'Frantic' Search For Survivors After Earthquake In Indonesia Kills Nearly 100

A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck off the coast of Indonesia around 5 a.m. local time on Wednesday, killing nearly 100 people.The death toll is expected to rise as rescue and recovery efforts continue, NPR's Anthony Kuhn reports.The quake was at a relatively shallow depth, just 11 miles under the Earth's surface, Anthony says. Its epicenter was on the coast of Aceh province, the same region where an earthquake triggered a devastating tsunami in 2004.No tsunami warning has been issued...
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An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on December 3, 2016, and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear John Sebastian, Keb' Mo’, Rev. Gary Davis, Jimi Hendrix, Mississippi John Hurt, The Black Keys, The Beatles, Etta James, Bob Dylan, Rory Gallagher, and more.

In hour two, hear Muddy Waters, Tommy Johnson, Arthur Gunter, Leo Kottke, Gil Scott Heron, Tedeschi-Trucks, Led Zepplin, Tad Benoit, Ry Cooder, and more. 

Ray Holley is your host for this episode of the Folk Show.  You’ll hear a wide range of styles and performances on this audio archive of a live radio broadcast.  The two-hour show is divided into two segments, in order to preserve the audio quality.     

Steve Van Hook is your host for this episode of the Folk Show.  You’ll hear a wide range of styles and performances on this audio archive of a live radio broadcast.  The two-hour show is divided into two segments, in order to preserve the audio quality.      

Laurel Zydney is your host for this episode of the Folk Show.  You’ll hear a wide range of styles and performances on this audio archive of a live radio broadcast.  The two-hour show is divided into two segments, in order to preserve the audio quality.   

WPSU Jazz Archive - Dec. 2, 2016

Dec 3, 2016
JBreeschoten / Creative Commons

  

An archive edition of the WPSU Jazz show as hosted by Greg Halpin and broadcast on December 2, 2016. 

The first hour of the program has all new jazz releases from Carl Winther, the Rudy Royston Trio, the Nigel Price Organ Trio, Anthony Branker & Imagine, Lee Konitz & Kenny Wheeler Quartet, Keith Jarrett, Scott Bradlee's Postmodern Jukebox, Macy Gray, and Cameron Mizell. 

Polls show that the overwhelming majority of Americans recognize the urgency of acting on human-induced climate change. Why then haven't we done more as a nation to address the problem?  Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann says politicians are doing the bidding of powerful fossil fuel interests while ignoring the long-term good of the people they’re supposed to represent.

Jose Luis Magana / AP Photo

 

Time is running out for Pennsylvania coal miners. By January 1, 13,000 coal miners could lose their pensions and thousands their health care. Legislation called the Miners Protection Act would avert the loss of benefits, but the U.S. Senate has yet to schedule the bill for a vote.

From T.S. Eliot to Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson to Flannery O’Connor, faith and poetry have long been companions. Each is a guide, in its own way, to grace. In True, False, None of the Above, poet Marjorie Maddox tracks her own relationship with faith and doubt, and the repeated ways in which literature, faith, and students challenge and resurrect her beliefs.

Looking At Addiction As A Health Crisis

Dec 1, 2016
Jessica Kourkounis / Keystone Crossroads

 

For the past 20 years, Rep. Gene DiGirolamo, R-Bucks, has been a vocal advocate for drug and alcohol rehabilitation in Pennsylvania. And he’s been pushing the public and lawmakers to stop looking at addiction as a crime.

“Addiction has to be looked at like a disease and it is, like other diseases, highly treatable, and treatment works,” he said.

women in line at office window
Emily Reddy / WPSU

A presidential recount effort in Centre County has failed. The County Board of Elections denied affidavits submitted by voters in 28 precincts asking that the ballots be reexamined.

Voters can request a recount by affidavit within five days after the closing of the ballot count. Centre County commissioner and elections board member Steve Dershem says the count closed on Nov. 17, so when the voters submitted their affidavits yesterday it was too late.

He says the fact that a recount would have been laborious wasn’t a part of the decision to deny it.

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NPR Stories

Once a day, until Dec. 25, we'll be highlighting a specific small, good thing that happened in popular culture this year. And we do mean small: a moment or image from a film or TV show, a panel from a comic, a brief exchange from a podcast, or a passage from a book.


Ok, yes, it's just the one joke. Fine.

