Former Catholic Priest Says Pennsylvania Bishop Ignored His Reports Of Abuse

Catholic bishops in Pennsylvania played a significant role in hiding the widespread sexual abuse of minors by more than 300 Catholic priests across the state, according to the results of a grand jury investigation released this week. At a news conference Tuesday, Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro emphasized that many of the current and former bishops in six Pennsylvania dioceses refused to cooperate with the grand jury. While past investigations of abuse in the Catholic Church...

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Looking for an older WPSU's Story Corps interview? Find them among our story archives.

State College Homeless Shelter
Kate Lao Shaffner

Yesterday, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked to folks with Centre County's Out of the Cold and Hearts for the Homeless programs, which seek to provide respite for the homeless during the winter months. Here's the second part of the series, about the broader issues of homelessness in the Centre region.

Whitney Hunsinger is sitting in the living room of Centre House, a homeless shelter in downtown State College. Her daughters, who are two and four, are coloring and watching TV. Hunsinger is nine months pregnant.

Yesterday, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reported on Centre County's Out of the Cold and Hearts for the Homeless programs. Today, we'll hear about the year-round reality of homelessness in State College, a town where many might assume homelessness isn't a concern.

Cot with quilt
Kate Lao Shaffner

For many of our listeners, the worst thing a colder-than-usual winter can bring is a higher heating bill.  But for the homeless, the frigid temperatures could be a matter of life and death.  How do Centre County residents who don’t have a home get out of the cold?

For many of our listeners, the worst a colder-than-usual winter can bring is an expensive heating bill. But for the homeless, the frigid temperatures could be a matter of life or death. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talks with Centre County residents about how those without homes get out of the cold.  

John Gaudlip in front of field with sprinklers.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

    

This week WPSU is taking a look at water issues in central Pennsylvania. Today, WPSU’s Emily Reddy explores the massive task of supplying and cleaning the water used by students, faculty, staff and visitors at Penn State University. 

Hearts for the Homeless, a drop-in day center located in downtown State College, opened its doors for the first time yesterday. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports.  

I was born weighing 2 pounds and 4 ounces. I was small, even for a newborn in a big world. While in the womb, the doctor gave my brother and me a low chance of survival because the umbilical cord was struggling to support us both. Despite this, we were born with no severe handicaps. By the time I was nine, however, I realized I was different from other kids my age.

At school, while other kids talked and played, I stayed at my desk. I struggled to understand what was being taught, and I was too afraid to ask for help. My mom wondered if something was wrong with me.

Joel Rubin is the Director of Policy and Government Affairs at Ploughshares Fund, a foundation dedicated preventing the use and spread of nuclear weapons. We'll talk with him about the recent Iran nuclear weapons deal and why Americans should be concerned about the state of nuclear weapons today.

Paul Sweeney

WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner shadows Penn State School of International Affairs students as they participate in a simulation of a UN peace conference centered on a complicated international issue.  

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NPR Stories

The parade of U.S. military forces through the streets of Washington, D.C., ordered up by President Trump will be delayed, according to the Department of Defense.

The parade had been planned for Veterans Day but Pentagon spokesperson Col. Rob Manning said Thursday, without explanation, that organizers would "explore opportunities in 2019."

Aretha Franklin was so Detroit. Bring her pocketbook onstage at Washington D.C.'s Kennedy Center and swing her fur coat behind her as she sits at the baby grand, Detroit. Pay Aretha in cash, Detroit. Stash that cash in her bra, Detroit. Unapologetic and black, Detroit. Lived in and represented Detroit till the day she died, Detroit.

New Mexico officials say the decomposed remains of a child found in a raid on a remote, rural property in Amalia are those of missing three-year-old Abdul-Ghani Wahhaj.

The boy was first reported missing from his home in Georgia in December. His mother, Hakima Ramzi, told authorities that the child's father, Siraj Ibn Wahhaj had said he was taking the boy to the park but the pair never returned.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Pope Francis Expresses 'Shame And Sorrow' Over Pennsylvania Abuse Allegations

After two days of silence and a barrage of criticism for failing to address the latest clergy sex abuse scandal in the United States, Pope Francis has spoken. "The Holy See condemns unequivocally the sexual abuse of minors," said a statement issued by the Vatican on Thursday. "Regarding the report made public in Pennsylvania this week, there are two words that can express the feelings faced with these horrible crimes: shame and sorrow," Vatican spokesman Greg Burke wrote. The Pennsylvania...

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Aretha Franklin: The 'Fresh Air' Interview

Aretha Franklin is more than a woman, more than a diva and more than an entertainer. Aretha Franklin is an American institution. Franklin has received plenty of honors over her decades-spanning career — so much so that the chalice of accolades runneth over. She was the first woman inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. She received the Presidential Medal of Freedom , the nation's highest civilian honor, in 2005. And Franklin sang "My Country, 'Tis Of Thee" at President Barack...

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Senate Democrats Threaten Lawsuit Over Kavanaugh Documents

Senate Democrats threatened to sue the National Archives to obtain documents from Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh's career as a White House official during President George W. Bush's administration. Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., told reporters Thursday that Democrats will file a lawsuit if the National Archives does not respond to their Freedom of Information Act request. The suit is a last-ditch effort to obtain the documents ahead of confirmation hearings set begin...

