Miles Bryan

Phone: 307-766-5086

Email: pbryan@uwyo.edu

Miles previously worked at American Public Media’s Marketplace and National Public Radio’s Los Angeles bureau. His work has appeared on NPR’s Morning Edition, Weekend Edition, and on public radio stations across the Northwest. Miles grew up in Minneapolis. He moonlights as a rock guitarist.

Penn Medicine's frontline workers receive the first round of COVID-19 vaccines on Dec. 16, 2020.
Penn Medicine

After weeks of record high coronavirus case numbers, the pandemic in Pennsylvania is finally starting to ebb — but the commonwealth isn’t out of the woods yet.

Currently, there are 5,529 people hospitalized in Pennsylvania with COVID-19, nearly double the peak last spring. The statewide percent positivity rate for COVID-19 tests is 15%. But both of those numbers are now trending down, Secretary of Health Dr. Rachel Levine announced Monday.

In this Nov. 11, 2020, file photo, a medical worker operates a testing tent at a COVID-19 mobile testing site in the Brooklyn borough of New York.
John Minchillo, File / AP Photo

Pennsylvania is reporting 9,797 new COVID-19 cases and 107 deaths for Sunday and Monday. That brings the statewide case total to 361,464, and the death toll to 10,383 people.

More people are now hospitalized with COVID-19 in Pennsylvania than during the peak of the surge last spring, according to data shared by the state’s Department of Health Monday.

Melissa Durko, a baker, and her boyfriend, Drew Heaton, a chef, sit in the backyard of their South Philadelphia rowhouse. Neither will vote in the upcoming presidential election as a matter of principle.
Emma Lee / WHYY

Debra Beckey thinks the country needs change in November.

In the 62-year-old Wynnewood resident’s mind, things have gone downhill under President Donald Trump. The rich aren’t paying enough in taxes. The coronavirus has spread unnecessarily.

Democratic candidate Joe Biden deserves a shot, says the retired drug counselor.

“I really think it’s time to get someone else,” she said. “I just don’t want to see Trump get in office again.”

As a resident of a crucial swing state that could determine the presidency, Beckey’s vote is coveted.

Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx discussed the Jussie Smollett case with staff after she publicly said she was recusing herself, newly released documents show.

For a lot of us, the hospital's emergency room is a stressful place.

Not so for Glenn Baker.

When Baker, 44, steps into the emergency room at the University of Illinois Hospital in Chicago, he's completely comfortable.

He has a favorite double-wide chair in the corner, knows where to find the Cheetos in the vending machine, and the staff is like family.

Pocatello, Idaho, and Laramie, Wyo., might not be the first places you think of leading the charge to protect the LGBT community from discrimination. But in these rural, Republican-led states, local governments are taking the matter into their own hands.

Twenty-year-old college student CylieAnn Erickson was in the room when the city council in Laramie passed its LGBT anti-discrimination bill earlier this year. She says that when the final vote was counted, she breathed a sigh of relief.

Kimberley Enyart was never interested in doing recreational drugs. But then she was in a car accident — and her doctor prescribed a powerful opiate for the pain.

"It just would put me off in la-la land, and make me feel better," she says. "I loved it. I loved that high."

When Enyart's prescription ran out, she did whatever she could to convince other doctors that she needed more. Eventually, she moved on to dentists.

"I even had two back teeth pulled over it," she says.

Forrest Hampton is about to become a family man and he couldn't be happier. He's 25 and he lives in a suburb of Dallas with his fiancée, who's due to have their baby practically any minute. They've already picked out a name: Raven.

In most ways they are a normal family. Except for one thing. Until last year, Hampton was a registered sex offender.

"I honestly don't believe I was supposed to be registered in the first place," he says, "but I wasn't in the position to fight my case."

It's a beautiful day and Jeremy Smith, the business manager for a school district in northern Wyoming, is showing off the new Tongue River Elementary School — or at least the plot of land where the school should be.

"What you're going to see when you get up here a little bit closer is you are going to just see pasture," Smith says.

The school was supposed to be under construction by now, but last month state officials said they didn't have the money.