4 Questions With NPR's Nina Totenberg About Justice Antonin Scalia

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly on Saturday. We spoke to NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg about his life, legacy and what's next.1. Let's talk about Scalia's legal perspective. He was known as a proponent of originalism. Can you tell us a bit about that?Originalism, as defined by Justice Scalia and others, is that what is in the Constitution literally is what the founding fathers meant.If you're talking about whether the death penalty in certain circumst...
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WPSU Jazz Archive - Feb. 12, 2016

16 hours ago
Chris Hakkens / Creative Commons

With the upcoming Grammy Awards on Monday, this edition of WPSU Jazz features Grammy Nominated Jazz in the first hour of the program. We'll hear music from the Christian McBride Trio, Joshua Redman & The Bad Plus, Joey Alexander, and John Scofield, all of whom were nominated for Best Improvised Jazz Solo. 

Since the United Nations Volunteers program began in 1971, more than 50,000 volunteers have been mobilized around the world. Volunteers help organize and run local and national elections and support a large number of peacekeeping and humanitarian projects.  What does it take to become a volunteer—and are volunteers making a real difference?  WPSU's Patty Satalia talks about that and more with Jennifer Stapper, Communications Chief for the United Nations Volunteers program.

BookMark: "The Reformation" by Katherine Bode-Lang

Feb 11, 2016

“To everything there is a season,” Ecclesiastes tells us. Katherine Bode-Lang, local poet and national winner of the Honickman First Book Prize, understands this deeply. In her award-winning collection, The Reformation, she gets her hands dirty with what matters: resistance and acceptance, regret and impenitence. “All day, my hands smell of remembrance,” she tells us. With fierce, lyrical poems, she digs up questions and plants experiences. She weathers through our physical and spiritual seasons. At year’s end, she arrives at love.

Gov. Tom Wolf
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

  

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf says the state will continue its plans to cut carbon emissions. That's despite a surprise move by the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday that put a hold on Obama's initiative to force states to cut greenhouse gas emissions. 

Pennsylvania has been on target to comply with the federal Clean Power Plan, and its target of reducing emissions 32 percent by 2030.

In the meantime, 27 other states opposed to the plan have challenged it in court. The Supreme Court has halted any further implementation of the plan until the court battle is over.

Pa. Senate Votes Against Removing AG Kane

Feb 10, 2016
Kathleen Kane
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Pennsylvania Attorney General Kathleen Kane gets to keep her job -- for now. 

  A vote to remove her from office failed in the state senate.  

While a majority of Pennsylvania senators -- mostly Republicans -- were in favor of removing Kane from office, they fell short of the required two-thirds majority needed to invoke a section of the state constitution that hasn't been used since 1891.

2 Pennsylvania Women Test Positive For Zika Virus

Feb 10, 2016
mosquito
Felipe Dana, File / AP Photo

State health authorities say two female Pennsylvania residents have tested positive for the Zika virus.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health says the two had recently traveled to countries affected by the ongoing outbreak of the mosquito-borne virus.

Secretary of Health Dr. Karen Murphy said officials are concerned about the health of those individuals and others who may be exposed, but the want to emphasize that the two cases "pose no threat to the public."

Gov. Tom Wolf giving budget address to full room.
Chris Knight / AP Photo

Democratic Governor Tom Wolf offered up some tough talk for the GOP-controlled state Legislature in his second budget address, scarcely mentioning the details of his proposed $33.3 billion plan.

“Usually this speech is an opportunity to lay out an ambitious agenda for the year ahead,” Wolf said. “But I can’t give that speech. Not under these circumstances.”

Wolf’s proposal calls for $2.7 billion in new and higher taxes to close a budget gap and funnel more money into education, human services, and mandated spending.

Gov. Tom Wolf Unveils 2016-17 Budget Proposal

Feb 9, 2016
Gov. Tom Wolf, with Rep. Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny and Lt. Gov. Mike Stack behind him.
Chris Knight / AP Photo

Gov. Tom Wolf warned lawmakers on Tuesday that Pennsylvania's finances are a ticking time bomb amid a record-long budget gridlock, sending them a spending proposal for the coming fiscal year with no full plan in place for the fiscal year that began back in July.

Lock Haven Students Rally For State Funding

Feb 8, 2016
Pennsylvania State Capitol Building
Carolyn Kaster / AP

Students and faculty from state-owned universities across the state traveled to Harrisburg to advocate for increased funding for the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education.

