After Months Of Focus On Just 2 States, Candidates Scramble To Appeal To 2 More

New Hampshire prides itself on surprising people with the outcome of its first-in-the-nation presidential primary. This year, though, the top winner in each party was the candidate the polls had long predicted would win.So if there was any surprise, it was that the candidates those polls had been smiling on were Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders. Less than a year ago, neither would have been thought a likely candidate, let alone a plausible winner.Trump has been a man of uncertain party...
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Pa. Senate Votes Against Removing AG Kane

1 hour ago
Kathleen Kane
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Pennsylvania senators have failed to muster enough votes to remove state Attorney General Kathleen Kane from office. It's a win for the embattled prosecutor who's fighting criminal charges she leaked secret grand jury material.

The Senate voted 29-19 on Wednesday in favor of a resolution that asserted there was reasonable cause to direct Gov. Tom Wolf to remove Kane on grounds that her lack of an active law license makes it impossible to perform her duties.

But it needed a two-thirds majority of the 50-seat Senate.

2 Pennsylvania Women Test Positive For Zika Virus

5 hours ago
mosquito
Felipe Dana, File / AP Photo

State health authorities say two female Pennsylvania residents have tested positive for the Zika virus.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health says the two had recently traveled to countries affected by the ongoing outbreak of the mosquito-borne virus.

Secretary of Health Dr. Karen Murphy said officials are concerned about the health of those individuals and others who may be exposed, but the want to emphasize that the two cases "pose no threat to the public."

Gov. Tom Wolf giving budget address to full room.
Chris Knight / AP Photo

Democratic Governor Tom Wolf offered up some tough talk for the GOP-controlled state Legislature in his second budget address, scarcely mentioning the details of his proposed $33.3 billion plan.

“Usually this speech is an opportunity to lay out an ambitious agenda for the year ahead,” Wolf said. “But I can’t give that speech. Not under these circumstances.”

Wolf’s proposal calls for $2.7 billion in new and higher taxes to close a budget gap and funnel more money into education, human services, and mandated spending.

Gov. Tom Wolf Unveils 2016-17 Budget Proposal

Feb 9, 2016
Gov. Tom Wolf, with Rep. Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny and Lt. Gov. Mike Stack behind him.
Chris Knight / AP Photo

Gov. Tom Wolf warned lawmakers on Tuesday that Pennsylvania's finances are a ticking time bomb amid a record-long budget gridlock, sending them a spending proposal for the coming fiscal year with no full plan in place for the fiscal year that began back in July.

Lock Haven Students Rally For State Funding

Feb 8, 2016
Pennsylvania State Capitol Building
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Students and faculty from state-owned universities across the state traveled to Harrisburg to advocate for increased funding for the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

Lock Haven University students and faculty wearing the school’s colors boarded a bus to the state capitol on Monday. The state system’s faculty union sponsored a bus for each state-owned university to send students, faculty and alumni to advocate for more state funding for higher education.

minds-eye

  

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as aired on February 6, 2016 and hosted by Max Spiegel with special guest host Sister Sylvie of sister station WKPS-FM. 

 In the first hour, hear tracks from Guy Davis, The Black Keys, Maria Muldaur, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Sunhouse, Etta James, Swamp Cabbage, Ry Cooder, Paul Kantner and Marty Balin, Jefferson Airplane, and more.  

In the second hour, hear Champion Jack Dupree, Doc Watson, Bob Weir, Robert Johnson, Jimi Hendrix Experience, Steve Miller Band, The Shack Shakers, The White Stripes, and more.   

Greg Petersen

An archive recording for the WPSU Jazz show as aired on February 5, 2016, produced and hosted by Craig Johnson. The recording features a Jazz@ThePalmer recording of the Dan Yoder Quartet, as performed in August 2015. 

According to the Treatment Advocacy Center, more individuals with mental illness are in America’s jails and prisons than in residential mental health care facilities.  Many are  there for nonviolent offenses.  Why is the criminal justice system becoming our de facto mental health care provider?  And how can we improve the outcomes when law enforcement and other first responders encounter individuals with mental illness who are in crisis?  Tracy Small answers those questions and more.  She's program coordinator of the Crisis Intervention Team, or CIT, for the Centre Region.

This I Believe: I Believe In Community

Feb 4, 2016
Essayist Ben Wideman
Erin Cassidy Hendrick / WPSU

August 28th, 2012 was the most difficult day of my life. That morning at work, I received a call from my wife. She was nearing full term of her pregnancy with our second child. She had recently been to the doctor who gave her a clean bill of health, and we were excitedly preparing to welcome this new child into our home.

I picked up the phone and she wasted no time saying “Come home now. Something's wrong.”

