Eleanor Klibanoff in front of the city of Scranton.
Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

Take Note: Keystone Crossroads' New Podcast, "Grapple," Visits Scranton

In this special broadcast of Take Note on WPSU, you’ll hear excerpts from a new show from Keystone Crossroads. It's called “Grapple,” and it gives voice to people living and working in distressed communities across Pennsylvania. You’ll hear conversations that help tell the story of America’s profound economic and social changes. Including how places have changed over time to what distressed communities are grappling with today. In this episode, you’ll hear about Scranton and how its economy...
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Eleanor Klibanoff in front of the city of Scranton.
Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

In this special broadcast of Take Note on WPSU, you’ll hear excerpts from a new show from Keystone Crossroads. It's called “Grapple,” and it gives voice to people living and working in distressed communities across Pennsylvania. You’ll hear conversations that help tell the story of America’s profound economic and social changes. Including how places have changed over time to what distressed communities are grappling with today. 

I Believe In Saying No

Sep 29, 2016

  This essay originally aired on October 29, 2015.

I believe in saying no.

But I am mulishly stubborn. I never back down. When you pair that with my Type A personality and overachieving nature, I am downright terrifying when I put my mind to something.

I was raised to believe that quitting is never an option. Saying no to an opportunity or a challenge was never an option. So what changed?

Amish in front of trucks full of hay.
Carolyn Kaster / AP Photo

With Election Day less than two months away, the Trump campaign is doubling down its efforts in Pennsylvania. The commonwealth is on the short list of states the Republican has to win in order to clinch the election.

Trump’s currently lagging in state polls, though the margin may be shrinking. But his campaign is hoping turning out more people who don’t vote regularly may help him out.

One pro-Trump PAC is taking that idea to the extreme. It’s targeting a voting group that doesn’t even use the internet—the Amish.

So, who are these voters?

WPSU Blues Archive - Sept. 24, 2016

Sep 26, 2016
Robman94 / Creative Commons

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on September 24, 2016 and hosted by Adam McMillan. 

In hour one, hear Junior Walker and The All-Stars, Gil Scott Heron, Paul Birch, Jimmy McGriff, John Doe, Bob Dylan, Sturgill Simpson, The Coasters, Benjamin Booker, Etta James, The Whitefield Brothers, Howlin’ Wolf, Blind Willie McTell, and more.  

In hour two, hear The Gun Club, The Fairfield Four, Elvis Presley, Alan Lomax, Elvis Costello, Jimmy Hughes, John Lee Hooker, Marty Stewart, Carla Thomas with Otis Redding, James Taylor and more.   

kittymargolis.com

An archive recording of the WPSU Jazz Show as broadcast on Friday, September 23, 2016 and hosted by Greg Petersen. 

In the first hour hear tracks from Dexter Gordon, Donna Byrne, The Earl Klugh Trio, Gerry Mulligan, Helen Merrill with Stan Getz, Herbie Mann & Phil Woods, Jerry Gonzalez and more.

In the second hour, hear Kitty Margolis, The Marsalis Family, The Mills Brothers, Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson, The Monty Alexander Trio, The  Ron Affif Trio, Diana Krall and more.

Brooke Gladstone joins us from her studio at WNYC, where On The Media is produced, to help us make sense of the information environment we live in.  She’ll also talk about media bias—it turns out, there are lots of different kinds—and we’ll ponder the often-asked question: Did the media create the Trump candidacy?

If you are familiar with science writer Mary Roach, you know she is never one to shy away from parts of science that verge on the absurd. I read two of her previous books, and was enchanted by Roach's unique combination of endless curiosity and a wry sense of humor. So I rushed to lay my hands on her newest book, “Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” It will not fail to live up to her fans’ expectations. Even those who have never read her before will be hard-pressed to put down a book that I finished in a few short days.

Jill Stein in front of a "Green Party" banner.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein visited Penn State Wednesday to ask for votes and volunteers.

She talked to an audience of about 200 about her support for environmental movements, Black Lives Matter and free public education. Stein rejected the idea that voting for a third party was throwing away a vote.

“I won’t sleep well if Donald Trump gets elected. And I won’t sleep well if Hillary Clinton gets elected,” Stein said. “But we live in a democracy. We have more than two deadly choices. We can stand up for the democracy that we need.”

