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BBC News reaches about 40 million adults in the UK every week - its international services are consumed by an additional 239 million adults around the world. Material is brought into the BBC by its newsgathering staff of more than 8,500, with more than 40 international bureaus and seven in the UK. BBC News is one of the largest operations of its kind in the world.

How To Sell Things And Influence People

Jun 14, 2017

Social media has changed the way we interact with a lot of things: television, dating and, of course, advertising.

A shooting this morning at a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia left several people, including House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, a staffer and two law enforcement officers wounded.

Police say they believe they have the shooter in custody.

The WAMU newsroom is following the story and their reporters will give us an update.

GUESTS

Attorney General Jeff Sessions started his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee by calling any suggestion that he colluded with Russians during the election a “detestable” lie.

What's Next For Health Care In The Senate?

Jun 13, 2017

News broke Monday evening that Senate Republicans were apparently working on a repeal to the Affordable Care Act without plans to share drafts of it with other lawmakers or the public. The bill is expected to be sent to the Congressional Budget Office for scoring soon, and a vote before July 4 has been promised.

The secrecy and fast-tracking has angered many Democrats, who want more say and sunlight in the process.

GUESTS

The 51st State?

Jun 13, 2017

Puerto Ricans are American citizens, without all the benefits of folks from the mainland. The island recently voted in favor of lobbying the U.S. government for statehood, though less than a third of the population cast ballots.

The U.S. territory faces a crushing debt, one that would be easier to resolve if it was a state. So why the low turnout? And should America treat Puerto Rico like a state, or a colony?

GUESTS

Conservative critics are attacking a production of William Shakespeare’s “Julius Caesar” that’s running in New York. The basics of the play are the same as they’ve been since 1599 — the title character is deemed “ambitious” and is murdered in the Roman Senate on the Ides of March. But that’s not what has drawn controversy to the latest production.

By 2025, two million jobs will be unfilled because U.S. companies won’t be able to find the skilled labor they need. Many of these jobs provide a middle-class salary — some pay six figures annually — and don’t require a four-year-degree.

Last year’s shooting at the Pulse nightclub was the nation’s deadliest terror attack since 9-11. Some in the LGBT community began raising money to take on the NRA

As the country marks this anniversary, are LGBT people any better protected from gun violence? LGBT activism and the gun control debate one year after the Pulse nightclub shooting.

Friday News Roundup - International

Jun 9, 2017

The Islamic State says it was behind attacks in Iran, after attacking London. President Trump picks a fight with London’s mayor just before Britain’s snap election. And Qatar’s neighbors in the Gulf turn unexpectedly hostile.

These and more of the week’s top international news stories are on the Friday News Roundup.

GUESTS

Andrew Taylor, Professor of political science, North Carolina State University

Bruce Lawrence, Author, “The Koran in English: A Biography”; professor emeritus of Religion, Duke University

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jun 9, 2017

The testimony of fired FBI Director James Comey to the Senate Intelligence Committee dominated the news this week, even before it happened.

Some cities had watch parties. Plenty of others went on with life as normal. And Washington held its breath.

The consequences of Comey — part of this week’s Friday News Roundup in front of a live audience in Chapel Hill, N.C.

GUESTS

1A Movie Club Sees 'Wonder Woman'

Jun 8, 2017

There had been concerns about the new Wonder Woman movie. Apart from the usual grumbles about casting from corners of the internet, critics and fans saw little to look forward to in the latest film in a series that included “Batman v. Superman” and “Suicide Squad,” which reviewers declared “tiresome, ill-tempered…dismal” and “by no means good,” respectively.

According to the latest Pew Research data, college graduation rates are up for Americans in nearly every racial and ethnic group.

Last year, former President Barack Obama spoke about how crucial this is for the U.S. economy.

How Alan Alda Makes Science Understandable

Jun 7, 2017

Have you ever struggled with getting a basic point across to a friend or colleague? Communication isn’t simple, especially when you’re trying to express complex ideas.

Alan Alda, the actor, New York Times best-selling author and longtime host of of PBS’ “Scientific American Frontiers” has spent hours trying to bridge the communications gap with scientists, physicists, neuroscientists and academics.

In a shocking and deadly assault, attackers stormed Iran’s parliament and the shrine of revolutionary founder Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini Wednesday.

The Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attacks, which the BBC calls “the most serious terrorist violence in Tehran since the turbulent early years after the 1979 Islamic Revolution.”

Can The Nation's Voting System Be Trusted?

Jun 7, 2017

New evidence that suggests the Russians hacked further into our voting system than we thought has many voters asking how we can best protect a system that delivers the peaceful transfer of power.

A look at the electoral process and how vulnerable it is to an outside attack.

GUESTS

Friday News Roundup - International

Jun 2, 2017

Afghanistan’s president says cowards were behind this week’s bombing in Kabul. After their latest meeting, Germany’s Chancellor calls out President Trump. And of course, the President makes his decision on the Paris climate accord. A panel of journalists joins Joshua Johnson for analysis of the week’s top international news stories.