Matt Rourke / AP File Photo

 

"Regardless of where you come down on that fight, the work needs to get done." 

That's state Auditor General Eugene DePasquale's take on Governor Wolf's push to dissolve the Public Employees' Retirement Commission.

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NPR Stories

Former Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca, who has been embroiled in a scandal involving reports of prisoner abuse and an alleged conspiracy to cover it up, has agreed to plead guilty to making false statements, the Department of Justice announced Wednesday.

The single count against him relates to statements made regarding a federal investigation into corruption and violence at LA County jails. Baca has confessed to lying multiple times when he said he did not know about the actions of those within his department. He was still serving as sheriff at the time.

Humans have long turned to the dog for its nose, especially in its ability to hunt, track missing people, and search for drugs.

But there is a new challenge: Bomb-detecting dogs have to now learn to find the increasingly common Improvised Explosive Devices (IED) that can be assembled from ingredients that are not dangerous by itself.

"So we're now asking dogs not just to find a needle in a haystack – now the problem is more like saying to the dog 'we need you to find any sharp object in the haystack,' " says Clive Wynne, a professor at Arizona State University.

Talking to some Hong Kong residents, you might think their territory was under siege. Their press is censoring itself. Its judiciary is required to be "patriotic." Even their mother tongue, Cantonese, is under assault, some believe, from Mandarin speakers to the north.

Now add academic freedom to that list, as pro-democracy and pro-Beijing camps have rushed to take sides in an ongoing battle over leadership of the territory's oldest institution of higher learning, the University of Hong Kong.

A Fix For Gender-Bias In Animal Research Could Help Humans

6 minutes ago

There's been a male tilt to biomedical research for a long time.

The National Institutes of Health is trying to change that and is looking to bring gender balance all the way down to the earliest stages of research. As a condition of NIH funding, researchers will now have to include female and male animals in their biomedical studies.

As late as the 1990s, researchers worried that testing drugs in women who could be pregnant or become pregnant might lead to birth defects, so experimental drugs were mainly tested in men. Research in animals followed the same pattern.

The Justice Department says it is considering taking legal actions against the city of Ferguson, Missouri, after Ferguson city councilors unanimously voted last night to amend and potentially gut a negotiated agreement to reform the city’s police department and municipal court.

The agreement came after the 2014 killing of unarmed black 18-year-old Michael Brown by a white police officer.

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Supreme Court Puts White House's Carbon Pollution Limits On Hold

The heart of the Obama administration's Clean Power Plan is now on hold, after the Supreme Court granted a stay request that blocks the EPA from moving ahead with rules that would lower carbon emissions from the nation's power plants.The case is scheduled to be argued in June, in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. But a decision could be long in coming, particularly if the case winds up in the Supreme Court — meaning that the rules' fate might not be determined...
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Scientists Aflutter Over Gravitational Wave Rumors

Researchers may have detected gravitational ripples from the collision of two black holes, according to rumors circulating in emails and on blogs.The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) is planning a major announcement for Thursday morning. For now, scientists directly involved in the project are staying quiet about what they've seen, but other researchers say it could be a major breakthrough for the fields of physics and astronomy."Everyone's going to be watching; we...
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Video Chat Your Way Into College: How Tech Is Changing The Admissions Process

Before he arrived in Omaha as a doctoral student in computer science, Jason Jie Xiong says, "I didn't even know there was a state called Nebraska."Jie Xiong, 29, who hails from a small city outside Shanghai, had landed a full scholarship at the University of Nebraska to teach and do research. He says he only knew "more famous states like California and New York."He admits he found the program initially "by randomly checking information," but he's quick to add that he's happy there.It's an...
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Bernie Sanders Dines With Al Sharpton In Harlem

The morning after his New Hampshire primary victory, Bernie Sanders made a highly publicized visit to Harlem to dine with Al Sharpton, one of America's most prominent civil rights activists and media personalities.The two dined at Sylvia's, the same New York City restaurant where Sharpton huddled with Barack Obama during his 2008 presidential campaign.Wednesday's meeting was a not-so-subtle recognition of Sanders' pivot to South Carolina and Sanders' effort to broaden his appeal to the state...
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Twitter Tries A New Kind Of Timeline By Predicting What May Interest You

It was a rumor that had many Twitter old-timers up in arms: Twitter is changing its signature structure of real-time posts in reverse chronological order.It's true. The company now says it's got a new algorithm to predict which tweets you might not want to miss. Those selected tweets, minutes or hours old, will display at the top when you log in after an absence. The rest of the tweets below will remain in real-time and reverse chronology.Twitter hopes this will help people feel less...
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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it, and turn it into great public radio programs on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.