Peter Buckland recounts his memories of the HUB Lawn Shooting for an oral history recording on September 16, 2016.
Erin Cassidy Hendrick / WPSU

September 17, 1996 is a painful date for many who were attending Penn State, including Peter Buckland. He said, “The community was , I would say, totally floored. I mean, I was.”

It was the day State College resident Jillian Robbins opened fire on the lawn of the HUB student union on the University Park campus, killing one student and wounding another.

Bloodshot Records

  

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on September 17, 2016 and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear The David Bromberg Band, Jackson Browne, The Black Keys. Roy Acuff, Frank Zappa, Rev. Gary Davis, Jack White, Barance Whitfield and The Savages, The Felice Brothers, Ry Cooder, and more.

In hour two, hear Johnny Cash, Beck, Will Weldon, Sleepy John Estes, Doc Watson, Dr. John, Leon Redbone, and more.

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NPR Stories

Saying that Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore violated judicial ethics when he ordered judges not to respect the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, Alabama's Court of the Judiciary suspended Moore for the rest of his term in office.

Men who may have been exposed to the Zika virus should wait at least six months before trying to conceive a child with a partner, regardless of whether they ever had any symptoms, federal health officials are recommending.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had previously recommended that only men with Zika symptoms had to wait that long. Those who may have been exposed to Zika but never developed any symptoms were told to hold off on trying to conceive for just eight weeks.

Zika wasn't even on Dr. Sankar Swaminathan's mind when he first examined a severely ill 73-year-old man in a Salt Lake City hospital in June. The patient had just returned from a visit to Mexico when he suddenly fell violently ill.

"We were not thinking about Zika at all because Zika usually does not cause severe illness, in fact it almost never does," says Swaminathan, chief of the division of infectious diseases at the University of Utah.

When people go to the dentist, they generally expect to leave in better health than when they walked in.

But the water dentists use to rinse teeth sometimes carries infectious bacteria.

The Orange County Health Care Agency in California says that nearly two dozen children who received so-called baby root canals, or pulpotomies, are thought to have developed dangerous bacterial infections. Dentists perform pulpotomies to remove infected pulp inside a baby tooth so the rest of the tooth can be spared.

Are We Headed Into Another Mass Extinction?

2 hours ago

Part 3 of TED Radio Hour episode Anthropocene

About Peter Ward's TED Talk

At various times, life on earth has come close to being erased. Paleontologist Peter Ward explains what we can learn from previous mass extinctions

About Peter Ward

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A Decade After Amish School Shooting, Gunman's Mother Talks Of Forgiveness

Ten years ago, a gunman barricaded himself inside a one-room Amish schoolhouse near Lancaster, Pa. Then he opened fire.Charles "Charlie" Roberts killed five children and injured five others before killing himself.

But the Amish community responded in a way that many found surprising: they forgave the shooter. And, in the years since, they have grown close to his family.
'I will never face my Amish neighbors again'"As I turned on the radio on the way there, the newscaster...
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Decades-Old Housing Discrimination Case Plagues Donald Trump

During the presidential debate on Monday night, Hillary Clinton raised a 1973 federal lawsuit brought against Donald Trump and his company for alleged racial discrimination at Trump housing developments in New York.The Justice Department sued Donald Trump, his father, Fred, and Trump Management in order to obtain a settlement in which Trump and his father would promise not to discriminate. The case eventually was settled two years later after Trump tried to countersue the Justice Department...
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Tech Giants Team Up To Tackle The Ethics Of Artificial Intelligence

Artificial intelligence is one of those tech terms that seems to inevitably conjure up images (and jokes) of computer overlords running sci-fi dystopias — or, more recently, robots taking over human jobs.But AI is already here: It's powering your voice-activated digital personal assistants and Web searches, guiding automated features on your car and translating foreign texts, detecting your friends in photos you post on social media and filtering your spam.But as practical uses of AI have...
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Questions Of Race And Charter Schools Divide Education Reformers

What does it mean to declare that #blacklivesmatter in education?Last month the Movement for Black Lives, representing elements of the Black Lives Matter movement and related groups, issued a detailed policy platform denouncing what it called "corporate-backed," "market driven" "privatization" in school reform, and helped set off a furor over this question.Under the section labeled "community control," M4BL called for an end to state and mayoral takeovers of school systems in favor of local,...
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Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

