Emily Reddy

News Director

Emily Reddy is the news director at WPSU-FM, the NPR-affiliate public radio station for central and northern Pennsylvania.

In addition to leading the news staff, Reddy creates news stories that air during Morning Edition and All Things Considered and serves as the lead producer of WPSU’s radio series BookMark and Story Corps. She sometimes fills in as an on-air host.

Reddy’s work has been recognized with a regional Edward R. Murrow Award and multiple awards from the Public Media Journalists Association and the Pennsylvania Associated Press Media Editors.

She has taught a news writing and reporting class at Penn State.

Reddy originally got hooked on radio as a volunteer reporter and news anchor for WMNF, a community radio station in her hometown of Tampa, Florida. She then went to grad school to pursue this passion professionally.

While at Boston University, Reddy produced segments for the daily news magazine show Here & Now. She also served as a general reporter in Washington D.C. for WAMU and as capitol correspondent for WNPR.

She earned a master’s degree in broadcast journalism from Boston University and a bachelor’s degree in comparative literature from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida.

She lives in Lemont in a 150-year-old former one-room schoolhouse with her husband Jonathan and her daughter Zoë.

Contact her at ereddy@psu.edu.

There will be no Sidewalk Sale at this year's Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts, but fans can attend 11 in-person musical performances.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

The Central Pennsylvania Festival of the Arts has announced that it will host an audience for live musical performances at next weekend’s mostly virtual festival. 

Eleven musical performances will take place from next Thursday through Saturday at the State College Presbyterian Church at 132 West Beaver Avenue downtown. 

Bands include Tussey Mountain Moonshiners, Callanish, Natascha and the Spy Boys, and AAA Blues Band.

Penn State football coach James Franklin speaks to reporters about the importance of COVID-19 vaccines. Penn State president Eric Barron, freshman football player Theo Johnson and Governor Tom Wolf (seated, L to R) also spoke at the event.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Governor Tom Wolf, Penn State President Eric Barron and Nittany Lions football coach James Franklin spoke together at the Pegula Ice Arena Wednesday, encouraging students to get vaccinated for COVID-19 before they leave for the summer. 

“Right now I know that this is maybe not something that is top of mind. Finals coming up, moving back home, finding summer jobs,” Wolf said. “But now that college students are eligible to get vaccinated, it is really important to make this a priority.” 

 

Photos of three persons of interest released by State College Police
State College Police Department

State College police have released photos of three persons of interest in the defacing of the Martin Luther King Jr. mural in downtown State College. 

An insignia and the words “PATRIOTFRONT.US” were stenciled onto the mural in a red substance. It was reported Friday afternoon, and happened in the overnight hours that day. 

The regional vaccination clinic at Penn State's Bryce Jordan Center is reopening with the Moderna vaccine.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Vaccinations will resume Thursday at the Regional Vaccination Clinic at the Bryce Jordan Center in State College. The clinic was briefly paused over concerns over rare blood clots in a small number of women who received the Johnson & Johnson vaccine, which was being administered at the BJC. 

The Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency and Department of Health announced Wednesday that operations would resume using the two-dose Moderna vaccine.

The regional vaccination clinic at Penn State's Bryce Jordan Center was paused pending an investigation into the Johnson & Johnson vaccine.
Mary Altaffer / AP Photo

Pennsylvania says it is following the federal government’s recommendation and pausing use of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine during an investigation into reports of unusual blood clots.

The state Department of Health told all COVID-19 vaccine providers in the state Tuesday to stop administering the single-shot Johnson & Johnson vaccine until at least April 20 “out of an abundance of caution.”

Acting Secretary of Health Alison Beam said this pause includes the Regional Vaccination Clinic that opened Friday in State College.

Deirdre Mask is the author of "The Address Book."
Deirdre Mask

For most of us having a home address isn't something we think about much, but parts of the world and even parts of the United States don't have addresses.

For Take Note, we talked with Deirdre Mask, the author of "The Address Book: What Street Addresses Reveal About Identity, Race, Wealth and Power." "The Address Book" is the Centre County Reads book for 2021. The book takes readers around the world -- to India, London, Philadelphia, South Africa, New York City and more -- to look at the importance of addresses.

A student walks on the Lock Haven University campus in Lock Haven, Pa, Saturday, Oct. 31, 2020.
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

Members of a Lock Haven University labor union will host a protest Saturday over plans from the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education, or PASSHE, to outsource more than 50 jobs. The cuts would be to clerical, custodial and maintenance workers. 

 

Shawn O’Dell is president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) labor union at Lock Haven University. She said the outsourcing would mean the loss of dedicated workers doing “family-sustaining jobs” that feed into the local economy.

 

Epidemiologist Dr. Nita Bharti
Nita Bharti

The COVID-19 vaccine is slowly rolling out across the country. Some people still have concerns about these new vaccines and their safety.

