Pakistani al-Qaeda Leader Killed In U.S. Strike In Afghanistan

The Pentagon announced yesterday that it had killed a Pakistani terrorist leader with ties to al-Qaeda and the Pakistani Taliban. In a statement, the Pentagon said that Qari Yasin was killed in a U.S. airstrike on March 19 in Afghanistan's Paktika Province. It said he was a "senior terrorist figure" and that he had plotted the 2009 attack on the Sri Lankan cricket team in Lahore and the 2008 bombing of the Marriott hotel in Islamabad. Reuters reports that Yasin was killed in a drone strike....

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Gorsuch Confirmation Hearings End And The Political Games Begin

Political predictions are a dangerous business, especially this year. But it does look as though one way or another, the U.S. Senate will vote to confirm the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The open question is how much damage Democrats will do to their own long game in the process. The long game is this: confirming Gorsuch will not change the overall liberal-conservative balance on the Supreme Court. But two of the current sitting justices are over 80, and a third...

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WPSU Jazz Archive - March 24, 2017

Mar 25, 2017
Tom Beetz / Creative Commons

 

An archive edition of the WPSU Jazz show as broadcast on March 24, 2017, hosted by Greg Halpin.

In the first hour of the program we feature all new jazz releases from the Eva Kess Group, Josh Lawrence, the Michael Attias Quartet, David Weiss & Point of Departure, Jason Anick & Jason Yeager, Tim Armacost, and Giovanni Mirabassi. 

Graham Spanier
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Penn State president Graham Spanier has been found guilty of one count of child endangerment over his handling of a child sex abuse complaint against retired assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

Jurors on Friday acquitted the 68-year-old Spanier of the other two counts he faced: conspiracy and another count of child endangerment

The verdict comes more than five years after Sandusky was first charged with sexually abusing children.

Fake news stories are posted and relayed on social media—sometimes reaching audiences that rival major news outlets.  A recent Pew Research Center study reveals that fake news stories caused “a great deal of confusion” in the 2016 election. What’s more, many people who see fake-news stories report that they believe them.  Did “fake news” influence the outcome of the presidential election?  And what impact do false or misleading stories have on our democracy?  We’ll discuss that with fake-news expert Craig Silverman, Media Editor of Buzzfeed News.    

Graham Spanier walking up courthouse stairs, surrounded by TV cameras
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- After over 6 hours of discussion and several questions to the judge, the jury in former Penn State President Graham Spanier’s child endangerment case ended its first day of deliberation without a verdict.

They’re deciding if Spanier knowingly endangered children when he and colleagues failed to report football coach Jerry Sandusky’s sexual abuse of children to authorities.

The 12 men and women are reconvening Friday morning. Judge John Boccabella has said he aims to have a decision before the weekend.

BookMark: "Under A Painted Sky" By Stacey Lee

Mar 23, 2017
Bailey Young and the book cover for "Under a Painted Sky."
Emily Reddy / WPSU

In Stacey Lee’s young adult novel "Under a Painted Sky," two fugitives from the law travel west on a journey to find freedom from their pasts. Samantha is wanted as a murderer and Annamae is a runaway slave. The women disguise themselves as men and learn the true meaning of survival in the dangerous West. Along the way, they encounter and befriend three boys, whom they begin to view as their family. They work together to protect each other at all costs on their journey.

Graham Spanier photo on left. Jerry Sandusky photo on right.
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

Lawyers for former Penn State President Graham Spanier have rested without calling any witnesses.

He's facing charges for failing to a report a 2001 incident involving the sexual abuse of a child.

Closing arguments focused on what Spanier knew about Jerry Sandusky. Spanier's lawyers say he was told Mike McQueary saw Jerry Sandusky in a university shower on a Friday night with a boy, and described it as horseplay.

They point out no witness testified that Spanier was told sexual contact occurred between Sandusky and the child.

(photo: WPSU)

The upcoming vote on the GOP health care bill, known as the American Health Care Act, or AHCA, inspired a group of about 35 citizens to gather outside 5th district Congressman Glenn Thompson’s office in Bellefonte on Wednesday afternoon.  They held a variety of homemade signs designed to send a single message: "Vote No."