On Friday, the Rosetta spacecraft will smack into the icy surface of the comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and go silent. Scientists with the historic mission are wondering how they'll feel as the orbiter makes its death-dive toward the comet that has been its traveling companion for more than two years."There's mixed emotions here," says Matt Taylor of the European Space Agency, who is the project scientist for Rosetta. "You know, people have invested their lives and their mentality, I think,...
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A Wide Gulf Persists Between Black And White Perceptions Of Policing

A new study highlights differences between the races as they view the recent spate of deadly encounters between blacks and law enforcement.A survey by the Pew Research Center finds only a third of blacks and nearly three-quarters of whites say police in their communities do an excellent or good job using appropriate force.From Pew's report:"Most whites (75%) say their local police do an excellent or good job when it comes to using the right amount of force for each situation. Only 33% of...
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A Growing Champagne Trend Is Uncorking More Ways To Celebrate

When trying to demystify wine, one of the most misunderstood challenges for consumers can be the fizzy stuff.There are all sorts of foreign names for what's commonly known as sparkling wine: Cava (from Spain), Prosecco (from Italy), Crémant (from many different regions in France), Sekt (from Germany). But all too often if we see tiny bubbles racing to the top of a glass, our first assumption is Champagne.But not all sparkling wines taste alike – or are made alike.The French would sooner have...
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Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'The Magnificent Seven' And 'Fleabag'

[In case you haven't heard, Pop Culture Happy Hour is about to embark on a West Coast tour. San Francisco, Seattle and Los Angeles are sold out — though we recently added an appearance (with Guy Branum!) at the Now Hear This podcast festival in Anaheim on Oct. 29 — but we'll also be in Portland on Oct. 19 with our dear pal Audie Cornish. Tickets for that one are still available. Oh, and we're fielding requests for pop-culture advice, so fill out this form to send us your questions. We might...
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Rats That Reminisce May Lead To Better Tests For Alzheimer's Drugs

What rats can remember may help people who forget.Researchers are reporting evidence that rats possess "episodic memories," the kind of memories that allow us to go back in time and recall specific events. These memories are among the first to disappear in people who develop Alzheimer's disease.The finding, which appears Thursday in Current Biology, suggests that rats could offer a better way to test potential drugs for Alzheimer's. Right now, most of these drugs are tested in mice."We need...
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Our Robot Overlords Are Now Delivering Pizza, And Cooking It On The Go

In Mountain View, Calif., a couple of miles down the road from Google, there's a new pizza shop. Only instead of a dozen blue-collar workers pouring marinara sauce, Zume Pizza has — you guessed it! — robots and algorithms running the show.Their job is to solve a familiar problem: It's game night. You order pizza for you and your buddies. It arrives later than you'd hoped, aaaand it's cold."Pizza is not meant to sit in a cardboard box, ever," Zume co-founder Julia Collins says. "The best pizza...
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A Legend Of Creepy Hollows: 'Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children'

When did our expectations for Tim Burton movies sink so precipitously? We ought to be able to forgive the guy who made Ed Wood and Sleepy Hollow a Planet of the Apes now and then. Or even an Alice in Wonderland, so long as he keeps balancing mega-grossing mediocrities like that with heartfelt stuff like Frankenweenie, his delightful stop-motion ode to his dog. Any director who averages a studio feature every other year for three decades will have a stinker or two on his resume.And yet somehow...
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FDA Approves The First Automated Insulin System For Type 1 Diabetes

The Food and Drug Administration's approval of a new insulin delivery system for people with Type 1 diabetes is a big deal.With Type 1 diabetes, the pancreas makes little or no insulin so people have to replace it with either multiple daily injections or a pump. In either case, that process involves constant error-prone adjustments, particularly around food and exercise. Over the long term, high blood sugar levels can lead to organ damage, but over-correcting by giving more insulin can cause...
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NPR Special Coverage: The Vice Presidential Debate

WPSU will bring you NPR's live, special coverage and analysis of the Vice Presidential Debate, Tuesday, October 4 at 9:00pm on WPSU-FM.

Deadline to register to vote for the general election is October 11. Find out how to register, learn about offices up for election, and find other valuable voter resources by visiting wpsu.org/vote16.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

Reasons To Stay

WPSU's series "Reasons to Stay" explores what keeps people in central Pa. On the radio during Morning Edition, and on our multi-media website.

Add your voice!

Write an essay for WPSU's This I Believe or BookMark.

On-Air Schedule

It's Folk Season

Now that the Metropolitain Opera radio season has ended, The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through the end of November.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Turn Your Old Clunker into Public Radio

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it, and turn it into great public radio programs on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.