Taiwan's High Court Rules Same-Sex Marriage Is Legal, In A First For Asia

Taiwanese laws that prohibit same-sex couples from marrying violate their personal freedom and equal protection, the island's Constitutional Court ruled Wednesday. The justices called sexual orientation an "immutable characteristic that is resistant to change." "The judges have today said yes to marriage equality," said Amnesty International's Lisa Tassi, who directs campaigns in East Asia. "This is a huge step forward for LGBTI rights in Taiwan and will resonate across Asia." Taiwan's...

Read More

This I Believe: I Believe In Second Impressions

Apr 14, 2011

I was just shy of 17 the first time my brother Daniel introduced me to his girlfriend. Her name was Kristen, and I hated her immediately. But my brother loved her. Granted, I may not have known what love was, but in my teenage years, love meant a brother who would rather be with his girlfriend than with his siblings. Call it what you want *cough* jealously *cough*, but I wasn’t happy.

This I Believe: I Believe Life Should Be "Pun"derful

Mar 24, 2011

One morning, I called the local barbershop to make an appointment. Unfortunately, the barber was all booked up for the day. 

"Well, this is a hairy situation," I said to my girlfriend as I hung up the phone. She replied, "They certainly left you stranded." 

Call me a pundit, a glutton for punishment, or just a "pun"derful guy…I believe in puns. 

You want to spice up any conversation, here's some sage advice. Have a little fun with it. That's why it's called a “play on words” after all. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal. 

Lyndsie Wszola is a Penn State student.

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

This I Believe: I Believe In Heavy Metal

Mar 11, 2010

I believe heavy metal.
 
When I was 12 years old I saw Metallica’s music video for the song, “One.” The video mixes gritty black and white band footage with excerpts from the film Johnny Got His Gun about a hospitalized soldier who lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and speech to a landmine. Over this footage, “One” goes from lament to unstoppable barrage.
 
I believed this song.
 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

This I Believe: I Believe In Public Radio

Apr 2, 2009

For many people, April 15 is TAX DAY! April 15 for me, however, has a different significance…

In 1982, I moved to a small mountain town in Colorado. I thought I’d found the perfect place to live. But there was one thing missing. No public radio. I used to spin the FM dial searching for the voice of the community.  All I would hear was canned music or talk programs packaged somewhere far away and made local only by the commercials injected.

This I Believe: I Believe In Slowing Down

Feb 5, 2009

On a rainy morning when I was ten, my neighbor Mr. Lovett invited me into his home for a woodworking project. Above his fireplace sat an ornate eagle carved by Mr. Lovett himself. Its wingspan was wider than I was tall. I remember wondering how long it took him to make that eagle.

Mr. Lovett guided my block of wood under the scroll saw until it morphed into the rough outline of a duck.

Pages

NPR Stories

Melania Trump accompanied the president to the Vatican Wednesday, wearing a black veil and long-sleeved, Dolce and Gabbana black dress.

"It's so heartbreaking because so many little ones attend our shows ... I just keep thinking about them," Ariana Grande's drummer wrote on Tuesday.

Taiwanese laws that prohibit same-sex couples from marrying violate their personal freedom and equal protection, the island's Constitutional Court ruled Wednesday. The justices called sexual orientation an "immutable characteristic that is resistant to change."

"The judges have today said yes to marriage equality," said Amnesty International's Lisa Tassi, who directs campaigns in East Asia. "This is a huge step forward for LGBTI rights in Taiwan and will resonate across Asia."

Get More NPR News

Why The Russia Investigation Matters And Why You Should Care

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaJGgYiybzk https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-luMIpmjZlo Updated at 11:13 a.m. ET Some people have FOMO that they might miss an Orlando Bloom waitress update. Others have a fear of missing out when it comes to the latest on whether Michael Flynn is going to turn over documents that have been requested by Congress — and what's going to happen next in the Russia investigation. Your author is in the latter category — and doesn't really know how much people care...