We had epidemiologist Nita Bharti answer some of those questions. Dr. Bharti is an Assistant Professor of Biology in the Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics at Penn State. She’s been educating the community about COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic. 

Penny Cracas, with the Chester County, Pa., Health Department, fills a syringe with the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine on Dec. 29, 2020.
Matt Slocum / AP Photo

Pennsylvania is expanding eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine in the initial phase of the rollout to include people age 65 and over as well as younger people with serious health conditions that put them at higher risk. State health officials made the announcement Tuesday.

Conditions that qualify residents for the vaccine include cancer, diabetes, obesity, COPD, certain heart conditions and immune deficiencies, sickle cell disease, pregnancy and being a smoker.

President Donald Trump arrives for a campaign rally at Fayetteville Regional Airport, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020, in Fayetteville, N.C.
Evan Vucci / AP Photo

President Donald Trump will hold a "Make America Great Again" rally in Martinsburg on Monday as a part of his reelection campaign.

According to Trump's campaign website, the event will take place at 4:30 p.m. at the Altoona-Blair County Airport. Doors will open at 1:30 p.m. 

Ryan Grimm
Ryan Grimm

The 75th Pennsylvania House District includes all of Elk and parts of Clearfield County, including DuBois.

Ryan Grimm is the Democratic candidate running for this seat against Republican Mike Armanini. We brought you a conversation with Armanini yesterday. 

There is no incumbent. Matt Gabler, who had represented the 75th district since 2008, decided not to run for reelection.

Mike Armanini
Mike Armanini

The 75th Pennsylvania House District includes all of Elk and parts of Clearfield County, including DuBois.

Mike Armanini is the Republican candidate running for this seat against Democrat Ryan Grimm. There is no incumbent. Matt Gabler, who had represented the 75th district since 2008, decided not to run for reelection.

Mike Armanini has worked in the powdered metal industry in Clearfield and Elk County for more than 30 years, including as co-owner of a powdered metal company. He currently works in sales at Clearfield Metal Technologies.

 

 

Penn State students shared stories of racism they have encountered at the university and faculty talked about what could lead to change, in the second roundtable discussion in the “Toward Racial Equity at Penn State” series Tuesday night. 

 

Nyla Holland, an undergrad student and president of the Black Caucus, talked about racism she’s experienced at Penn State starting freshman year.

 

Despite the coronavirus pandemic, many students are returning to colleges and universities across the U.S. 

In central Pennsylvania, that includes Penn State, Pitt Bradford, and Juniata College. 

Kevin Kinser is a Penn State professor and head of the Department of Education Policy Studies. He’s a senior scientist at Penn State’s Center for the Study of Higher Education and has written several books about higher ed. 

On May 25th, a police officer killed George Floyd while arresting him by kneeling on his neck for nearly nine minutes. Videos of Floyd’s killing have led to weeks of protests across the country and calls for police reform.

Penn State professors Eleanor Brown and Ben Jones recently wrote an OpEd that ran in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and the Philadelphia Inquirer about barriers to police reform and State College’s own police killing of a Black man with schizophrenia, Osaze Osagie. 

Old Main, the administration building, on Penn State's University Park campus
Min Xian / WPSU

In an online town hall on Monday, Penn State President Eric Barron talked with the co-chairs of the university’s new Select Presidential Commission on Racism, Bias and Community Safety about their plans for the commission. 

The university also announced the creation of scholarships to promote equity and diversity. Barron said Penn State will match up to $10 million in donations toward diversity and equity scholarships, and fund memorial scholarships named after George Floyd and Osaze Osagie.

Pre-K-12 schools in Pennsylvania were closed for the last three months of the school year that just ended, due to coronavirus concerns. Gov. Tom Wolf told schools to move to a digital learning model.

We talked about the effects of the shutdown on students with Ed Fuller, an associate professor in the College of Education at Penn State.   

TRANSCRIPT:

Emily Reddy:

Nancy and Sam McKinney
Nancy McKinney

Sam McKinney, from Kane, died from COVID-19 on May 5th. He’s the only person from McKean County so far to die from the virus. His wife, Nancy, also got sick.

WPSU’s Emily Reddy talked with Adam Bundy, Nancy’s son and Sam McKinney’s step-son.  

TRANSCRIPT 

 

Emily Reddy: 

Thank you for talking with us, and I’m so sorry for your loss.  

 

Adam Bundy:  

Thank you. 

 

Governor Tom Wolf said on Friday that he will remove most coronavirus restrictions on 17 mostly western and north-central counties on May 29. The counties moving to the “green” phase are Bradford, Cameron, Clarion, Clearfield, Crawford, Elk, Forest, Jefferson, Lawrence, McKean, Montour, Potter, Snyder, Sullivan, Tioga, Venango and Warren.

 

Wolf said he’d planned to move Centre County to green, but local officials told him they didn’t feel the county was ready yet. 

