Superior Court majority rejected Spanier's claims that too much time had passed to charge him, he was not legally obligated to care for the boy, and should not have been charged because he did not supervise children directly. "To hold that...

Read More

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Sandra Yohe talks with her mother Marie Breon about her life, and how she met her husband.  

WPSU's Beyond the Classroom examines innovative student learning that isn't bound by university walls. Penn State University is embracing this concept in an initiative it's calling "Engaged Scholarship." WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports the inaugural Engaged Scholarship Symposium was held at the Nittany Lion Inn yesterday.

SaveSave

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Jim Zubler and Andrea Ferich talk to Nicholas Brink about his time in central Pennsylvania starting with when he moved here in 1970 to take a job at Penn State. Brink had already been active in the civil rights movement while he was working on a PhD at UCLA.  

Pyramid
Steven Granich

  WPSU's Beyond the Classroom is our series featuring students engaging in hands-on experiences outside university walls. Today, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner takes us to Lock Haven University, where a group of students are traveling abroad as a class. The university will soon require all students to fulfill a global awareness requirement.

Why is hunger still a widespread problem in a world of plenty? WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talks about that with activist and journalist Roger Thurow. He's the author of Enough: Why the World's Poorest Starve in the Age of Plenty and The Last Hunger Season. Thurow visited Penn State's School of International Affairs in February.

SaveSave

WPSU's Beyond the Classroom is our series featuring students engaging in hands-on experiences outside university walls. Today, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner takes us to Lock Haven University, where a group of students are traveling abroad as a class. The university will soon require all students to fulfill a global awareness requirement.

In case you were wondering what Ethiopian Pop music of the 60’s & 70’s would sound like blended with jazz and funk - . wonder no more! WPSU’s Kristine Allen says the answer can be found when Debo Band plays a concert in the Juniata Presents Series at Juniata College in Huntingdon.

Additional Links:

StoryCorps
Emily Reddy / WPSU

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Robert Brown interviewed his son Jimmy, who loves history and has won a number of awards for his history presentations.

StoryCorps pair
Emily Reddy

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Curt Bierly and his son Stan talk about the family business, Stanley C. Bierly, in Millheim.

Across the country, budget cuts continue to cripple libraries. For WPSU, Melissa Bierly reports on one central Pennsylvania community’s effort to keep their library open.

Pages

NPR Stories

At the World Cup in Russia, it finally happened.

It took a record 37 matches, but Tuesday at Luzhniki Stadium in Moscow, Denmark and France played to a scoreless tie. Or if you want to sound like someone who knows futbol, a nil-nil draw.

Sallie Krawcheck, formerly a senior Wall Street executive at Sanford Bernstein, Citigroup and Bank of America, recently founded Ellevest, an investing platform for women. We invited her to play a game of overrated/underrated and weigh in on everything from the gender pay gap to South Carolina barbecue to the scourge of the standing desk.

Reality Winner, the former NSA contractor accused of leaking classified documents to a news site last summer, has accepted a bargain with prosecutors and pleaded guilty in federal court.

Winner, 26, was charged with violating the Espionage Act. She was accused of leaking documents that described Russian efforts to penetrate American election systems.

Her plea bargain calls for her to serve 5 years and 3 months in prison, with 3 years' supervised release, Georgia Public Broadcasting's Stephen Fowler reports. The deal still needs to be approved by a judge.

Turner V. Stokes' favorite outfit was when he was wearing — as he liked to say — nothing but a smile.

The 90-year-old leader of various nudist organizations died Saturday from prostate cancer in Nanjemoy, Md.

Born in Washington, D.C., in 1927, Stokes enlisted in the Navy in 1945 and later worked for military contractors testing electronic equipment.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

Get More NPR News

Divided Supreme Court Upholds Nearly All Of Texas GOP Redistricting Plan

A bitterly divided Supreme Court on Monday upheld the redrawing of congressional and state legislative maps in Texas. The decision reversed earlier court findings that intentional racial discrimination had infected the way that some statehouse and congressional districts were drawn — and came five years to the day after the high court struck down a key provision of the Voting Rights Act . "Our legislative maps are legal" The Texas decision comes in a case that has lasted so long and is so...

Read More

Doctors Try Genetically Modified Poliovirus As Experimental Brain Cancer Treatment

A genetically modified poliovirus may help some patients fight a deadly form of brain cancer, researchers report. The experimental treatment seems to have extended survival in a small group of patients with glioblastoma who faced a grim prognosis because standard treatments had failed, Duke University researchers say. "I've been doing this for 50 years and I've never seen results like this," says Dr. Darell Bigner , the director emeritus of the The Preston Robert Tisch Brain Tumor Center at...

Read More

FDA Green Lights Marijuana-Based Pharmaceutical Drug

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a marijuana-derived drug for the treatment of two rare and serious forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, that begin in childhood but can persist in adulthood. The drug is made from purified cannabidiol, or CBD, a compound found in the cannabis plant. The drug will be marketed under the brand name Epidiolex. CBD has medicinal effects, but it does not cause the mind-altering high that comes from THC, the primary...

Read More

Fake News: An Origin Story

"Fake news" is a phrase that may seem specific to our particular moment and time in American history. But Columbia University Professor Andie Tucher says fake news is deeply rooted in American journalism. The first newspaper published in North America got shut down in 1690 after printing fabricated information. Nineteenth-century newspapers often didn't agree on basic facts. In covering a lurid murder in 1836, one major newspaper implicated the man who'd been accused of the crime, while a...

