White Supremacist Charged With Terrorism Over Murder Of Black Man

Authorities in New York have charged a white supremacist from Baltimore with terrorism over the murder of a black man last week. Police say 28-year-old James Jackson of Baltimore traveled to New York City specifically to kill black men. It was a plan he carried out on Monday, stabbing 66-year-old Timothy Caughman to death on a public street corner, police say. The Associated Press reports that Caughman was remembered "as a gentleman and a good neighbor." Caughman "was alone and collecting...

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Schorle / Creative Commons

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on March 25, 2017, and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first part of the show, hear Keith Schwartz, John Martin, Silk Road Ensemble with Rhiannon Giddens, The Black Keys, Keller Williams, Josh Ritter, Skip James, Nina Simone, and more.  

In the second part, hear Taj Mahall, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGee, The Alabama Shakes, Ry Cooder, The Blind Willies, James Brown, Jorma Kaukonen, Elmore James, Hard Working Americans, Ray Charles, Albert King, The Carolina Choclate Drops and more. 

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

 

 

When playing the slots in Pennsylvania, casinos and gamblers aren't the only ones making money.

The state collects 54 cents for every dollar a player loses in a slot machine.

The state uses most of that money, about 34 cents, for reducing property taxes. The state's horse racing industry gets 11 cents and 5 cents goes to a state economic development trust fund. The remaining 4 cents is split among the communities that host the casino.

WPSU Jazz Archive - March 24, 2017

Mar 25, 2017
Tom Beetz / Creative Commons

 

An archive edition of the WPSU Jazz show as broadcast on March 24, 2017, hosted by Greg Halpin.

In the first hour of the program we feature all new jazz releases from the Eva Kess Group, Josh Lawrence, the Michael Attias Quartet, David Weiss & Point of Departure, Jason Anick & Jason Yeager, Tim Armacost, and Giovanni Mirabassi. 

Graham Spanier
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Penn State president Graham Spanier has been found guilty of one count of child endangerment over his handling of a child sex abuse complaint against retired assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

Jurors on Friday acquitted the 68-year-old Spanier of the other two counts he faced: conspiracy and another count of child endangerment

The verdict comes more than five years after Sandusky was first charged with sexually abusing children.

Fake news stories are posted and relayed on social media—sometimes reaching audiences that rival major news outlets.  A recent Pew Research Center study reveals that fake news stories caused “a great deal of confusion” in the 2016 election. What’s more, many people who see fake-news stories report that they believe them.  Did “fake news” influence the outcome of the presidential election?  And what impact do false or misleading stories have on our democracy?  We’ll discuss that with fake-news expert Craig Silverman, Media Editor of Buzzfeed News.    

Graham Spanier walking up courthouse stairs, surrounded by TV cameras
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- After over 6 hours of discussion and several questions to the judge, the jury in former Penn State President Graham Spanier’s child endangerment case ended its first day of deliberation without a verdict.

They’re deciding if Spanier knowingly endangered children when he and colleagues failed to report football coach Jerry Sandusky’s sexual abuse of children to authorities.

The 12 men and women are reconvening Friday morning. Judge John Boccabella has said he aims to have a decision before the weekend.

BookMark: "Under A Painted Sky" By Stacey Lee

Mar 23, 2017
Bailey Young and the book cover for "Under a Painted Sky."
Emily Reddy / WPSU

In Stacey Lee’s young adult novel "Under a Painted Sky," two fugitives from the law travel west on a journey to find freedom from their pasts. Samantha is wanted as a murderer and Annamae is a runaway slave. The women disguise themselves as men and learn the true meaning of survival in the dangerous West. Along the way, they encounter and befriend three boys, whom they begin to view as their family. They work together to protect each other at all costs on their journey.

Graham Spanier photo on left. Jerry Sandusky photo on right.
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

Lawyers for former Penn State President Graham Spanier have rested without calling any witnesses.

He's facing charges for failing to a report a 2001 incident involving the sexual abuse of a child.

Closing arguments focused on what Spanier knew about Jerry Sandusky. Spanier's lawyers say he was told Mike McQueary saw Jerry Sandusky in a university shower on a Friday night with a boy, and described it as horseplay.

They point out no witness testified that Spanier was told sexual contact occurred between Sandusky and the child.

