Q&A: What Does The Senate Health Bill Mean For Me?

Since Senate Republicans released the draft of their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act last week, many people have been wondering how the proposed changes will affect their own coverage, and their family's: Will my pre-existing condition be covered? Will my premiums go up or down? The bill is still a work in progress, but we've taken a sampling of questions from All Things Considered listeners and answered them, based on what we know now. Q: My husband and I are both in our...

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White House Suspects Syria Is Preparing For Another Chemical Attack

The White House announced Monday night that it sees signs that the Syrian government is preparing to launch another chemical weapons attack in its war against insurgents. The White House press office released this statement: "The United States has identified potential preparations for another chemical weapons attack by the Assad regime that would likely result in the mass murder of civilians, including innocent children. The activities are similar to preparations the regime made before its...

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The ex-Army intelligence analyst responsible for the biggest leak of classified material in U.S. history is now officially known as Chelsea Elizabeth Manning.

From his home base in Shanghai, Frank Langfitt keeps track of a wide swath of North and East Asia. He's recently back from Myanmar, where he went for (mostly) fun.

Seven years after a violent split, the two main Palestinian factions said Wednesday that they are attempting to reconcile and form a national unity government within five weeks.

The Palestine Liberation Organization and Hamas have tried several times to resolve their feud, but those efforts quickly unraveled.

So will this attempt fare any better?

Forget wearables, let's talk about inflatables.

Volvo's new child safety seat concept is a fully inflatable device designed to make what's normally a clunky and heavy seat both lighter and more portable.

So compact is this prototype that it goes from a stylish-looking backpack into a rear-facing car seat in less than a minute. You can pump it in the car — the seat comes with its own pump — and it's Bluetooth-connected so you could pump it remotely.

When inflated, the seat weighs just under 11 pounds.

President Obama, at the start of a four-stop trip to Asia, sought to reassure Japan that the U.S. is on its side in a dispute with China over the tiny Senkaku islands chain, which has led to bluster and naval jockeying between the two countries in recent years.

Growing up in West Virginia in the 1960s and '70s, Susan Brown would have a slice of salt rising bread, toasted, for Saturday morning breakfast. Her grandmother baked the bread with the mysterious and misleading name.

There's little or no salt in the recipe. No yeast, either. The bread rises because of bacteria in the potatoes or cornmeal and the flour that goes into the starter.

The taste is as distinctive as the recipe. Salt rising bread is dense and white, with a fine crumb and cheese-like flavor.

Thousands of nonviolent drug offenders serving time in federal prison could be eligible to apply for early release under new clemency guidelines announced Wednesday by the Justice Department.

Details of the initiative, which would give President Obama more options under which he could grant clemency to drug offenders serving long prison sentences, were announced by Deputy Attorney General James Cole.

An American journalist operating in eastern Ukraine has been kidnapped by pro-Russian gunmen, the separatists said Wednesday.

Simon Ostrovsky, working for Vice News, was seized at gunpoint early Tuesday by masked men in the restive eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk.

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MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to go back to a story that we've turned to a number of times on this program. We're talking about the move in many countries in Africa to toughen legal penalties and increase the stigma against homosexuality.

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On Tuesday the Department of Labor got closer to dismantling an Obama-era overtime regulation that has been in limbo for months and would make millions of Americans eligible for additional pay. The department sent a formal request for information on the rule to the Office of Management and Budget.

The director John Woo, whose filmography contains an aggregate body count in the quadruple digits, has frequently observed that action movies and musicals are close cousins. He's right about that, and I offer into evidence Edgar Wright's intoxicating new chase flick Baby Driver as Exhibit A.

Little Rock, Ark., is the latest front in the ongoing battle over Ten Commandments monuments on government property.

A six-foot-tall granite monument of the Commandments was installed on the grounds of the Arkansas State Capitol on Tuesday, flanked by the state senator who raised the money to pay for it and sponsored the legislation that required it.

Queen Elizabeth II is set to get a raise, with much of the money going toward sprucing up Buckingham Palace, reports the BBC.

