Emily Reddy

News Director

Emily Reddy is the news director at WPSU-FM, the NPR-affiliate public radio station for central and northern Pennsylvania.

In addition to leading the news staff, Reddy creates news stories that air during Morning Edition and All Things Considered and serves as the lead producer of WPSU’s radio series This I Believe, BookMark, and Story Corps. She sometimes fills in as an on-air host.

Reddy’s work has been recognized with a regional Edward R. Murrow Award and multiple awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association, Inc. and the Pennsylvania Associated Press Media Editors.

She also teaches a news writing and reporting class at Penn State.

Reddy originally got hooked on radio as a volunteer reporter and news anchor for WMNF, a community radio station in her hometown of Tampa, Florida. She then went to grad school to pursue this passion professionally.

While at Boston University, Reddy produced segments for the daily news magazine show Here & Now. She also served as a general reporter in Washington D.C. for WAMU and as capitol correspondent for WNPR.

She earned a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Boston University and a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida.

She lives in a 140-year-old former one-room schoolhouse with her husband Jonathan.

Ways to Connect

Bonnie Kline Smeltzer
Emily Reddy / WPSU

The Smeltzer family lives in a tree-lined subdivision in Boalsburg, just outside of State College. Their living room has a huge picture window with a view of a little park and beyond that the Tussey Mountain ski slope.

We’ve been hearing a lot about the Common Core recently. Oklahoma and South Carolina withdrew from the national education standards last week. Indiana pulled out in March. State College education expert and former Department of Education consultant Henry Brzycki tells us why he thinks the Common Core and other high stakes testing is not the best answer for educating our kids.

The Fault in Our Stars and Emily Reddy
Kelly Tunney / WPSU

I just finished reading the young adult novel The Fault in Our Stars. This puts me only a couple of years behind hundreds of thousands of teenaged girls and boys. Since the book was released in 2012, it has spent 132 weeks on the New York Times Young Adult bestseller list. 132 weeks! It’s so popular, it’s pulled 3 of John Green’s older novels onto the list along with it. Tomorrow it will be released in movie form. If you go, look for familiar sights. The movie was filmed in Pittsburgh.

High School referendum Yes sign
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Here are elections results for races of interest in the WPSU listening area according to unofficial results…

The State College High School Funding referendum has passed. Voters in the State College school district voted by nearly a 3 to 1 margin to fund $85 million worth of renovations and new building to the local high school.

Democrat Tom Wolf has won the Democratic primary for Governor.

Michael Stack came out on top in a crowded race for Democratic Lt. Governor.

Ooze from floor
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Tuesday’s election will have more than just primary candidates on the ballot. Voters in the State College school district will decide whether to approve an 85 million dollar referendum to pay for renovations and additions to State College Area High School. Only one school district in Pennsylvania has managed to pass a referendum like this one since Act 1 passed in 2006, capping yearly school tax increases.

A group of teachers at the high school, including English teachers Allison Becker and Jennifer Rand, are pushing for a “yes” vote.

Erickson
Penn State

Penn Staters For Responsible Stewardship (PS4RS) endorsed candidates Alice Pope, Al Lord, and Bob Jubelirer in this year’s election. The three beat out 28 other candidates for the open seats on the Penn State Board of Trustees. More than 29-thousand Penn State alumni voted in the election.

The meeting also included accolades for outgoing president Rodney Erickson. Trustees voted to name the Penn State University Park food sciences building and an undergraduate research grant after Erickson.  They also awarded him the Penn State Medal, which was presented by chairman Keith Masser.

Today we talk with two of the four Democratic candidates for Pennsylvania governor. Tom Wolf is a York businessman and the current front runner in the race. He's put $10 million of his own money into his campaign so far and he's flooded the television airwaves with ads. Katie McGinty is a former environmental advisor to President Clinton and former secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection under Ed Rendell.

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Penns Valley Conservation Association president Jim Zubler and the new executive director, Andrea Ferich, talk to Tom Doman, one of the early leaders of PVCA, about its importance to the Penns Valley community.  

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WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Robin Bastress talks with Penns Valley Elementary School teacher and cross-country and basketball coach Terry Glunt about coaching and teaching in Penns Valley for 25 years.  

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Sandra Yohe talks with her mother Marie Breon about her life, and how she met her husband.  

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Jim Zubler and Andrea Ferich talk to Nicholas Brink about his time in central Pennsylvania starting with when he moved here in 1970 to take a job at Penn State. Brink had already been active in the civil rights movement while he was working on a PhD at UCLA.  

StoryCorps
Emily Reddy / WPSU

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Robert Brown interviewed his son Jimmy, who loves history and has won a number of awards for his history presentations.

StoryCorps pair
Emily Reddy

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Curt Bierly and his son Stan talk about the family business, Stanley C. Bierly, in Millheim.

StoryCorps pair
Emily Reddy

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Longtime friends Pauline Zerby and Jerelene Reish talk about growing up in Millheim.

