John Glenn, First American To Orbit The Earth, Dies At 95

Updated 5 p.m. ETThe first American to orbit the Earth has died. John Glenn was the last surviving member of the original Mercury astronauts. He would later have a long political career as a U.S. senator, but that didn't stop his pioneering ways.Glenn made history a second time in 1998, when he flew aboard the shuttle Discovery to become the oldest person to fly in space.Glenn was 95 when he died; he had been hospitalized in an Ohio State University medical center in Columbus since last week...
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Courtesy of Stockton Williams, ULI

 

The traditional narrative goes like this: After World War II, upper and middle class white families fled the inner cities for the suburbs. They were chasing the "American Dream" of white picket fences, two car garages and shopping centers you could drive to. The children of those Baby Boomers grew up, fought back and now, are moving back to the cities.

According to a new report from the Urban Land Institute's Terwilliger Center for Housing, the first part of that story is more true than the second part — so far.

Ryan Loew / For Keystone Crossroads

 

Moving goods on barges is big business, but the lock system those barges rely on teeters on the brink of failure.

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An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on December 3, 2016, and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear John Sebastian, Keb' Mo’, Rev. Gary Davis, Jimi Hendrix, Mississippi John Hurt, The Black Keys, The Beatles, Etta James, Bob Dylan, Rory Gallagher, and more.

In hour two, hear Muddy Waters, Tommy Johnson, Arthur Gunter, Leo Kottke, Gil Scott Heron, Tedeschi-Trucks, Led Zepplin, Tad Benoit, Ry Cooder, and more. 

Ray Holley is your host for this episode of the Folk Show.  You’ll hear a wide range of styles and performances on this audio archive of a live radio broadcast.  The two-hour show is divided into two segments, in order to preserve the audio quality.     

Steve Van Hook is your host for this episode of the Folk Show.  You’ll hear a wide range of styles and performances on this audio archive of a live radio broadcast.  The two-hour show is divided into two segments, in order to preserve the audio quality.      

Laurel Zydney is your host for this episode of the Folk Show.  You’ll hear a wide range of styles and performances on this audio archive of a live radio broadcast.  The two-hour show is divided into two segments, in order to preserve the audio quality.   

WPSU Jazz Archive - Dec. 2, 2016

Dec 3, 2016
JBreeschoten / Creative Commons

  

An archive edition of the WPSU Jazz show as hosted by Greg Halpin and broadcast on December 2, 2016. 

The first hour of the program has all new jazz releases from Carl Winther, the Rudy Royston Trio, the Nigel Price Organ Trio, Anthony Branker & Imagine, Lee Konitz & Kenny Wheeler Quartet, Keith Jarrett, Scott Bradlee's Postmodern Jukebox, Macy Gray, and Cameron Mizell. 

Polls show that the overwhelming majority of Americans recognize the urgency of acting on human-induced climate change. Why then haven't we done more as a nation to address the problem?  Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann says politicians are doing the bidding of powerful fossil fuel interests while ignoring the long-term good of the people they’re supposed to represent.

Jose Luis Magana / AP Photo

 

Time is running out for Pennsylvania coal miners. By January 1, 13,000 coal miners could lose their pensions and thousands their health care. Legislation called the Miners Protection Act would avert the loss of benefits, but the U.S. Senate has yet to schedule the bill for a vote.

From T.S. Eliot to Gerard Manley Hopkins, Emily Dickinson to Flannery O’Connor, faith and poetry have long been companions. Each is a guide, in its own way, to grace. In True, False, None of the Above, poet Marjorie Maddox tracks her own relationship with faith and doubt, and the repeated ways in which literature, faith, and students challenge and resurrect her beliefs.

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Thirty years ago, a new face debuted on daytime television: Oprah Winfrey.

The new podcast, "Making Oprah," produced by member station WBEZ, chronicles Oprah's rise to stardom. Journalist Jenn White tells Oprah's story from her early days on her first talk show, AM Chicago, through to the biggest, most outrageous moments when 40 million people a week were watching her national show.

With Donald Trump's choices for secretaries of transportation and of Housing and Urban Development — Elaine Chao and Dr. Ben Carson, respectively — there may be hints about the urban agenda Trump's administration may be shaping.

