Thirty-three students from Bald Eagle Area High School volunteered to help distribute bottled water to residents of the Snowshoe area.
Min Xian / WPSU

Snowshoe Residents Get Temporarary Relief From Water Crisis With 1,600 Cases Of Bottled Water

Residents in the Snowshoe area received 1,600 cases of free bottled water on Friday as a temporary relief from their water crisis. Residents started showing up at the town’s EMS building early in the morning. For weeks, their water has looked, smelled and tasted abnormal. "Yes, everybody is having the same problem," said Sharon Nilson, the EMS chief and a Snowshoe resident. "For some people, it’s dirt in their lines; for some people, I guess it’s the milky thing. We have some people live up...

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Thirty-three students from Bald Eagle Area High School volunteered to help distribute bottled water to residents of the Snowshoe area.
Min Xian / WPSU

Residents in the Snowshoe area received 1,600 cases of free bottled water on Friday as a temporary relief from their water crisis. 

Residents started showing up at the town’s EMS building early in the morning. For weeks, their water has looked, smelled and tasted abnormal.

"Yes, everybody is having the same problem," said Sharon Nilson, the EMS chief and a Snowshoe resident. "For some people, it’s dirt in their lines; for some people, I guess it’s the milky thing. We have some people live up on Fountain Road that have no water pressure whatsoever.”

All 67 counties in Pennsylvania signed on to a list of seven priorities they hope to achieve in 2018, in a statement released this week by the County Commissioners Association of Pennsylvania. But the local leaders say they cannot achieve their goals alone.

Farmland on the road that runs between Titusville and Corry School Districts.
Kevin McCorry / Keystone Crossroads

In the past, the Keystone Crossroads reporting project, which WPSU is a part of, has looked at the issues facing education in cities. Kevin McCorry is the education reporter and the editor of the project.

photo: NPR

NPR has a brand new weekly, hour-long show called “Hidden Brain."  The program explores the unconscious patterns behind human behavior. It incorporates NPR's signature storytelling style, and the latest scientific research about why we humans do what we do.  The idea started as a series of reports on Morning Edition, then became a podcast, and is now a weekly program.  WPSU’s Kristine Allen spoke with NPR's social science correspondent, Shankar Vedantam. He's the host of the new show, heard Sunday afternoons at 1:00 on WPSU-FM.

Medical marijuana
Cresco Yeltrah

Medical marijuana has been legalized in Pennsylvania. With the changes come new rules and regulations. 

Pennsylvania Safe Access held an information session in the State College Borough Building Thursday evening. Organization founder Christy Billett was there to answer questions.

“Really, it’s just about talking about it. Letting people realize the face to the patient, and that maybe cannabis is better than some of the pharmaceuticals that they’re taking,” Billett said.

Essayist Taylor Mason-Little.
Min Xian / WPSU

My mom recently visited me for the Penn State vs. Michigan game. Since we live in California, she only gets the opportunity to visit once a semester, so we always try to make the most of our time together.

Here, I live in a house with eleven of my close friends. When my mom came to visit, she treated us all to dinner. My friends went out of their way to thank her more than once. At the end of the night, my mom pulled me aside to comment on how polite my friends were and how nice they seemed.

While my mom was taken aback, I wasn’t surprised at all.

The Early Mays  feature Appalachian-inspired songs built on deep country sensibilities, masterful three part vocal harmonies and a sweet old-time sound that includes fiddle, banjo and guitar, and harmonium.   In 2016  they took home the blue ribbon in the Neo-Traditional Band Competition at Clifftop Appalachian String Band Music Festival and this past August appeared on NPR’s Mountain Stage.  Their latest release Chase the Sun climbed to the #1 position on the National Folk-DJ Charts.     We recorded the Early Mays just a few weeks ago, on Dec 9, 2017.

Farmland on the outskirts of the Titusville School District (Kevin McCorry/WHYY)
Kevin McCorry / Keystone Crossroads

They contorted their faces in a howl. With eyes bulging, mouths twisted, veins popping, the Titusville High School senior class, cheerleaders screeching out orders, filled the gymnasium with frenzied intensity as they bellowed out the name of their school mascot, letter by letter — rattling the grandstands and reaching for their maximum decibel.

“What’s that spell?” a girl screamed.

“Rockets!” the seniors answered. “Rockets! Rockets!”