The annual so-called Sovereign Grant is ballooning to £82 million (or $105 million) up 8 percent from last year. In addition to palace upkeep, it goes toward staff salaries and official travel.

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Ethics Group Says U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley's Retweet Violated A Federal Law

A watchdog group says a top Trump appointee violated a federal law by retweeting one of President Trump's tweets. In a letter sent Tuesday to the Office of Special Counsel, Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) requested an investigation into whether the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Nikki Haley, improperly used Twitter for political activity. CREW charges that Haley violated the Hatch Act , which prohibits executive branch employees from using their "official...

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Making U.S. Elections More Secure Wouldn't Cost Much But No One Wants To Pay

What would it cost to protect the nation's voting systems from attack? About $400 million would go a long way, say cybersecurity experts. It's not a lot of money when it comes to national defense — the Pentagon spent more than that last year on military bands alone — but getting funds for election systems is always a struggle. At a Senate intelligence committee hearing last week about Russian hacking during last year's election , Jeanette Manfra , the acting deputy under secretary for...

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GOP Senate Bill Would Cut Health Care Coverage By 22 Million

Updated at 8:10 pm ET Congressional forecasters say a Senate bill that aims to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act would leave 22 million more people uninsured by 2026. That's only slightly fewer uninsured than a version passed by the House in May . Monday's report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office could give moderate senators concerned about health care coverage pause. Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, was quick to register her opposition to the bill. Senate Republican...

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From Birth To Death, Medicaid Affects The Lives Of Millions

Medicaid is the government health care program for the poor.

That's the shorthand explanation. But Medicaid is so much more than that — which is why it has become the focal point of the battle in Washington to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. President Barack Obama expanded Medicaid under his signature health care law to cover 11 million more people, bringing the total number of people covered up to 69 million . Now Republicans want to reverse...

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Massive Ransomware Attack Hits Ukraine; Experts Say It's Spreading Globally

Updated at 5:57 p.m. ET Ransomware hit at least six countries Tuesday, including Ukraine, where it was blamed for a large and coordinated attack on key parts of the nation's infrastructure, from government agencies and electric grids to stores and banks. The malware has been called "Petya" — but there is debate in the security community over whether the ransomware is new or a variant that has been enhanced to make it harder to stop. In either case, it appears to be spreading globally, raising...

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3 Chicago Police Officers Accused Of Cover-Up In Killing Of Laquan McDonald

A grand jury indicted three Chicago police officers on felony charges on Tuesday, accusing them of conspiring to cover up the facts of a fatal police shooting in October 2014 of a black teenager in order to shield their fellow officer. Officer Jason Van Dyke, who is white, shot 17-year-old Laquan McDonald 16 times, according to prosecutors. Dashcam footage, eventually released under a court order more than a year after the killing, showed Van Dyke shooting McDonald as he walked away from the...

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What A Medicaid Rollback Would Mean For Millions Of Americans

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is trying to wrangle the votes he needs to pass a health care bill by the end of the week. But a growing number of Republican senators have said they will not support it. Conservatives want costs slashed even further, but moderates are concerned about the proposed rollback of Medicaid benefits for millions of people. Here & Now s Robin Young speaks with Matt Salo , executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors, about what a...

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High Court To Hear Case Of Cake Shop That Refused To Bake For Same-Sex Wedding

The Supreme Court has agreed to take up a case on whether the owner of a Colorado cake shop can refuse to provide service to same-sex couples due to his religious beliefs about marriage. Jack Phillips, who along with his wife owns Masterpiece Cakeshop in suburban Denver, has argued that a state law compelling him to produce wedding cakes for gay couples, which runs counter to his religious beliefs, violates his right to free speech under the First Amendment. David Mullins and Charlie Craig,...

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Q&A: What Does The Senate Health Bill Mean For Me?

Since Senate Republicans released the draft of their bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act last week, many people have been wondering how the proposed changes will affect their own coverage, and their family's: Will my pre-existing condition be covered? Will my premiums go up or down? The bill is still a work in progress, but we've taken a sampling of questions from All Things Considered listeners and answered them, based on what we know now. Q: My husband and I are both in our...