Read More

Police Cite 'Network' In Manchester Bombing Investigation, As More Arrests Are Made

Updated at 1 p.m. ET Police officers arrested four more men Wednesday as part of the investigation into Monday's bombing at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England. A separate police raid targeted an apartment in the center of town. "I think it's very clear that this is a network that we are investigating," Greater Manchester Police Chief Ian Hopkins said in an update on the case. His remarks go a step further than previous statements, in which officials said they were trying to learn...

Read More

Medical Research, Health Care Face Deep Cuts In Trump Budget

This story was updated on May 24 to clarify include new information on proposed cuts to Medicaid. The proposed budget unveiled Tuesday by the Trump administration doubles down on major cuts to biomedical research; programs to fight infectious disease outbreaks; health care for the poor, elderly and disabled; and prevention of HIV/AIDS. It restates the goals of the "skinny budget" the administration released in March, which was widely condemned by scientists and public health advocates. Mick...

Read More

In Some Rural Counties, Hunger Is Rising, But Food Donations Aren't

One in eight Americans — 42 million people — still struggles to get enough to eat. And while that number has been going down recently, hunger appears to be getting worse in some economically distressed areas, especially in rural communities. Food banks that serve these areas are also feeling the squeeze, as surplus food supplies dwindle but the lines of people seeking help remain long. As a result, food banks such as Feeding America Southwest Virginia are trying to shorten those lines by...

Read More

Vigil Honors Manchester Victims; Across The Globe People Are Mournful

Thousands of people in Manchester, England, defied a terror warning and poured into the streets Tuesday for a vigil honoring the victims of the Manchester Arena bombing. A bombing the night before at an Ariana Grande concert killed at least 22 people and wounded dozens more. Authorities identified the attacker as 22-year-old Salman Abedi and have arrested several people in connection with the blast. Hours before the vigil, British Prime Minister Theresa May announced that another attack could...

Read More

This Land Is ... Cut Under Trump's Budget?

Rural communities dependent on U.S. public lands for everything from outdoor recreation to hunting to livestock grazing could be hit hard under the Trump administration's latest budget proposal unveiled Tuesday . Still subject to approval by Congress, the president's budget includes a roughly $1.4 billion cut to the Department of Interior and far deeper cuts to the Department of Agriculture: combined the two agencies own and manage more than 700 million acres of public lands, mostly in the...

Read More

Why Colleges Already Face Race-Related Challenges In Serving Future Students

Today, more Americans graduate high school and go on to college than ever before. But as the country becomes more diverse — the Census Bureau expects that by 2020 more than half of the nation's children will be part of a minority race or ethnic group — are colleges and universities ready to serve them? "If you look at the past 50, almost 60 years, you see we have made a lot of progress as a country in terms of high school seniors deciding to go to college in the 1.5 years after graduating,"...

Read More

Detecting Life In Space: The Red Edge

The universe's "most interesting star" just started acting up again. Known as KIC 8462852 , or the WTF star (for "Where's The Flux"), this sun became famous a few years ago for its strange short-lived dips in light output. Its behavior was weird enough that astronomers added "alien megastructures" to the long list of possible explanations for WTF star's changes in brightness. My twitter feed was lighting up this weekend as WTF star started, once again, to show a pronounced diminution. The...

Read More

What's the Consensus on Consent?

A recent paper from the Columbia Journal of Gender and Law on the nonconsensual removal of condoms — called stealthing — has pushed discussions on consent further into the national conversation. Saying yes or no to a sexual advance should be straightforward. How do we clarify the rules on sexual consent? GUESTS Alexandra Brodsky , Fellow, National Womens Law Center; co-founder, Know Your IX Kristen Houser , Chief Public Affairs Officer, National Sexual Violence Resource Center Jackson Katz ,...

Read More

Fox News Retracts DNC Staffer Conspiracy Story, But Hannity Keeps It Alive

The Fox News Channel has retracted a week-old story based on a groundless conspiracy theory involving the death of a staffer for the Democratic National Committee, conceding it did not meet the network's standards. The retracted May 16 online story claimed to report as fact that the late Seth Rich, a 27-year-old Democratic National Committee staffer, was actually the person who leaked tens of thousands of emails from the DNC to WikiLeaks and that his murder was tied to that action. Rich was...