Even non-Christians must allow that the New Testament is a formidable document. So any attempt to write what Jaco Van Dormael's comedy calls Le tout noveau testament (The Brand New Testament) requires careful deliberation. But the Belgian writer-director and his co-scripter, Thomas Gunzig, just didn't think very hard about their undertaking. The result is a satire whose whimsies and sight gags frequently click, but whose philosophical impact is negligible.

Slash fiction, for the unbent, is generally defined as fan fiction that pairs two characters or real people of the same sex in an intimate or erotic way: you've got your Kirk/Spock, your Sherlock/Watson, your Axl/Slash (sorry). The culture has been around for decades and is the subject of much queer-studies scholarship, but until the Internet such activity remained largely cloaked in shadow.

It's been nearly a year since Mayor Karen Weaver declared a state of emergency in Flint, Mich.

Before she became mayor, the city switched its water supply to the Flint River in a cost-cutting measure. The water wasn't properly treated, which caused corrosion in old pipes — leaching lead and other toxins into the city's tap water. People were afraid to drink or even bathe in the water.

Since then, a lot has happened.

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Russia Seen Moving New Missiles To Eastern Europe

In what could mark an escalation of tensions with the West, commercial satellite images suggest that Russia is moving a new generation of nuclear-capable missiles into Eastern Europe.Russia appears to be preparing to permanently base its Iskander missile system in Kaliningrad, a sliver of territory it controls along the Baltic coast between Lithuania and Poland. Arms control experts shared fresh satellite imagery with NPR, which they say provides evidence that the Iskander will soon be housed...
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A Mummy's DNA May Help Solve The Mystery Of The Origins Of Smallpox

The surprise find of smallpox DNA in a child mummy from the 17th century could help scientists start to trace the mysterious history of this notorious virus.Smallpox currently only exists in secure freezers, after a global vaccination campaign eradicated the virus in the late 1970s. But much about this killer remains unknown, including its origins.Now scientists have the oldest complete set of smallpox genes, after they went hunting for viral DNA in a sample of skin from a mummified young...
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John Glenn, First American To Orbit The Earth, Dies At 95

Updated 5 p.m. ETThe first American to orbit the Earth has died. John Glenn was the last surviving member of the original Mercury astronauts. He would later have a long political career as a U.S. senator, but that didn't stop his pioneering ways.Glenn made history a second time in 1998, when he flew aboard the shuttle Discovery to become the oldest person to fly in space.Glenn was 95 when he died; he had been hospitalized in an Ohio State University medical center in Columbus since last week...
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Remembering Greg Lake, The 'Lucky Man'

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nyt57LxWy8 Greg Lake passed away Wednesday at the age of 69 after a battle with cancer. In his heyday, he had a monumental voice. It sat staunch atop the frenetic keyboards of Emerson, Lake & Palmer's Keith Emerson (who took his own life earlier this year) and managed a delicate balance in the surreal, uncharted territory of those first two King Crimson records back in 1969 and 1970.Those albums grew out of the imaginings of his mate from Dorset, England,...
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History-Making Somali-American Legislator Reports 'Hateful' Taunts In D.C.

For the first Somali-American lawmaker in the U.S., it was meant to be a day to remember: a visit to the White House for policy meetings before she takes office in Minnesota. But as she left the seat of U.S. power, Ilhan Omar says, she was subjected to a hateful and threatening verbal attack in a cab."I pray for his humanity and for all those who harbor hate in their hearts," Omar, a Muslim who wears a head scarf, wrote of the cab driver who she says assailed her. In a Facebook post, she says...
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2 Juveniles Charged With Arson, Suspected Of Starting Deadly Tennessee Wildfire

Two juveniles have been arrested and charged with arson for allegedly starting the fire that killed at least 14 people in east Tennessee last month. They might be tried as adults, and authorities say there might be more arrests.Prosecutors say the two minors started a fire on Nov. 23, according to a statement from the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation.Feeding off a drought-stricken forest, the Chimney Tops 2 fire grew inside the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. On Nov. 28, it swept into...
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Off Broadway Parody Takes A Shot At 'Hamilton'

Theatre lovers who can’t get a ticket to the Broadway hit Hamilton have another option. An off-Broadway parody called Spamilton is running at the Triad Theatre through March.The show is the brainchild of playwright and satirist Gerard Alessandrini (@ForbiddenGerard), who created the award-winning Forbidden Broadway parody show, which ran uninterrupted in New York for 25 years.Spamilton takes shots both at Hamilton and its writer, creator and lyricist, Lin Manuel Miranda.Spamilton is a...
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Magnitude 6.5 Earthquake Shakes California