Read More

AP Report: Algeria Expelling Thousands Of Migrants Into Sahara, With Deadly Effect

Updated at 5:45 p.m. ET In the past 14 months, Algeria has either expelled or turned away more than 13,000 migrants and forced them to walk into the Sahara, according to a new report by The Associated Press . The news service says an increasing number of men, women and children expelled by Algeria have been sent into the desert, sometimes at gunpoint. In the Sahara, they must walk for miles to the nearest tiny town with a water source or get picked up by U.N. rescuers as they wander...

Read More

To Remember Rosewood, An Effort To Turn Its Last House Into A Museum

Only one house exists in an area formally known as the town of Rosewood, which in 1923 was a thriving African-American community until a dispute led to a massacre of at least eight people, and the town was burned and destroyed. The house is now for sale, and Edward Gonzalez-Tennant   ( @gonzaleztennant ), a visiting lecturer at the University of Central Florida, is part of an effort to turn the house into a museum and memorial for the African-American community that was chased out of the town...

Read More

How To Find The Summer Constellations (360° Video)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EieqUGAJHMw Once, the sky was full of stories. Ancient cultures filled the heavens with heroes and monsters, and spent nights telling epics and memorizing patterns in the stars. These days, the stars are a little less familiar. Our skies are full of light pollution and, usually, obscured by a sturdy roof. But if you can get away from the city lights, you can still find a handful of the 88 officially recognized constellations with the help of this video guide ,...

Read More

Oakland Church Steps Out On Faith And Pledges To Stop Calling Police

Nichola Torbett has been thinking a lot recently about what it means to be safe and who gets to feel safe. "I feel, as a white woman, a right to feel comfortable, because the world is kind of made and designed for white people," Torbett said. "So when I don't feel comfortable, I think oh my gosh, I'm not safe." Torbett is a lay leader at First Congregational Church of Oakland, a progressive church in California, that has made a decision to try to stop calling police, especially on people of...

Read More

How Data Analysis Is Driving Policing

Police have always relied on data — whether push pins tracking crimes on a map, mug shot cards, or intelligence files on repeat offenders. The problem with all that information is that it has traditionally been slow and hard to use. "I would have to log into 19 different databases," says Los Angeles Police Department Deputy Chief Dennis Kato. "I'd log in, print out all the tickets that were written to you, and lay them on my desk. Then I'd go and run your criminal history on another database,...

Read More

Beep Beep, Yeah! Paul McCartney On Corden's 'Carpool Karaoke' Is TV At Its Best

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QjvzCTqkBDQ By now, James Corden has set a very high standard with his Carpool Karaoke TV pieces. Only a million or two viewers watch him on CBS' The Late Late Show when it's broadcast, but YouTube and other social media sites extend Corden's reach phenomenally. When he was in London two years ago, Corden took Adele on a karaoke car ride, and their spontaneous singalong and conversation has been viewed on YouTube — as of this week — almost 182 million times....

Read More

Pediatrician Who Exposed Flint Water Crisis Shares Her 'Story Of Resistance'

In August 2015, Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha was having a glass of wine in her kitchen with two friends, when one friend, a water expert, asked if she was aware of what was happening to the water in Flint, Mich. Hanna-Attisha, a pediatrician in Flint, knew that the city had changed its water source the previous year. Instead of channeling water from the Great Lakes, residents were now drinking water from the nearby Flint River. She had been aware of some problems with bacteria after the switch, but...

Read More

Do Trump's Endorsements Move Voters? Tuesday Will Test His Electoral Mojo

Two of the things President Trump likes most are winning and loyalty, and both have clearly been on his mind as he's doled out prized political endorsements this year. For candidates this cycle in a Republican primary, winning Trump's endorsement is political gold. It can push them over the finish line in a tough race, and it gives the president a chance to claim credit for their victories and get some of the glory. But the president has had a mixed record of picking winners and losers since...

Read More

Customs And Border Agency Halts Many 'Zero Tolerance' Detentions, Citing Workload

Updated at 1:42 p.m. ET Despite pressure from President Trump for the U.S. to arrest and prosecute anyone caught crossing the border illegally, U.S. Customs and Border Protection says its agents will temporarily suspend the practice of detaining adults who arrive with children — something that had been a tenet of Trump's "zero tolerance" policy. CBP agents will no longer refer migrant parents and children for prosecution when they're caught at the U.S. southern border, Commissioner Kevin...

Read More

Oscar's Academy Invites 928 New Members, Getting Closer To Diversity Goals

Following through on promises to finally diversify the rank and file of the Academy of Motion Pictures, the Oscar-granting body has invited a record number of 928 new members , making the 2018 class the largest in history. The invitations, issued Monday to an array of people involved in the film industry across 59 countries, are part of the Academy's stated mission to include more women and more people of color after the 2014 and 2015 #OscarsSoWhite controversies, which essentially shut-out...

Read More

PHOTOS: Saudi Women Start Driving, But Activists Remain Jailed

As women in Saudi Arabia took the wheel just after midnight Sunday – the first time they could legally do so in the kingdom — it marked the end of the country's longstanding ban on female drivers. The mood was celebratory: New drivers blared music from their cars. Social media lit up with jubilant photos and videos, and traffic police in some Saudi cities presented women drivers with flowers. Even from afar, Aseel al-Hamad, the first woman to become a member of the Saudi Arabian Motorsport...

Read More

The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

Get The New Free WPSU App!

Take public media anywhere you go with the WPSU mobile app available for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android and Amazon devices.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

Folk Season Is Back on WPSU-FM

Join us for a mix of lovingly hand-curated, locally-hosted folk music Saturday afternoons from 1:00-5:00pm and Sunday nights from 10:00pm to midnight on The Folk Show WPSU-FM.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

On-Air Schedule

Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

WPSU Podcasts

Subscribe to our podcasts and stay on top of your world with WPSU.

Add your voice!

Write an essay for WPSU's This I Believe or BookMark.

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.