 

The Republican primary candidates for Pennsylvania’s 25th Senatorial District seat gathered Tuesday in St. Marys to introduce themselves to voters. The winner of the primary in this heavily Republican district will likely replace Joe Scarnati, who is retiring after 20 years. 

Because of coronavirus concerns, there was no audience for the candidate Q&A. The three candidates answered questions spread a few feet apart across a stage at the Shiloh Evangelical Presbyterian Church. 

Dean Lindsey on day 19 of his recovery from COVID-19.
Dean Lindsey

A couple of weeks ago, we talked with State College resident Dean Lindsey, who said he was one of the first people in Centre County to have a confirmed case of COVID-19.

Lindsey is the senior pastor at State College Presbyterian Church.

WPSU checked in with him again to see how he’s doing now. 

Emily Reddy: Dean Lindsey, thanks for talking with us again.

Dean Lindsey: Well, it's, it's good to be here and to be able to talk.

A map from the Pennsylvania Department of Health showing COVID-19 cases by county as of April 7, 2020.
Pa Department of Health

Confirmed cases of COVID-19 jumped by 11 in Centre County to a total of 55 and Elk and Jefferson County reported their first cases meaning every county in the state now has at least one confirmed case, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Health. 

With Tuesday’s DOH updates, the total number of confirmed cases in Pennsylvania is 14,559. That’s an increase of 1,462 from Monday. 

The report also marked the largest single day’s deaths, with 78 more reported since Monday.

The State College borough hung banners about the census before Penn State switched to remote learning for the rest of the spring semester.
Min Xian / WPSU

April 1 is Census Day. That means it’s usually where you live on April 1 that you give as your address when you fill out the census

But coronavirus means Penn State students who would usually be in State College are spread far and wide. Penn State and the U.S. Census are trying to get word out that students should still be counted at their school address.  

Map of PA counties with stay-at-home orders as of March 28, 2020 to slow the spread of COVID-19.
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Gov. Tom Wolf extended Pennsylvania’s stay-at-home order to include Centre County on Saturday as the number of cases in the county and state continues to rise. Wolf didn’t give specific reasons why Centre County was added, but the order is part of efforts to help stop the spread of COVID-19. 

The Department of Health announced the number of confirmed cases in Centre County is now at 15. The expansion of this order brings the total number of counties up to 22 and also includes Beaver and Washington Counties. 

 

Dean Lindsey shared a picture on Facebook on March 21, 2020 of the items on his bedside table in quarantine in his State College house.
Dean Lindsey

  

The number of cases of COVID-19 has been growing across the state and on Friday the Pennsylvania Department of Health reported the first confirmed case in Centre County. By Monday, that number was up to three. WPSU’s Emily Reddy talked with Dean Lindsey, who says he’s one of the first positive cases in Centre County. Lindsey is the Senior Pastor at State College Presbyterian Church in State College. 
 

Emily Reddy: Well, first, how did you catch COVID-19?

The YMCA of Centre County is assembling bags of food to hand out as a part of its Anti-Hunger Program. They're putting together the bags at the Moshannon Valley YMCA gym and distributing them at 14 drive-through locations around the county.
Mel Curtis / YMCA of Centre County

In response to coronavirus concerns, organizations in central Pennsylvania are finding new ways to make sure vulnerable members of the community get fed. In Centre County, both State College Area Meals on Wheels and the YMCA of Centre County are making changes to their normal processes.  

Durrwachter Alumni Conference Center building
User:Ruhrfisch - https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8138315

Lock Haven University, Juniata College and the University of Pittsburgh at Bradford are all moving to online instruction due to coronavirus concerns. All three are currently in spring break and will temporarily suspend classes next week while they prepare to move classes online starting March 23. 

State High building
Min Xian / WPSU

All schools in the State College Area School District will stay out of session for students until March 20, 2020 because of coronavirus concerns, superintendent Bob O’Donnell informed parents in an email today. 

“At this time, we believe that is the right step to take for the health and safety of our SCASD families, employees, and the community at large — especially to protect our students and employees who are immunosuppressed or at greater risk due to age and other reasons,” O’Donnell said.

Penn State associate professor Dr. Darryl Thomas and professor Dr. Gary King, who wrote "More Rivers to Cross: A Report on the Status of African American Professors at Penn State University."
Min Xian / WPSU

A new report titled "More Rivers to Cross: A Report on the Status of African American Professors at Penn State University" finds that there's a shortage of black faculty at the university and offers some reasons for why that is.

Penn State professor Dr. Gary King, and associate professor Dr. Darryl Thomas prepared the report with the input of other black faculty.

U.S. Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham visited State College to meet with local government and university officials.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

U.S. Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham visited State College Wednesday to talk about efforts to get people to take part in the count. He is visiting dozens of universities and met with Penn State president Eric Barron before visiting nearby census headquarters to talk with local government officials. 

Dillingham said they are still hiring census takers and that the coronavirus won’t stop canvassing. 

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