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Former Catholic Priest Says Pennsylvania Bishop Ignored His Reports Of Abuse

Catholic bishops in Pennsylvania played a significant role in hiding the widespread sexual abuse of minors by more than 300 Catholic priests across the state, according to the results of a grand jury investigation released this week. At a news conference Tuesday, Pennsylvania Attorney General Josh Shapiro emphasized that many of the current and former bishops in six Pennsylvania dioceses refused to cooperate with the grand jury. While past investigations of abuse in the Catholic Church...

Read More

Minnesota Orchestra Honors Nelson Mandela By Bringing Music To South Africa

The Minnesota Orchestra will play one of its most important gigs of the year this month — at the Regina Mundi Catholic Church in Soweto, South Africa. In doing so, it will become the first major U.S. orchestra to visit that city. The performance is part of a year of celebrations recognizing the centennial of Nelson Mandela 's birth. It makes sense for the orchestra to play in the community central to the freedom struggle which brought down apartheid. Today, the church seems to radiate peace,...

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Babies Born Dependent On Opioids Need Touch, Not Tech

Dr. Jodi Jackson has worked for years to address infant mortality in Kansas. Often, that means she is treating newborns in a high-tech neonatal intensive care unit with sophisticated equipment whirring and beeping. That is exactly the wrong place for an infant like Lili. Lili's mother, Victoria, used heroin for the first two-thirds of her pregnancy and hated herself for it. (NPR is using her first name only, because she has used illegal drugs.) "When you are in withdrawal, you feel your baby...

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Aretha Franklin: In Memoriam Playlist

Though her career carried her from the Baptist churches of Detroit to a life of platinum plaques and diamond-drizzled furs, Aretha Franklin 's voice never lost its flavor. Her ability to rouse emotion is a talent few other artists have ever been able to touch. And her piano-playing prowess, which she developed in church, was unmatched. It's the reason she earned the title of Queen of Soul in the 1960s. Explore beyond Franklin's namesake hits like "Respect" and "(You Make Me Feel Like) A...

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Life — Or Something Like It — During Wartime: The Wrenching 'Memoir Of War'

Marguerite waits in a large room for news of her husband. It is the spring of 1945 in Nazi-occupied Paris, and Germany's power is slipping, yet the S.S.'s grip over her home is only becoming bloodier. Marguerite is part of the Resistance, as was her husband, Robert, which is why the Gestapo now has him imprisoned. As she waits for her appointment, she sees a young woman exit from hers — makeup strewn, dress disfigured. She's clearly been violated. But Marguerite doesn't run. She confronts the...

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Bills And Bulletproof Backpacks: Safety Measures For A New School Year

As students prepare to go back to school, more and more parents are thinking about school safety. A recent poll found 34 percent of parents fear for their child's physical safety at school. That's almost triple the number of parents from 2013. And yet schools are among the safest places for kids . According to one study , shootings involving students have actually gone down since the 1990s. But that hasn't stopped parents, schools and lawmakers from acting on their concerns. They're beefing...

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No Veterans Day Military Parade This Year; DOD Looking At Dates In 2019

The parade of U.S. military forces through the streets of Washington, D.C., ordered up by President Trump will be delayed, according to the Department of Defense. The parade had been planned for Veterans Day but Pentagon spokesperson Col. Rob Manning said Thursday, without explanation, that organizers would "explore opportunities in 2019." The announcement followed the latest estimate of $92 million for the cost of the display , a figure media outlets attributed to unnamed U.S. officials....

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Hundreds Of Newspapers Denounce Trump's Attacks On Media In Coordinated Editorials

Updated at 10:04 a.m. ET More than 300 news publications across the country are joining together to defend the role of a free press and denounce President Trump's ongoing attacks on the news media in coordinated editorials publishing Thursday, according to a tally by The Boston Globe. The project was spearheaded by staff members of the editorial page at the Globe, who write: "This relentless assault on the free press has dangerous consequences. We asked editorial boards from around the...

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Aretha Franklin, The 'Queen Of Soul,' Dies At 76

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fzPXozDgvYs https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujRur_sDjgM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G1p92gQTQCg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53qpjd7jJYo https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MJA1QRND3aw Updated at 12:10 p.m. ET Aretha Franklin, the "Queen of Soul," died Thursday in her home city of Detroit after battling pancreatic cancer of the neuroendocrine type. Her death was confirmed by her publicist, Gwendolyn Quinn. She was 76. Franklin sold more than 75 million...

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NPR's "Planet Money/How I Built This"

Saturdays at 7:00am: “Planet Money” and “How I Built This” are two half-hour shows that together make a one-hour weekly program on business and entrepreneurship from NPR.

The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

It's Folk Season

The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through December, when the Metropolitain Opera Radio Season begins again.

Get The New Free WPSU App!

Take public media anywhere you go with the WPSU mobile app available for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android and Amazon devices.

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Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings, 8:00-10:00am; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.