Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

Updated at 3:55 p.m. ET

A global megacorporation best known for Band-Aids and baby powder is now on the hook for about $107 million less than originally anticipated over its role in Oklahoma's opioid crisis.

In a judgment filed Friday, state District Judge Thad Balkman revised an earlier ruling against Johnson & Johnson and told the drugmaker to make a onetime payment of $465 million — not the $572 million he had originally ordered.

In some ways, the fact that Behrouz Boochani touched down in New Zealand on his way to a literary festival is unremarkable. His memoir, No Friend but the Mountains, won Australia's richest literary prize earlier this year, after all, and presenting at such festivals is a pretty standard item on any celebrated writer's itinerary.

But this trip represented something unfamiliar for the Kurdish-Iranian journalist: his first glimpse of freedom in six years.

Take a quick scan of the 16 nominees for next year's Aspen Words Literary Prize, and you're likely to find that their dust jackets boast the stuff of international headlines. And that's the point: The annual award, which revealed its longlist Thursday, is intended to honor fiction that doesn't shy from the weightiest, thorniest of social issues today.

(You can jump to the full list by heading to Aspen's website or clicking here.)

Evo Morales may be out of the country, but he's not out of the picture.

Updated at 1:37 p.m. ET

Rocket fire rained from the sky across the border between Israel and the Gaza Strip, leaving at least seven people dead in Gaza and dozens more injured on either side Tuesday. Among the dead was Bahaa Abu el-Atta, commander of a militant group in Gaza known as Palestinian Islamic Jihad, according to the Israel Defense Forces.

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva is a free man once more.

On Friday, a judge ordered the release of Brazil's popular former president, who is better known simply as "Lula." The order was handed down just one day after the country's Supreme Court ruled that convicted defendants cannot be jailed until their appeals to higher courts have been exhausted.

Updated at 4:15 p.m. ET

Roughly five months since massive protests first spread through Hong Kong, unrest has flared anew after a student died of injuries sustained during a protest. Chow Tsz-lok, a 22-year-old student at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, died Friday of brain injuries he suffered in a fall as police dispersed protesters from a parking garage earlier this week.

Chow is believed to be the first person to die in violence directly related to the protests.

Editor's note: This story contains details of violence that some readers may find upsetting.

A notorious warlord whose activities in the Democratic Republic of Congo earned him the moniker "the Terminator" has been sentenced to 30 years in prison for war crimes and crimes against humanity. The International Criminal Court handed down the penalty for Bosco Ntaganda during a hearing Thursday at The Hague, Netherlands.

Updated at 1:50 p.m. ET

In a blow to the Trump administration, a federal court in Manhattan has knocked down a rule that would make it easier for doctors and other health care workers to refuse care for religious reasons.

Israel's Supreme Court has upheld the government's decision to deport the regional director of Human Rights Watch. The high court's ruling Tuesday means that Omar Shakir, a U.S. citizen who oversees Israeli and Palestinian policy for the international rights monitor, can be removed under a 2017 law that bans foreigners who publicly call for boycotts of Israel or its West Bank settlements.

Shakir had been accused of supporting the boycott, divestment and sanctions movement against Israel. He now has 20 days to leave the country if the government proceeds with deportation efforts.

E. Jean Carroll, the advice columnist who says President Trump sexually assaulted her more than two decades ago in a New York City department store, is suing the president for defamation.

For weeks, anti-government demonstrations have filled the streets of Baghdad and other Iraqi cities, with protesters calling for the ouster of Prime Minister Adel Abdul-Mahdi. Now, it appears they are about to get their wish: Iraqi President Barham Salih announced Thursday that the premier has agreed to step down and called for early elections.

In a surprise move, the NCAA says it intends to allow college athletes to earn compensation — but it says it's only starting to work out the details of how that would take place. The organization's board of governors said Tuesday that it had voted unanimously to permit student-athletes to benefit from the use of their name, image and likeness.

Updated at 1:50 a.m. ET on Wednesday

Firefighters knew their respite would not last in Northern California.

Updated at 11:50 p.m. ET

Firefighters in Northern California on Monday tried to take advantage of a break in the historically high winds whipping the region to battle the Kincade Fire in Sonoma County wine country before the another round of winds arrives in force on Tuesday.

Updated at 4:08 p.m. ET

The divorce has been deferred once more.

