Marijuana

Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman
Min Xian / WPSU

The lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania, John Fetterman, has been crisscrossing the state to hear what people have to say about legalizing recreational marijuana in Pennsylvania. The “listening tour” follows Fetterman’s election as lieutenant governor. Before that, he had begun to serve in his fourth term as mayor of Braddock. Fetterman is known for his unconventional approach to politics, winning his first term as mayor by one vote. WPSU's Anne Danahy spoke with Fetterman about legalizing marijuana, Gov.

Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman (second from right) polled the audience during his listening tour on recreational marijuana in State College on April 16, 2019.
Min Xian / WPSU

Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman’s listening tour on recreational marijuana made its stop in Centre County Tuesday. The overwhelming majority of those who spoke supported legalization of recreational marijuana.

A retired state police officer said he believes marijuana doesn’t make people violent and that prosecution of pot related crimes is too harsh.

Lt. Gov. John Fetterman
Anne Danahy / WPSU

Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman was in DuBois Thursday night as part of his statewide listening tour on legalizing recreational marijuana. Most of the people who spoke at the event support legalization.

“All I want to do is have a little puff," a retired school teacher told Fetterman to applause from the crowd.

The former teacher said he’d like to be able to smoke marijuana without worrying about getting into trouble. He was one of about two dozen people who spoke in favor of legalizing recreational marijuana.

Medical marijuana
Cresco Yeltrah

Medical marijuana has been legalized in Pennsylvania. With the changes come new rules and regulations. 

Pennsylvania Safe Access held an information session in the State College Borough Building Thursday evening. Organization founder Christy Billett was there to answer questions.

“Really, it’s just about talking about it. Letting people realize the face to the patient, and that maybe cannabis is better than some of the pharmaceuticals that they’re taking,” Billett said.

Medical marijuana and how it’s being implemented in Pennsylvania was the focus of the main morning session Tuesday during the annual conference of Pennsylvania planners. 

There are many unsettled questions surrounding the new arena of legal medical pot in Pennsylvania.

Who reviewed the medical marijuana applications. What will happen to growers who aren’t up and running in six months. And will businesses be able to get financial backing from banks.

Gov. Tom Wolf
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Governor Tom Wolf is saying he thinks more can be done to cut down on marijuana arrests in Pennsylvania.

In an interview on WITF’s Smart Talk, Wolf said in some municipalities, decriminalization is already underway. He noted that prosecutors are using their discretion to downgrade punishments for possession of small amounts of marijuana.

However, the governor said more “systematic” action still needs to be taken.

The State College borough council meeting on August 1, 2016.
Erin Cassidy Hendrick / WPSU

The State College borough council voted to reduce simple marijuana possession from a misdemeanor to a summary offense. 

State College police chief Tom King says this will likely not have a big impact on the borough’s police force. He said, “It will be used very infrequently because we have very few cases that are only small amounts of marijuana.”

In a video released yesterday, Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Katie McGinty said she supports the ordinance. 

The State College borough council at their meeting on May 2, 2016.
Erin Cassidy Hendrick / WPSU

At a State College borough council meeting in May, Mill Creek resident Christy Billett made an emotional appeal to the board, telling them how getting charged with marijuana possession derailed her life. 

The State College Borough Council meeting on May 2nd, 2016.
Erin Cassidy Hendrick / WPSU

Last night, the State College Borough Council held a public hearing on a proposal to reduce penalties for marijuana possession within the borough from a misdemeanor to a fine.

The audience was overwhelmingly in favor, with only 2 community members speaking against the ordinance.

Penn State College Democrats President Veronica Weyhrauch spoke in favor. “These are young people trying to start their lives, trying to start their careers and they shouldn’t be burdened with a misdemeanor,” she said.