The Department of Labor has guidelines for companies that want to keep unpaid interns. Essentially, unpaid interns have to be treated like students and shouldn't do the work of paid employees.

Those rules, however, don't apply to government agencies.

The fire and feel Lucinda Williams brought to the Lincoln Center stage when she headlined this August concert is informed by 25 years of making music. Deeply informed by tradition, her work remains determinedly individualistic and envelope-pushing.

Every December, Miami's annual Art Basel fair draws artists, dealers and buyers from around the world. This year, dozens of artists could be found not in galleries or at cocktail parties, but painting at an elementary school.

Spanish painter Marina Capdevila was one of more than 30 artists working at Eneida Hartner Elementary School in Miami's Wynwood neighborhood.

When the Japanese struck Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga (then Aiko Yoshinaga) was a senior at Los Angeles High School.

She remembers the day the following spring that her principal took the Japanese students aside and said, "You're not getting your diplomas because your people bombed Pearl Harbor."

Japanese-American families on the West Coast were rounded up and sent to internment camps. Yoshinaga was worried that she would be separated from her boyfriend, so to the horror of her parents, Yoshinaga and her boyfriend eloped.

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Walter Scott Family's Lawyer Says People Shouldn't Lose Hope After Mistrial

Cellphone video showed South Carolina police officer Michael Slager shooting Walter Scott multiple times in the back, leading many African-Americans to view it as the best chance of convicting an officer in one the recent killings of unarmed black men.Because of that, Chris Stewart, the attorney for Scott's family, tells All Things Considered's Ari Shapiro, the family felt it was important to make a statement after Monday's announcement of a hung-jury mistrial."It's not over," Scott's mother,...
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When It Comes To Wealthy Leaders, World Abounds With Cautionary Tales

He was a flamboyant, alpha-male billionaire who said things no career politician ever would — someone who promised to use his business savvy to reform the system and bring back jobs. Voters believed that his great wealth insulated him from corruption, because he couldn't be bought.But his administration was marked by criminal investigations and crony capitalism.Italian Prime Minister Silivo Berlusconi was — until Donald Trump came along — the best known example of a certain type of wealthy...
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Reporter's Notebook: What It Was Like As A Muslim To Cover The Election

Editor's note: There is language in this piece that some will find offensive.Sometime in early 2016 between a Trump rally in New Hampshire, where a burly man shouted something at me about being Muslim, and a series of particularly vitriolic tweets that included some combination of "raghead," "terrorist," "bitch" and "jihadi," I went into my editor's office and wept.I cried for the first (but not the last) time this campaign season.Through tears, I told her that if I had known my sheer...
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Pipeline Protesters, Battered By Blizzard, Vow To Stay

The sun was shining on opponents of the Dakota Access Pipeline on Sunday, when the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced that it would not approve the final and key part of the controversial project. Less than 24 hours later, many of those people were huddling in shelters or trying to escape the rural camp as a brutal winter storm bore down on them.Cars slid off roads and tents were blown over as winds gusted to more than 50 mph, causing near white-out conditions on the short stretch of...
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Are You Of Two Minds? Michael Lewis' New Book Explores How We Make Decisions

We like to think our brains can make rational decisions — but maybe they can't.The way risks are presented can change the way we respond, says best-selling author Michael Lewis. In his new book, The Undoing Project, Lewis tells the story of Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, two Israeli psychologists who made some surprising discoveries about the way people make decisions. Along the way, they also founded an entire branch of psychology called behavioral economics.Lewis is also the author of...
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Supreme Court Upholds Hurricane Katrina Fraud Verdict Against State Farm

The U.S. Supreme Court has upheld a jury verdict finding that State Farm Fire and Casualty Co. defrauded the federal government after Hurricane Katrina hit the Gulf Coast in 2005.In the years before the hurricane, State Farm issued both federal government-backed flood insurance policies and general homeowners policies. After the hurricane, the company ordered its claims adjusters to misclassify wind damage as flood damage to shift liability to the government and spare the insurance company's...
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No, FDR Did Not Know The Japanese Were Going To Bomb Pearl Harbor

Seventy-five years after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, some Americans have never stopped believing that President Franklin Roosevelt let it happen in order to draw the U.S. into World War II."It's ridiculous," says Rob Citino, a senior researcher at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans. "But it's evergreen. It never stops. My students, over 30 years — there'd always be someone in class [who'd say], 'Roosevelt knew all about it.'"Conspiracy theories, half-truths and full-on...
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What Smart Aliens Could Teach Us About Survival