Universities are testing the boundaries of online education with MOOCs, or Massively Open Online Courses. The courses are free and open to anyone and everyone who wants to take part. WPSU’s Emily Reddy takes a look at a Penn State MOOC that’s just wrapping up, about a year after the university first decided to try out this new educational format.

Looking for an older WPSU's Story Corps interview? Find them among our story archives.

John Gaudlip in front of field with sprinklers.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

    

This week WPSU is taking a look at water issues in central Pennsylvania. Today, WPSU’s Emily Reddy explores the massive task of supplying and cleaning the water used by students, faculty, staff and visitors at Penn State University. 

Curator of the Pasto Agricultural Museum, Rita Graef, shows off some of the museum's antique farm equipment.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

The conversations you've been hearing from Story Corps Ag Progress Days were recorded at a unique museum. The Pasto Agricultural Museum's "collection" is made up of farming implements from a time when horse power referred to how many animals you hooked up to a piece of equipment. WPSU's Emily Reddy visited the Pasto during the recent Ag Progress Days events to give us a taste of the farming and household innovations of yesteryear housed at the museum.  

According to the CDC, contaminated foods cause 3,000 deaths a year in the US. In response to large-scale and highly-publicized contaminations in recent years to foods like spinach and peanut butter, the government has created the Food Safety Modernization Act. But WPSU's Emily Reddy talked with one advocate who worries the bill will hurt smaller farms.

A long, cold winter – like the one that is mercifully coming to a close – can be more than just an emotional drain. It can be a drain on home finances and the environment. As her home-heating bills piled up, WPSU’s Emily Reddy went in search of solutions for her energy woes. She found a program gearing up at Penn State to help homeowners just like her.

Without a queen bee a colony can't produce. For the past several years Colony Collapse Disorder has killed off roughly a third of bees every year. That means a lot of beekeepers who need new queens for their hives. Many of those queen bees are bought by mail-order from breeders in the south. But WPSU's Emily Reddy reports a group of researchers at Penn State wants to see if local bees might be a better idea.  

Former FBI director Louis Freeh
AP Photo / Matt Rourke

The long-awaited Freeh Report is unambiguous. It assigns blame for mishandling of the Jerry Sandusky scandal to four men – Penn State President Graham Spanier, Senior Vice-President Gary Schultz, Athletic Director Tim Curley and Head Football Coach Joe Paterno.

Members of the Penn State board of trustees received the report they commissioned at the same time as everyone else yesterday. An hour later, former FBI head Louis Freeh – who led the investigation – spoke about the findings in the report.

Emily Reddy / WPSU

Just over three months ago residents of a mobile home park in Central Pennsylvania were told they had to leave. The Riverdale Mobile Home Park, near Jersey Shore, had been sold. And the new owners planned to put in a water withdrawal facility to service nearby fracking activities. WPSU’s Emily Reddy went to the mobile home park in its final days.

Deb Eck stands in front of her trailer at Riverdale Mobile Home Park on the outskirts of Jersey Shore. Across the park, other residents who can afford it have their mobile homes moved elsewhere.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

At the very back of the Riverdale Mobile Home Park, farthest from the busy road out front, Deb Eck stands in front of her trailer. It’s perched on a bank overlooking the Susquehanna River, a view she enjoys.

“I mean, who wouldn’t want to wake up to seeing this every day. You know?” Eck said.

The memorial for Joe Paterno took place in Penn State's Bryce Jordan Center.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

In State College on Thursday, some 12,000 people turned out for the memorial of long-time Penn State football coach Joe Paterno. Mourners trekked in through the rain to fill Bryce Jordan Center for the memorial.

crowd at Bryce Jordan Center
Emily Reddy / WPSU

In State College on Thursday, some 12,000 people turned out for the memorial of long-time Penn State football coach Joe Paterno. Mourners trekked in through the rain to fill Bryce Jordan Center for the memorial.

Paterno statue with crowd
Emily Reddy / WPSU

A steady stream of mourners visited the bronze Joe Paterno statue outside Beaver Stadium yesterday. They went to pay homage to the legendary Penn State football coach.

Most visitors stood and contemplated the statue of Joe Paterno in silence. A few at a time, some walked up to the statue and added candles, flowers, hand-written notes, and Penn State gear to the growing pool of offerings at his feet. By mid-afternoon, someone had draped an American flag over Paterno’s upraised arm. A rosary hung from his other hand. And he wore a blue and white striped Penn State scarf.

Daryl Gregory lives in State College and writes fantasy and science fiction novels.  His new book is a collection of short stories called "Unpossible and Other Stories."

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

Penn State professor Alex Hristov
Emily Reddy / WPSU

It’s feeding time at an experimental dairy barn not far from Beaver stadium. A big square machine on wheels spits a pile of hay in front of each cow on one side of the barn, and lab assistant Chan Hee Lee pours a bucket of dried green leaf bits on top.

As the feeding machine finishes up and rolls out of the barn, Alex Hristov says they tried a lot of things before they found oregano reduced cows’ methane output.

“We started with essential oils,” Hristov said. “Lavender, mint. Citrus, onion, anything, you name it.

So why is Hristov focused on cutting methane?

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