Psychologist Theresa Welch of Bellefonte said she's concerned about the effect the bill will have on her clients, especially the working poor.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier surrounded by reporters
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- In the Dauphin County Courthouse, the child endangerment case against former Penn State President Graham Spanier is entering its second phase. The prosecution has rested, and now it’s the defense’s turn.

The case will resume Thursday, although it’s unclear who Spanier’s lawyers plan to call and whether the defendant himself will speak. 

The information presented over the last two days has spanned nearly two decades, beginning with Penn State’s first child abuse investigation of Sandusky in 1998.

Gene J. Puskar / AP File Photo

 

This week, former Penn State University president Graham Spanier is in court for his role in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal. This trial is one of the final chapters in a legal saga that has stretched since Sandusky was arrested in 2011. 

But outside the courtroom, the effects of Sandusky's actions are still being felt statewide.

Tim Curley
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) – The primary witnesses for the prosecution are testifying Wednesday in the child endangerment trial of former Penn State President Graham Spanier.

Spanier’s charged with failing to act aggressively enough to prevent football coach Jerry Sandusky from serially abusing young boys.

One of those witnesses—former Penn State Athletic Director Tim Curley—handled the case alongside Spanier, and has already said he wishes he did more.

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NPR Stories

Movie fans know that Hollywood opens its most prestigious films every December, right before the Oscar nomination deadline. The same is true of Broadway — except it happens in the spring, before the Tony nominations come out. This year's is an exceptionally crowded season, with 18 shows — half of them musicals — opening in March and April.

Last season was all about Hamilton. Everyone knew it was going to win the Tony for best musical, but Barry Weissler, who produced Waitress, didn't care.

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Cincinnati Police Say 15 Shot, 1 Killed In Nightclub

A shooting in a Cincinnati nightclub left 15 people wounded, one of them fatally, early on Sunday morning. The number of victims could rise, however, because people were traveling to hospitals on their own, Cincinnati police Capt. Kim Williams said. NBC affiliate WLWT reported that police officers outside the club heard gunshots around 1 a.m., as the Cameo Night Club was closing. Assistant Police Chief Paul Neudigate has tweeted that there was "only one reported shooter," and that police are ...

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Week Of High Expectations Stumbles To New Lows For Team Trump

This was to have been the week when President Trump turned his fledgling presidency around, setting a course for success and letting the wind fill its sails at last. Instead, it became his worst week to date, ending with the ship becalmed and its crew in disarray. After other controversies had spoiled the weather, the Republicans proved unable to muster the votes to pass their repeal-and-replace Obamacare bill in the House. The president and Speaker Paul Ryan had to call off the vote...

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Keeping Calm In London, In Spite Of Terror

Twitter and other social media platforms often seem anti-social: mean, ugly avenues where people bash, blame and fulminate. But this week, just a couple of hours after the terrorist in front of the British Parliament killed four people and wounded scores of others from all over the world, the official U.K. Parliament Twitter account posted a short note of simple nobility: It was a quiet message of defiance; an understated, eloquent way to say: We're still here. Business as usual. The show of...

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'The Resistance' Faces A New Question: What To Do With All That Money

The numbers, in several cases, are astounding. 350.org, a climate action group, saw donations almost triple in the month after Donald Trump's election. Since Trump's win, Planned Parenthood told NPR it's gained over 600,000 new donors and more than 36,000 new volunteers. And the American Civil Liberties Union has raised more than $80 million since November 8th. Key players in what's being called "The Resistance" — a vocal and growing progressive backlash to the Trump presidency — have been...

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Forget F. Scott: In 'Z,' Christina Ricci Tells Zelda Fitzgerald's Story

Christina Ricci's film career began early — at just 10 years old, she played the adorably malevolent Wednesday Addams in The Addams Family . From there, she went on to play fascinating and often dark and damaged characters, making a name for herself as an actress who could tap into complex roles. Ricci's latest project is no exception: She plays Zelda Fitzgerald, wife of author F. Scott Fitzgerald, in Amazon's biographical series Z: The Beginning of Everything . Zelda was known for her beauty...