Lock Haven University students and faculty wearing the school’s colors boarded a bus to the state capitol on Monday. The state system’s faculty union sponsored a bus for each state-owned university to send students, faculty and alumni to advocate for more state funding for higher education.

minds-eye

  

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as aired on February 6, 2016 and hosted by Max Spiegel with special guest host Sister Sylvie of sister station WKPS-FM. 

 In the first hour, hear tracks from Guy Davis, The Black Keys, Maria Muldaur, Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Sunhouse, Etta James, Swamp Cabbage, Ry Cooder, Paul Kantner and Marty Balin, Jefferson Airplane, and more.  

In the second hour, hear Champion Jack Dupree, Doc Watson, Bob Weir, Robert Johnson, Jimi Hendrix Experience, Steve Miller Band, The Shack Shakers, The White Stripes, and more.   

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NPR Stories

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly on Saturday. We spoke to NPR's Legal Affairs Correspondent Nina Totenberg about his life, legacy and what's next.

1. Let's talk about Scalia's legal perspective. He was known as a proponent of originalism. Can you tell us a bit about that?

Originalism, as defined by Justice Scalia and others, is that what is in the Constitution literally is what the founding fathers meant.

With two contests down and the South Carolina primary only a week away, the six remaining Republican candidates took the debate stage Saturday night.

The debate, hosted by CBS News, featured lots of sparring between Donald Trump, Jeb Bush and Ted Cruz. Who spoke the longest? As always, NPR had its stopwatch at the ready.

President Obama struck a somber tone, remembering the late-Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia as a "towering legal mind" who influenced a generation, but made it clear, he intends to replace him.

"I plan to fulfill my constitutional obligation to appoint a successor — in due time," Obama said, adding that he expected a fair hearing and a timely vote.

Lawmakers, presidential candidates on both sides and other prominent Americans have been reacting to the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia. Scalia, 79, was found dead Saturday at a luxury ranch in West Texas.

Both conservatives and liberals have been describing him as brilliant, patriotic and a defender of the Constitution. And while several commenters have said they disagreed with Scalia's views, they all professed sound respect for him. We've rounded up some of the tributes.

Justice Antonin Scalia loved a good fight.

So it's only fitting that news of his death at age 79 ignited an immediate and partisan battle over who might take his place on the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Obama Remembers Scalia As 'Consequential,' Vows To Appoint Replacement

President Obama struck a somber tone, remembering the late-Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia as a "towering legal mind" who influenced a generation, but made it clear, he intends to replace him."I plan to fulfill my constitutional obligation to appoint a successor — in due time," Obama said, adding that he expected a fair hearing and a timely vote.Obama, who spoke for just a few minutes, praised Scalia and said it was a day to remember Scalia's "remarkable" life. But make no mistake, Obama...
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Get Ready For A Fight To Replace Scalia

Justice Antonin Scalia loved a good fight.So it's only fitting that news of his death at age 79 ignited an immediate and partisan battle over who might take his place on the U.S. Supreme Court.Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Kent., said the vacancy should not be filled until the new president takes office. And Charles Grassley, the Iowa Republican who leads the Judiciary Committee, which would oversee any nomination, said it's "standard practice over the the last 80 years" for lawma...
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Justice Antonin Scalia, Known For Biting Dissents, Dies At 79

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, perhaps the leading voice of uncompromising conservatism on the nation's highest court, was found dead Saturday, Chief Justice John Roberts has confirmed. Scalia, who had been staying at a luxury ranch in West Texas, was 79 years old."On behalf of the Court and retired Justices, I am saddened to report that our colleague Justice Antonin Scalia has passed away," Roberts said in a statement. "He was an extraordinary individual and jurist, admired and treasu...
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#NPRreads: 4 Eye-Opening Stories To Read This Weekend

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers from our newsroom share the pieces that have kept them reading, using the #NPRreads hashtag. Each weekend, we highlight some of the best stories.From NPR Ed Digital Producer and Editor Elissa Nadworny:I love when profiles introduce you to people behind the work you love. In last Sunday's New York Times magazine, Vinson Cunningham wrote about Chris Jackson — the editor behi...
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Einstein Saw Space Move, Long Before We Could Hear It

Here we are in an election year — once again asking the great see-into-the-future question in politics — who will be the next president?Yesterday, I picked up the paper (I still have a paper to pick up) and read about a man who did see into the future, Albert Einstein. He developed his theory of general relativity in the early 20th century, and in 1915, he announced his theory that space and time are woven together and that events in the universe can cause space and time to move, to bob and j...
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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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