Days before the U.K.'s Oct. 31 deadline to leave the European Union, the multinational bloc agreed to Britain's request on Monday to postpone the departure another three months.

Updated at 6:08 p.m. ET

Some 40 days after United Automobile Workers walked off the job, picketing General Motors plants and grinding operations to a halt, the labor union's members have ratified the tentative deal their representatives struck with the automaker earlier this month. The UAW announced the deal's approval after voting ended Friday.

Employees will return to work as instructed by GM.

The contract was approved by 57.2%.

Maria Butina's prison term has ended.

The Russian national, who pleaded guilty late last year to conspiring to act as a clandestine foreign agent, was released Friday into the custody of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

Now she's expected to be deported quickly back to Russia.

Updated at 10:48 a.m. ET

Facebook unveiled a new way of delivering news to users Friday, in the latest change to its approach to journalism. The company says Facebook News will connect users to stories that are personalized for their interests and also highlight "the most relevant national stories of the day."

Facebook News is being tested with a subset of mobile app users starting Friday, the company says. And Facebook has hired a small team of journalists who will pick the stories that show up in one of the sections of the app, called Today's Stories.

Nestled deeply in the Australian Outback, some 280 miles from the nearest town, a red sandstone behemoth rises higher even than the Eiffel Tower — and has stood at the center of a decadeslong disagreement between tourists and its traditional owners. That dispute may finally reach its resolution Saturday, when the imposing monolith known as Uluru will be closed permanently to climbers.

Less than two weeks after Abiy Ahmed won the Nobel Peace Prize and earned plaudits across the world, the Ethiopian prime minister has found himself embroiled in an escalating standoff with a prominent activist back at home.

After nearly a month of fraught negotiations, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has abandoned his attempt to form a new government. On Monday, the longtime leader, who heads the conservative Likud party, acknowledged his failure to cobble together a coalition from last month's muddled election results, and he returned the mandate to President Reuven Rivlin.

Updated at 3:30 p.m. ET on Oct. 24

Make no mistake: The legal fight over liability for the U.S. opioid crisis is only heating up.

Updated at 8:19 a.m. ET

In an unusual move, the Swedish Academy doled out Nobel Prizes in literature to two authors on Thursday: Polish writer Olga Tokarczuk, who won the postponed 2018 award, and Austrian author Peter Handke, who won the prize for this year. The academy's permanent secretary, Mats Malm, announced the winners at a press briefing in Stockholm.

Updated at 4:48 p.m. ET

Editor's note: This story contains explicit accusations that some readers may find upsetting.

A former junior colleague of Matt Lauer's has accused him of raping her in his hotel room during the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia. In her first public comments about the incident — told to journalist Ronan Farrow for his forthcoming book, Catch and Kill — Brooke Nevils said the former Today show host forced anal sex on her without her consent in his hotel room.

Less than a week after Ecuador scrapped its nationwide fuel subsidies, prompting a massive spike in prices and popular anger, violent protests have helped drive President Lenín Moreno and his government from the country's capital. In a nationwide address Monday, Moreno announced that he and his ministers are presiding from the coastal city of Guayaquil after Quito's dangerous descent into "looting, vandalism and violence."

Just 25 books can still be called contenders for the 2019 National Book Awards.

The National Book Foundation on Tuesday unveiled the finalists, listing five books each in five categories. And while there are some readily recognizable names among the remaining authors — some with past shortlist appearances and other literary prizes already under their belt — none of them has taken home a National Book Award in these categories before.

In London and Amsterdam, in Sydney and New York, and in other major cities dotting the map in between, demonstrators crammed main arteries and were arrested by the hundreds Monday as they railed against government inaction on climate change.

The Justice Department is asking that Facebook hold off on its plans to fully encrypt its messaging services. In an open letter to the company's CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, federal law enforcement officials and their counterparts in the U.K. and Australia said the end-to-end encryption proposal would block their access to users' communications and interfere with their "ability to stop criminals and abusers in their tracks."

Well, that didn't last long.

About 24 hours after opposition lawmakers elevated Peruvian Vice President Mercedes Aráoz to the country's highest office — a move targeted squarely at the president with whom they are feuding — Aráoz has decided to bow out. On Tuesday night, the would-be interim president shuffled off the title, saying in a statement posted to Twitter that she was declining the job because "the constitutional order in Peru has broken down."

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