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Companies And Users Can Do More To Stay Secure With Smart Devices

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pFDoCLf96Kg These days just about every device is "smart." There are smart cars, phones, TVs, grills and speakers, and most people don't think twice about buying a new TV, hooking it up to the internet and giving it access to different apps. But all that connectivity means data is being shared and collected by the devices and the apps used. Earlier this month, Consumer Reports announced a new initiative to create standards for consumer privacy and security...

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Telehealth Doctor Visits May Be Handy, But Aren't Cheaper Overall

Telehealth takes a lot of forms these days. Virtual visits with a health care provider can take place by video, phone or text, or via the Web or a mobile app. The one commonality: You get to consult a doctor from your home, the office, Starbucks or anywhere with a wifi or mobile connection. These appointments can be quick, and save you from having to schlep across town and sit in a waiting room, leafing through year-old Time magazine articles, as prelude to every visit with a doc. There's no...

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Conspiracy Theorist Alex Jones Apologizes For Promoting 'Pizzagate'

Longtime conspiracy theorist and propagator Alex Jones has apologized to the Washington, D.C. pizzeria Comet Ping Pong and its owner James Alefantis for his show's role in promoting the false "pizzagate" conspiracy theory involving a child sex-abuse ring. Jones, the host of the radio and web show bearing his name and the owner of the website Infowars, said from a prepared statement that to his knowledge, "neither Mr. Alefantis, nor his restaurant Comet Ping Pong, were involved in any human...

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A High School's Lesson For Helping English Language Learners Get To College

Sixteen-year-old Na Da Laing struggled in elementary school. "I was different from other students," she remembers. "I couldn't speak English at all." Now, eight years later, she's reading George Orwell's Animal Farm . In the U.S., roughly one in 10 students is an English language learner.
Many schools struggle to help them feel comfortable with their new language. Helping them get ahead and to college is another challenge entirely. But East Allen University, Laing's high school in Fort...

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These 'Women In The Castle' Provide New Perspectives On Nazi Germany

The Women in the Castle , the new novel by Jessica Shattuck, tells the story of three women, and their children, who take refuge in the ruins of a Bavarian castle at the end of World War II. The women are war widows — war resistance widows, really — whose husbands paid with their lives for the July 1944 plot against Adolf Hitler.

Marianne von Lingenfels has promised those who conspired with her husband that she would find and protect their families. But the support they give one...

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QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Global Pandemics And Killer Viruses?

Our global health team has just finished up a series called "What Causes Pandemics? We Do." In radio and online stories, we looked at the causes behind our new hyperinfectious era. We'll continue covering this topic in future stories, but we thought our readers might want a chance to brush up on their pandemic facts. So roll up your sleeves, wash your hands and then try this quiz. Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Sunday Puzzle: Keep The Bookend Letters From These Words To Make New Ones

On-Air Challenge: Take two-word clues that might appear in a crossword. The first and last letters of each answer are the same as the first and last letters of the clue. Example: Football mistake -- FUMBLE (both the clue and the answer start with F and end with E) Snow tool Autumn flower Warm material Stairway toy Math operation Spanish mister Near relative Cable giant Baby's shoe Chipping tool Northeast state Last week's challenge: Think of a familiar phrase in the form "I ___ you," in which...

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Mind, Matter And Materialism

Science and philosophy have a long, complicated history. Both are human endeavors aimed at articulating the nature of the world. But where the line between them lies depends a lot on perspective and history. Questions that once lay firmly in philosophy's domain have now fully entered the realm of science. Other issues which might seem fully covered by science retain open philosophical questions that either haunt or inform ongoing research (depending on one's viewpoint). One of the persistent...

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Mike McGrath Visits Central PA

Mike McGrath, host of public radio's You Bet Your Garden, will visit Central PA April 6-8 to host special events for WPSU! For details & tickets, click below.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

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WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

WPSU's series "Reasons to Stay" explores what keeps people in central Pa. On the radio during Morning Edition, and on our multi-media website.

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.