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Supreme Court Revives Parts Of Trump's Travel Ban As It Agrees To Hear Case

The Supreme Court says it will decide the fate of President Trump's revised travel ban, agreeing to hear arguments over immigration cases that were filed in federal courts in Hawaii and Maryland and allowing parts of the ban that has been on hold since March to take effect. The justices removed the two lower courts' injunctions against the ban "with respect to foreign nationals who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States," narrowing the scope of those...

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CNN Resignations A Sign Of The High Stakes In Covering Trump's Administration

Three investigative journalists at CNN have resigned after the network retracted a story about a congressional inquiry into a link between a Russian investment fund and an American financier who is an adviser to President Trump. Those departing are a past Pulitzer Prize winner, a finalist for the award and a senior editor who had been at CNN since 2001. The resignations are a sign of the stakes for CNN. The cable channel has beefed up its investigative team with major hires from The New York...

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Considering Breast-Feeding? This Guide Can Help

There's a big push in the U.S. from pediatricians to have mothers of newborns breast-feed exclusively for at least six months. And many new moms want to. But only about 60 percent who start off breast-feeding keep it up for six months or more, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
Shots interviewed nearly a dozen lactation consultants, pediatricians and researchers who had tips for women on how to reach their breast-feeding goals. Here's a quick guide to their...

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Senate GOP Leaders Push Off Health Care Vote Until After July 4th

Updated 3:30 p.m. ET With their health care bill facing a perilous path, Senate Republican leaders have decided to push off a vote until after Congress returns from next week's July Fourth recess, GOP aides confirm to NPR's Susan Davis. "We're still working toward getting at least 50 people in a comfortable place," Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday at a press conference on Capitol Hill. Despite the delay, McConnell confirmed that Republican senators were heading to the White...

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How The Erie Canal, About To Turn 200, Helped Build The Empire State

July 2017 marks the 200th anniversary of the start of construction on the Erie Canal. It was completed in 1825 and linked Lake Erie in Buffalo with the Hudson River in Albany, making it possible to move materials and goods from the Midwest to New York City. The canal was a feat of engineering in its day, and it transformed upstate New York and turned New York City into the biggest port in the country and one of the most important centers for commerce, trade and finance in the world. Here &...

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From Film Stars To Naturalists, These Lives Have Become Boozy Inspirations

If you've never heard of Alexander von Humboldt , a once world-renowned Prussian scientist who predicted man-made climate change in 1800 and was an adviser to President Thomas Jefferson, then a New Hampshire distillery is aiming to change that, one glass at a time. "One of the things that really struck a chord with us was that Humboldt was fascinated by nature, and we're fascinated by it, too," says Jamie Oakes of Tamworth Distilling . "We'll take a walk through a sunny pine grove and then...

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Same-Sex Marriage Support At All-Time High, Even Among Groups That Opposed It

Support for same-sex marriage is growing — even among groups traditionally opposed to it — according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center. The report, based on a survey conducted earlier this month, suggests public opinion is shifting quickly, two years after the Supreme Court's Obergefell v. Hodges made same-sex marriage legal in all 50 states . Overall support for same-sex marriage is at its highest level since the Pew Center began polling on the issue more than two decades ago, at 62...

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With Chemistry And Care, Conservators Keep Masterpieces Looking Their Best

Behind the scenes at major art museums, conservators are hard at work, keeping masterpieces looking their best. Their methods are meticulous — and sometimes surprising. The painting conservation studio at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., is filled with priceless works sitting on row after row of tall wooden easels, or lying on big, white-topped worktables. The studio is where I first met Senior Conservator Ann Hoenigswald years ago as she was fixing the sky on one of Claude...

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Story Corps Lock Haven on WPSU

WPSU is traveling to PA towns to collect oral history recordings. Hear stories from Lock Haven Mon & Wed in June & July during Morning Edition & All Things Considered on WPSU.

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WPSU commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War.

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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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It's Folk Season

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