(photo: WPSU)

The upcoming vote on the GOP health care bill, known as the American Health Care Act, or AHCA, inspired a group of about 35 citizens to gather outside 5th district Congressman Glenn Thompson’s office in Bellefonte on Wednesday afternoon.  They held a variety of homemade signs designed to send a single message: "Vote No."

Psychologist Theresa Welch of Bellefonte said she's concerned about the effect the bill will have on her clients, especially the working poor.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier surrounded by reporters
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- In the Dauphin County Courthouse, the child endangerment case against former Penn State President Graham Spanier is entering its second phase. The prosecution has rested, and now it’s the defense’s turn.

The case will resume Thursday, although it’s unclear who Spanier’s lawyers plan to call and whether the defendant himself will speak. 

The information presented over the last two days has spanned nearly two decades, beginning with Penn State’s first child abuse investigation of Sandusky in 1998.

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I have always found it difficult to explain my family's syncretic faith traditions to both white Americans and to other South Asians. We are Hindu Sindhis, originating from an area around the Indus River, in what is now modern southeast Pakistan. On our home altar, familiar Hindu idols — Lakshmi, Ganesh, Krishna — share space with images of the 10 Sikh gurus and Jhulelal. Jhulelal, a river deity, is not only the patron saint of Hindu Sindhis, but is also revered by Sufi Muslims.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President Trump issued a sweeping executive order on Tuesday that will begin to undo a slew of government efforts to fight global warming.

Among those worrying and watching to see how the executive order plays out are scientists who actually are in favor of exploring bold interventions to artificially cool the climate.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Senator: Treasury Secretary's Plug For 'Lego Batman' May Be Ethical Violation

The ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee is asking a government watchdog to investigate recent remarks by Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin as a possible ethical violation. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., says in a statement Mnuchin's plug for a movie he helped produce signals "a blatant disregard and disrespect to the office he serves and the power it holds." A Treasury spokesman said Mnuchin mentioned the movie during a "light-hearted moment," when directly asked for movie...

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Message To 'Resistors' From Occupy Co-Creator: Stop Protesting. Run For Office

Opponents of President Trump say resistance to his policies is robust, motivated — and here to stay. They point to big demonstrations including January's Women's March and the upcoming Earth Day "March for Science." Occupy Wall Street co-creator Micah White says bravo, but there's just one problem: Big street protests don't work. They're ineffectual, even counterproductive, he says. "We could have large-scale marches for every year of Trump's presidency. It would do nothing!" the activist and...

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Pinkies Up! A Local Tea Movement Is Brewing

On Saturday mornings, the most popular item Minto Island Growers sells at its farmers market booth is not the certified organic carrots, kale or blueberries. It's tea. The farm grows Camellia sinensis , tea plants, on a half-acre plot in Salem, Ore. The tender leaves are hand picked and hand processed to make 100 pounds of organic, small batch tea. The interest is so strong — the loose-leaf black, green and oolong teas sell out within weeks of spring production — that Elizabeth Miller and her...

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Scottish Parliament Backs Bid For New Independence Vote

One day before the U.K. is widely expected to formally begin its departure from the European Union, Scottish lawmakers took another crucial step toward voting on a departure of their own. By a 69-59 vote Tuesday, members of Scottish Parliament backed First Minister Nicola Sturgeon's pursuit of a new independence referendum. The motion grants Sturgeon the authority to negotiate with the U.K. government in London on behalf of Edinburgh, placing Scotland one step closer to granting its voters...

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Attorney General Orders Crackdown On 'Sanctuary Cities,' Threatens Holding Funds

The Justice Department is following through on an executive order to withhold as much as $4.1 billion in federal grants from so-called "sanctuary cities," generally defined as places where local law enforcement limit their cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement. Attorney General Jeff Sessions' appearance at the daily White House briefing is a signal that President Trump wants to move on to one of the issues he's most comfortable talking about — illegal immigration —...

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Watch Pokey LaFarge Perform 'Hard Times Come And Go' Live On Mountain Stage

Don't call it a throwback; call it "American music that never died." With a mix of ragtime, jazz, country blues and Western swing, St. Louis multi-instrumentalist Pokey LaFarge breathes new life (and charm) into traditional roots music. In his third appearance on Mountain Stage , recorded live in Charleston, W.Va., LaFarge leads his six-piece band in a rip-roaring performance of "Hard Times Come And Go." SET LIST "Hard Times Come And Go" Photo: Brian Blauser/ Mountain Stage
Watch more...