A magnitude 6.5 earthquake struck about 100 miles off the Northern California coast on Thursday morning, according to the U.S. Geological Survey.The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center said the earthquake, originally reported to have a magnitude of 6.8, wasn't powerful enough to generate a destructive tsunami. No damage or injuries were reported.The epicenter was relatively close to the surface — about 7.5 miles down — and its effects were felt especially by residents in the town of Ferndale,...
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Life Expectancy In U.S. Drops For First Time In Decades, Report Finds

One of the fundamental ways scientists measure the well-being of a nation is tracking the rate at which its citizens die and how long they can be expected to live.So the news out of the federal government Thursday is disturbing: The overall U.S. death rate has increased for the first time in a decade, according to an analysis of the latest data. And that led to a drop in overall life expectancy for the first time since 1993, particularly among people younger than 65."This is a big deal," says...
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Not For You, Cindy Lou! These Tasty Holiday Treats Are For Grownups

The sweet aroma of cookies baking wafts through the kitchen as the kids trample in and plead, "When are they gonna be ready?" Smile and reply softly, "Soon. But these are for the company, dear hearts."And these cookies will still be there when your guests arrive, because the kids will taste them and move onto the chocolate chips and frosted Santas.With twinges of flavors like anise, cardamom, basil, liqueur and coffee, these treats definitely appeal to grown-up taste buds.All Things...
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Baby Dinosaur's 99 Million-Year-Old Tail, Encased In Amber, Surfaces In Myanmar

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dnRxQ3dcaQk In 2015, Lida Xing was visiting a market in northern Myanmar when a salesman brought out a piece of amber about the size of a pink rubber eraser. Inside, he could see a couple of ancient ants and a fuzzy brown tuft that the salesman said was a plant.As soon as Xing saw it, he knew it wasn't a plant. It was the delicate, feathered tail of a tiny dinosaur."I have studied paleontology for more than 10 years and have been interested in dinosaurs for more...
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The 10 Best Books Of 2016 Faced Tough Topics Head On

I hesitate to say it, but the one word that characterizes my best books of 2016 list is "serious." These books aren't grim and they're certainly not dull, but collectively they're serious about tackling big, sometimes difficult subjects — and they're also distinguished by seriously good writing. Here are 10 that you shouldn't miss. Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.DAVE DAVIES, BYLINE: This is FRESH AIR. Our book critic Maureen Corrigan has her list of the 10-best books...
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Trump's Pick For Education: A Free Market Approach To School Choice

The unofficial motto of a public charter school co-founded by Betsy DeVos — President-elect Trump's choice to lead the Department of Education — could be "No Pilot Left Behind."Nearby a small maintenance hangar that's part of the West Michigan Aviation Academy, one of the school's two Cessna 172 airplanes chugs down the tarmac of Gerald R. Ford International Airport. The school is based on the airport's grounds, just outside Grand Rapids.Besty DeVos and her husband, Dick DeVos, led the effort...
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Are You Of Two Minds? Michael Lewis' New Book Explores How We Make Decisions

We like to think our brains can make rational decisions — but maybe they can't.The way risks are presented can change the way we respond, says best-selling author Michael Lewis. In his new book, The Undoing Project, Lewis tells the story of Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky, two Israeli psychologists who made some surprising discoveries about the way people make decisions. Along the way, they also founded an entire branch of psychology called behavioral economics.Lewis is also the author of...
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Reporter's Notebook: What It Was Like As A Muslim To Cover The Election

Editor's note: There is language in this piece that some will find offensive.Sometime in early 2016 between a Trump rally in New Hampshire, where a burly man shouted something at me about being Muslim, and a series of particularly vitriolic tweets that included some combination of "raghead," "terrorist," "bitch" and "jihadi," I went into my editor's office and wept.I cried for the first (but not the last) time this campaign season.Through tears, I told her that if I had known my sheer...
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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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NPR's Book Concierge: Our Guide To 2016's Great Reads

The Book Concierge is back and bigger than ever! Explore more than 300 standout titles picked by NPR staff and critics.Open the app now! Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.
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It's Folk Season

Now that the Metropolitain Opera radio season has ended, The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through the end of November.