Judging from the deluge of recent movies featuring aliens of all sorts — Dr. Strange, Arrival, the upcoming Star Wars movie Rogue One — we can't help but be fascinated with these imaginary creatures.They live deep in our collective unconscious, mirroring the good and evil we are capable of. In a real sense, the aliens are us. They reflect what we know of the world and ourselves, our expectations and fears, our hopes and despair.But there is something else with aliens, something we rarely...
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Radio Conspiracy Theorist Claims Ear Of Trump, Pushes 'Pizzagate' Fictions

Alex Jones has a following. His radio show is carried on more than 160 stations, and he has more than 1.8 million subscribers on YouTube.And he claims to have the ear of the next president of the United States.Jones is also one of the nation's leading promoters of conspiracy theories — some of which take on lives of their own. He has been a chief propagator of untrue and wild claims about a satanic sex trafficking ring run by one of Hillary Clinton's top advisers out of a pizzeria in...
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Signed Out Of Prison But Not Signed Up For Health Insurance

Before he went to prison, Ernest killed his 2-year-old daughter in the grip of a psychotic delusion. When the Indiana Department of Correction released him in 2015, he was terrified something awful might happen again.He had to see a doctor. He had only a month's worth of pills to control his delusions and mania. He was desperate for insurance coverage.But the state failed to enroll him in Medicaid, although under the Affordable Care Act Indiana had expanded the health insurance program to...
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How Just 8 Flavors Have Defined American Cuisine

Sarah Lohman has made everything from colonial-era cocktails to cakes with black pepper to stewed moose face. She is a historical gastronomist, which means she re-creates historical recipes to connect with the past.That moose-face recipe dates back to the 19th century, and it wasn't easy. She recalls spending hours trying to butcher the moose from Alaska in her kitchen in Queens, New York. She tried scalding the face in hot water to remove the fur, but it didn't quite work and her apartment...
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NPR's Book Concierge: Our Guide To 2016's Great Reads

The Book Concierge is back and bigger than ever! Explore more than 300 standout titles picked by NPR staff and critics.Open the app now! Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
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Vote For Your Favorite Albums Of 2016

What were your favorite 2016 releases? Using the form below, write in and rank the five albums you loved most this year. Your No. 1 favorite album goes in the first space, your second-favorite in the second, and so on. We'll tally the votes and share the results in the All Songs Considered podcast on Tuesday, Dec. 13.There was no shortage of remarkable albums this year, from both newcomers and veteran musicians. But if you're having a hard time remembering some of the standouts, browse NPR...
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Fake Or Real? How To Self-Check The News And Get The Facts

Fake news stories can have real-life consequences. On Sunday, police said a man with a rifle who claimed to be "self-investigating" a baseless online conspiracy theory entered a Washington, D.C., pizzeria and fired the weapon inside the restaurant.So, yes, fake news is a big problem.These stories have gotten a lot of attention, with headlines claiming Pope Francis endorsed Donald Trump in November's election and sites like American News sharing misleading stories or taking quotes out of...
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11 Transgender Americans Share Their Stories In HBO's 'The Trans List'

Eleven Americans describe what it's like to be transgender in Timothy Greenfield-Sanders' new HBO documentary, The Trans List. Though the individuals in the film come from varied backgrounds, there is at least one common thread to their experiences: "We all come out publicly," lawyer Kylar Broadus tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "There is no hidden way to come out as a trans person."Broadus, who is profiled in the documentary, was born female but has been living as a man since the 1990s. "I...
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Philly's New Pay-What-You-Can Restaurant Brings Everyone To The Table

It's 6 p.m. on a Wednesday night and there's a line out the door at EAT Café. Inside, executive chef and restaurant manager Donnell Jones-Craven is busy plating up salads and burgers, but he pauses to sprint out into the dining room. "I appreciate so much that you're all here for dinner tonight!" he calls out to those still waiting in line. "Just bear with us and we'll get you seated as soon as we can."Tucked into a crossroads of several West Philadelphia neighborhoods near Presbyterian...
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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.

It's Folk Season

Now that the Metropolitain Opera radio season has ended, The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through the end of November.