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Elon Musk Seen Targeting Human-Computer Link In New Venture

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsixsRI-Sz4 In the past, entrepreneur Elon Musk has described a "neural lace" that could add a symbiotic digital layer to the human brain. In the future, it seems, he'll try to build that device through a new company, Neuralink. Musk, whose name is also tied to ambitious projects in space and electric cars, confirmed the new venture early Tuesday, after it was first reported by The Wall Street Journal . "He hasn't made an announcement, but Neuralink registered...

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Trump Takes Aim At A Centerpiece Of Obama's Environmental Legacy

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies. The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change. It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change. In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency. Standing next to...

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Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

It's clear from the numbers. Google has a diversity problem. For the past few years, the company has publicly shared its workplace makeup in a report detailing the race, gender and ethnicity of each employee hired the previous year. Last year, while the number of black employees went up, they still represented only 2 percent of the company's workforce and Google admitted it fell short of its diversity goal. In one small step to grow those numbers, this summer 25 students from Howard...

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Everybody Lies, And That's Not Always A Bad Thing

When we think about dishonesty, we mostly think about the big stuff. We see big scandals, big lies, and we think to ourselves, I could never do that . We think we're fundamentally different from Bernie Madoff or Tiger Woods. But behind big lies are a series of small deceptions. Dan Ariely, a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University, writes about this in his book The Honest Truth about Dishonesty . "One of the frightening conclusions we have is that what separates...

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Hamtramck, Michigan: An Evolving City Of Immigrants

Pick a street corner in downtown Hamtramck, Mich., and you'll be struck by the incredible mix of cultures crammed into this tiny, 2-square-mile city. A Catholic church across the street from a mosque. Polish pastry shops, sausage factories, and grocery stores promising "the best Polish food, shipping to Eastern Europe," side by side with Bengali clothing shops that sell richly embroidered dresses and headscarves. And you'd be remiss if you didn't stop in the many Yemeni restaurants serving...

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'The Tinder Opera' Creators Hope You Swipe Right On Online Opera

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imvYwZjJX0Q The first opera hit the stage over 400 years ago. More recently, the art form has been adapted to modern media: In the 1920s and '30s, operas were written to be performed on the radio, and in 1951, NBC commissioned Gian Carlo Menotti to compose Amahl And The Night Visitors for television. Now, a company called Rainy Park Opera is creating operas for the internet. The project started over a beer. On one stool: Adam Taylor, a young filmmaker based in...

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What Gave Some Primates Bigger Brains? A Fruit-Filled Diet

Primate brains may have grown larger and more complex thanks to a fruit-filled diet, a new study suggests. The researchers analyzed the brain sizes and diets of over 140 primate species spanning apes, monkeys, lemurs and lorises and found that those who munched on fruit instead of leaves had 25 percent more brain tissue, even when controlling for body size and species relatedness. Take spider monkeys and howler monkeys, for example. They both live in the rain forests of South America in...

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Mind, Matter And Materialism

Science and philosophy have a long, complicated history. Both are human endeavors aimed at articulating the nature of the world. But where the line between them lies depends a lot on perspective and history. Questions that once lay firmly in philosophy's domain have now fully entered the realm of science. Other issues which might seem fully covered by science retain open philosophical questions that either haunt or inform ongoing research (depending on one's viewpoint). One of the persistent...

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Happening Now: A Cake & Icing Challenge To Support WPSU

WPSU-FM's fund drive begins Saturday. But if you donate early and help us reach $10,000, current members of WPSU will ice that cake with another $3,500! So your donation goes farther today. Thanks!

Mike McGrath Visits Central PA

Mike McGrath, host of public radio's You Bet Your Garden, will visit Central PA April 6-8 to host special events for WPSU! For details & tickets, click below.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU Podcasts

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Write an essay for WPSU's This I Believe or BookMark.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

On-Air Schedule

Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

WPSU's series "Reasons to Stay" explores what keeps people in central Pa. On the radio during Morning Edition, and on our multi-media website.

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.