Read More

Report: Trump Asked Intel Heads To Push Back On FBI Russia Probe

President Trump asked two top U.S. intelligence chiefs to push back against the FBI's investigation into possible collusion between Russia and his presidential campaign, the Washington Post reported Monday evening. According to the Post , the president made the request to Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats and National Security Agency Director Adm. Mike Rogers shortly after then-FBI Director James Comey — who Trump fired almost two weeks ago — confirmed the existence of the FBI...

Read More

How The Biggest Animal On Earth Got So Big

Whales are the largest animals on the planet, but they haven't always been giants. Fossil records show that ancient whales were much smaller than the currently living behemoths. So when did whales get so big, and how? A new study suggests it might be due to changes in climate that affected the food that some whales eat: krill and small fish. Instead of being spread throughout the ocean, lots of krill started being packed into a small area. Bigger whales were simply more efficient at eating...

Read More

GOP Bill Could Undercut Some Coverage In Job-Based Insurance

Would the House Republican health care bill impact insurance provided by employers? And why don't people without insurance just go to an emergency room for regular care? Here are answers to those and other recent questions from readers. Will employer-based health care be affected by the new Republican plan? The American Health Care Act , which recently passed the House, would fundamentally change the individual insurance market, and it could significantly alter coverage for people who get...

Read More

'We Can Use Peace,' President Trump Says After Exchanging Gifts With Pope

During papal audiences with heads of state, the exchange of gifts comes after the private encounter and at the end of the event. It offers the press a chance to witness the body language of the two leaders and listen in as they explain their gifts. It also offers a glimpse of what the two leaders think of each other. For example, Pope Francis gave President Trump a large medallion depicting an olive branch as a symbol of peace. The pope said, "I give this to you so that you can be an...

Read More

3.3 Million-Year-Old Fossil Sheds Light On How The Spine Evolved

A remarkably complete fossil of a young child suggests that key elements of the human spinal structure were already in place in an ancient human relative 3.3 million years ago. The child, about three years old, likely died suddenly and quickly drifted into a body of water, where she was covered in sediment that eventually hardened to sandstone, Zeray Alemseged of the University of Chicago tells The Two-Way. His team found the well-preserved fossil in 2000 in Dikika, Ethiopia, and for years...

Read More

Me, Myself, and IKEA: What Our Love For Swedish Furniture Says About Narcissism

It's normal to feel drawn to people you share something with — whether that's a name, or a birthday, or a shared profession or background. But Brett Pelham finds this preference for things and people associated with us goes far beyond what we might expect. He calls this phenomenon Implicit Egotism. "There's at least a modest tendency for women named Georgia to gravitate towards Georgia, women named Virginia to gravitate towards Virginia, and the more closely the name resembles the state, the...

Read More

Congress and Farmers Are Shocked By Proposed USDA Cuts

Top officials at the U.S. Department of Agriculture didn't even try to act enthusiastic as they unveiled details of their agency's proposed 2018 budget , which includes drastic cuts in spending. "We're going to do the best we can," said Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. "It's my job to implement that plan." The broad outlines of this budget, with its 20 percent cut in the USDA's discretionary spending, had been released two months ago. This week, it became clear exactly what the Trump...

Read More

Nacho Cheese Sauce Tainted With Botulism Kills California Man

A rare outbreak of botulism has hospitalized nine people and killed one man in northern California, health officials say. The outbreak began early last month when several people fell ill after eating nacho cheese sauce bought at a gas station in Walnut Grove, Calif., just outside Sacramento. Health officials removed four batches of nacho cheese sauce from the Valley Oak Food and Fuel gas station on May 5. Now, that cheese has tested positive for the botulinum toxin, the California Department...

Read More

WPSU commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War.

Tell us about your experiences during that divisive time. Share your memories and commentary, in your own words, photos, video or audio, at the link below.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

Add your voice!

Write an essay for WPSU's This I Believe or BookMark.

It's Folk Season

Now that the Metropolitain Opera radio season has ended, The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through the end of November.

WPSU Podcasts

Subscribe to our podcasts and stay on top of your world with WPSU.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

On-Air Schedule

Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.