In Performance at Penn State is a monthly hour-long program that showcases performances from Penn State's School of Music. This month, hear cellist Kim Cook play music by Sergei Rachmaninoff from a concert in the Music Penn’s Woods Festival; an instrumental arrangement of “Sunrise, Sunset” from “Fiddler on the Roof,” by Jerry Bock, from that same Penns Woods concert, played by clarinetist Anthony Costa, oboist Timothy Hurtz, and pianist Ann Deighton; and  the Penn State Philharmonic, led by Gerardo Edelstien in Antonin Dvorak’s Symphony No. 8.

original photo: Paul M. Howey

B.J. Leiderman wrote the theme music for many public radio shows, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, Marketplace and Science Friday. After decades in the music business, as a composer and performer, Leiderman has finally released his very first album of songs.  On Take Note, BJ Leiderman talks with WPSU’s Kristine Allen about his album, his obsession with the Beatles, and how to write catchy theme music. We also hear a bit of music from the album.

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NPR Stories

In 1971, Winnette Willis was a 23-year-old single mom in Chicago when she became pregnant again. "I was terrified of having another child," she tells Radio Diaries.

Before the Supreme Court's decision in Roe v. Wade 45 years ago, abortion was illegal in most of the United States, including in Illinois.

Women like Willis who wanted to terminate their pregnancies had limited and often frightening options. She wasn't sure what to do. And then one day, while she was waiting on an L train platform, she saw a sign.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Jurors in eastern Canada on Friday found three men not guilty of criminal negligence following an oil train disaster that left 47 people dead. The accident in July 2013 involved a U.S.-owned train carrying North Dakota crude oil. In the aftermath, regulators in the U.S. and Canada adopted sweeping reforms to the way railroads haul and manage hazardous cargoes.

It's been quite a news week, even by recent standards.

The U.S. is potentially hours away from a partial government shutdown. The debate rages on over the president's reported comments about not wanting to accept immigrants from "s**thole countries." "Girtherism" has erupted over the president's latest height and weight measurements. Officials are scrambling to figure out how to avoid another false ballistic missile alarm, like the one residents of Hawaii suffered last weekend.

The Hotel California was, according to a case filed against it by legendary rock band The Eagles, living it up a little too much. The rock band sued the Mexico-based hotel, which shares a name with the band's iconic 1976 song, resulting in a settlement Thursday. The settlement's terms were not disclosed.

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Open Or Closed? Here's What Happens In A Partial Government Shutdown

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ye4heQO1v0o Updated at 5:08 p.m. ET So, here we go again. The federal government is once more on the verge of a shutdown, and just like the last time, in October 2013, there will some things you'll notice that are shuttered and others you won't. Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney told reporters on Friday that the Trump administration is going to manage the shutdown differently than the last time. "We're not going to weaponize it," he said....

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Justice Department Asks SCOTUS To Reverse Court Ruling Protecting DREAMers

The Justice Department late Thursday announced that it has asked the Supreme Court to overturn a lower court ruling that prevents President Trump from ending the Obama-era program that shields certain young undocumented immigrants from deportation. That program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, also grants work permits to about 700,000 immigrants brought to this country illegally by their parents. In September, Trump rescinded DACA and gave Congress until March to save it. But...

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'It's Not A Fairy Tale, It's Not A Failure': A Mother At 16 Conquers Stigma With Love

A favorite pastime for April Gibson and her teenage son, Gregory Bess, is simply talking to one another. "I think I learn more from those conversations than school," says Gregory, who turned 17 on Thursday. But during a recent StoryCorps conversation in St. Paul, Minn., April, 33, knew he wanted to talk about a subject the two hadn't really explored. April invited her son to ask about what that time was like for her, as a young black mother. "Now you can ask me the hard question," April says....

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Turnover In Trump's White House Is 'Record-Setting,' And It Isn't Even Close

If President Trump's first year in office seemed chaotic from a staffing perspective, there's a reason. Turnover among top-level staff in the Trump White House was off the charts, according to a new Brookings Institution report . Turnover in Trump's first year was more than triple that in former President Barack Obama's first year, and double the rate in President Ronald Reagan's White House. A full 34 percent of high-level White House aides either resigned, were fired or moved into different...

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Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

Updated at 12:39 p.m. ET Health care workers who want to refuse to treat patients because of religious or moral beliefs will have a new defender in the Trump administration. The top civil rights official at the Department of Health and Human Services is creating the Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in procedures like abortion or treat certain people because of moral or religious objections. "Never...

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Scientists Peek Inside The 'Black Box' Of Soil Microbes To Learn Their Secrets

A tablespoon of soil contains billions of microscopic organisms. Life on Earth, especially the growing of food, depends on these microbes, but scientists don't even have names for most of them, much less a description. That's changing, slowly, thanks to researchers like Noah Fierer , at the University of Colorado, Boulder. Fierer think microbes have lived in obscurity for too long. "They do a lot of important things for us, directly or indirectly, and I hope they get the respect they deserve,...

