Altoona

Anna Foley/WPSU

In the upcoming election, the citizens of Altoona won't just get to vote for a governor or senator, they'll also decide whether they want to change their current form of local government from Third Class City code to home rulehome rule designation essen

Altoona Forum
Kate Lao Shaffner/WPSU

Altoona area residents who came to the Keystone Crossroads/WPSU public forum described their hometown with these words:

  • full of promise
  • sad
  • isolated
  • a nice place to raise a family
  • nostalgic (some say to a fault)

And the word "nativism" came up a fair amount. This simultaneous nostalgia, sadness and hope was a common theme in discussions among the 60 people who attended the forum at Penn State Altoona's Devorris Downtown Center on Tuesday evening.

What are the issues facing Pennsylvania’s cities and towns? That’s the question being explored by a new public radio project called Keystone Crossroads. WPSU is a part of this project and tomorrow in Altoona we’ll be holding a forum to find out what you think we should be reporting on. WPSU’s Emily Reddy talked with Keystone Crossroads’ editor, Naomi Starobin, about the project and the forum.

The forum takes place Oct. 7 from 7-9pm with registration and refreshments starting at 6:30pm. Click here to sign up so we'll know you're coming.

You are invited to the Keystone Crossroads Community Forum.

Pennsylvania’s cities and towns are full of promise, but plagued by problems. Chronic issues such as crumbling infrastructure, underfunded schools, and dwindling tax base are holding cities back.

What can Pennsylvania’s cities, large and small, do to address their problems and fulfill their promise? We’d like to hear what you think.

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