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From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: 2 Therapists Share Stories

Nora Baladerian and Karyn Harvey are both psychologists with an unusual specialty — they are among a small number of therapists who treat people with intellectual disabilities who have been the victims of sexual violence. They're friends, brought together by decades of shared experience. Baladerian, from Los Angeles, is a co-founder of the Disability and Abuse Project , which tracks violence against people with intellectual disabilities. Harvey now works at The Arc Baltimore , a local chapter...

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Cat Lovers, Is Your Cat Right- Or Left-Pawed?

You know your cats' cute habits, their distinct personalities and their likes and dislikes for food, play and affection. But could you say whether your cats are right-pawed or left-pawed? That is, have you noticed which paw they use first to step over a raised object or to step down the stairs? According to a new study published in the January issue of Animal Behaviour , cats show a version of handedness, the lateral bias that means 90 percent of us humans prefer using our right hand for...

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House Intel Panel Votes To Release Its Fusion GPS Transcript

Updated at 3:56 p.m. ET The House Intelligence Committee decided on Thursday to release the transcript of its meeting with the man who commissioned the infamous Trump-Russia dossier. Lawmakers used a closed meeting to vote about whether to unveil the text of hours' worth of testimony by Glenn Simpson, founder of the private intelligence firm Fusion GPS. The committee posted it later in the day and it is available online here . The testimony shows that Simpson gave the committee a road map of...

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Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

We live in an age of heightened awareness about concussions. From battlefields around the world to football fields in the U.S., we've heard about the dangers caused when the brain rattles around inside the skull and the possible link between concussions and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy . A number of high-profile NFL stars have developed CTE, and parents are increasingly worried about how concussions may affect their children who play sports. The injury even...

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Hurricane-Force Winds In Europe Halt Flights, Rip Roofs And Topple Trees

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxuTGPutmxA A powerful storm that brought hurricane-force winds to parts of Western Europe, causing floods, downing trees and halting public transport, has been blamed for at least nine deaths in four countries. The Netherlands, Germany, France and Belgium got the brunt of the unusual storm system. Some areas saw winds up to 126 mph. In Germany, where five people, including two firefighters, were killed, Deutsche Welle reports: "All long-distance trains and...

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Sugar And Sleep: More Rest May Dull Your Sweet Tooth

Listen up, night owls: If you're sleeping six or fewer hours per night, you're not doing your health any favors. A new study finds that getting the recommended seven to nine hours of sleep per night may help you tame your sweet tooth. Researchers at King's College London recruited "short sleepers" — that is, people who routinely sleep less than seven hours per night. The participants were coached on strategies to extend sleep time, such as cutting back on caffeine, reducing screen time and...

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Black Holes: Where Reality Beats Fiction

Last week, the PBS series Nova presented an episode on black holes , these most mysterious and mind-boggling physical objects. Hosted by astrophysicist Janna Levin from Barnard College in New York, the episode was truly fantastic. Very clear science and stunning graphics. Levin was gracious and fun, the kind of benevolent teacher you want for your kids. The text was tight, with the narration closely following the quotes from the many invited guests. And the science, of course, was nothing...

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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

Researchers say they have taken a step toward developing a blood test that would detect eight common cancers, possibly even before symptoms appear. As they report Thursday in the journal Science, they're hoping their idea would eventually lead to a $500 test that can screen for cancer and identify people with the disease when it's in its earliest stages and more treatable. But they have a long way to go. There have been many attempts over the decades to develop blood tests to screen for...

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A Former Neo-Nazi Explains Why Hate Drew Him In — And How He Got Out

Christian Picciolini was 14 years old when he attended the first gathering of what would become the Hammerskin Nation, a violent, white-power skinhead group. Looking back, he describes his introduction to the group as receiving a "lifeline of acceptance." "I felt a sort of energy flow through me that I had never felt before — as if I was a part of something greater than myself," he says. Picciolini embraced the white supremacist message he heard that day and went on to front a white-power...

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What Does It Take To Make A Living Posting Travel Photos On Social Media?

Collette and Scott Stohler gave up their respective careers in engineering and ad production to become travel influencers charging tourism boards, hotels, adventure companies and others a fee to post pictures and videos (mostly of themselves) in the exotic location of the companys choice, on their own social media , under the name Roamaroo . The benefits are unlimited travel and adventure . But its not easy, either. Here & Now s Robin Young learns more from the Stohlers about what it takes...

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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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NPR One: An Award-Winning Cross-Platform Experience

Since launching NPR One in 2014, we've been working to deliver a news and storytelling experience that meets users in all the places they are now and will be in the future. For the Digital Media team, this has meant designing and building focused, yet flexible apps for smartphones, smart TVs, car infotainment systems, wearable devices, voice platforms, and more. That's why we were honored to learn that Google has named NPR One the winner of the 2017 Material Design Award for Platform...

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Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

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Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!