GUESTS

Susan Glasser, Chief international affairs columnist, Politico

Eli Lake, Columnist, Bloomberg View

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

Jun 2, 2017

Paris deals, Jared’s secret channels and a spate of worrying hate crimes seen across the country. Plus, the ongoing mystery that surrounds covfefe. A panel of journalists joins Joshua Johnson for analysis of the week’s top national news stories.

GUESTS

Ed O’Keefe, Congressional correspondent, The Washington Post

Nia-Malika Henderson, Senior political reporter, CNN

Reid Wilson, National correspondent, The Hill

The Roe v. Wade decision of 1973 by no means settled the controversy over a woman’s right to an abortion. It remains a hot political topic today — and some new voices have emerged in the contemporary debate.

Dr. Willie Parker, an abortion rights advocate — and outspoken Christian — not only provides abortions, he also offers new insight and perspective on access to the procedure. Opponents of his view are heartened by federal legislation that allows states to restrict funding for abortion providers like Planned Parenthood.

Is Missile Defense Our Best Defense?

Jun 1, 2017

This week, the Pentagon successfully tested and shot down an intercontinental ballistic missile target. The move is widely seen as a test of the Pentagon’s ability to counter a North Korean missile launch.

But how exactly does the US’s missile defense system work? And can we trust it when we need it the most? When lives are on the line?

GUESTS

Don’t call it a comeback. Game shows have been around on television pretty much forever. But more modern ones like “The Bachelor” or “American Ninja Warrior” don’t seem to have suppressed the appetite for tradition.

This summer, some of the old school game shows are getting reboots. From “Love Connection” to “The Gong Show” to “The Joker’s Wild,” what does the return to traditional game shows say about today’s TV viewers?

GUESTS

Eric Deggans, TV critic, NPR

Call Me: Why Backchannels Matter

May 31, 2017

Backchannels, or secret lines of communication, are often used by the White House as diplomatic tools. But they’re also a way around intelligence agencies, which raises questions about why White House adviser (and President Trump’s son-in-law) Jared Kushner attempted to create a backchannel with Russia before Trump transitioned into office. Trump himself has also reportedly offered up his personal cell phone number to world leaders. What are the national security concerns around private communications with other countries?

GUESTS

Why 'Jeopardy!' Wants...You!

May 31, 2017

The game show “Jeopardy!” has been a staple of American television for more than five decades. The program, which has been hosted by Alex Trebek since 1984, continues to pull in great ratings. But “Jeopardy!” still heavily recruits contestants, despite a large pool of people always eager to compete. Who is “Jeopardy!” searching for to take the show into another decade of success?


Even some of our staff would love to be contestants on “Jeopardy!” But they know it takes more than smarts to make the show.  This is how they train.

President Donald Trump says the world must confront extremists or, in his words, “drive them out.”

After the attack in Manchester, England, can we stop extreme ideologies, or do we need to rethink what’s possible?

GUESTS

Peter Bergen, CNN’s national security analyst; vice president and director of the international security program at New America; author of “United States of Jihad: Investigating America’s Homegrown Terrorists.”

What's the Consensus on Consent?

May 23, 2017

A recent paper from the Columbia Journal of Gender and Law on the nonconsensual removal of condoms — called stealthing — has pushed discussions on consent further into the national conversation. Saying yes or no to a sexual advance should be straightforward. How do we clarify the rules on sexual consent?

GUESTS

The Latest On The Manchester Bombing

May 23, 2017

Police say they have determined the name of the attacker behind the bombing an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England. They have not yet released the name, and are attempting to determine whether the bomber had outside assistance. One arrest has been made.

GUESTS

Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer, public policy, Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and co-author of “Protecting Liberty in an Age of Terror”

Special Counsel. So What? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

May 23, 2017

The appointment of a special counsel to investigate President Trump’s ties to Russia seemed to elicit a bipartisan sigh of relief. Former FBI Director Robert Mueller will lead the independent inquiry, even as the congressional probe continues. Mueller’s involvement could bring much needed answers about Russia to the forefront, but it could complicate things, too.

We’ll take your questions about the special counsel, Mueller and where the investigation goes from here.

GUESTS

Carrie Johnson, Justice correspondent, NPR

Choosing the right words can be the difference between life and death, says Sir Harold Evans.

Evans, a legendary editor knighted by the Queen of England for his service to journalism, spent a lifetime pouring over documents. He’s corrected files from reporters on the battlefield, memos by past U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and now, Evans is out with a new book that celebrates the importance of clear writing. It’s called, “Do I Make Myself Clear: Why Writing Well Matters.”

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

May 19, 2017

It’s been another leaky week as concerns mount over secrets shared and confidences broken.

On this week’s Roundup of top national news stories, find out who’s been saying what and who’s been saying too much.

GUESTS

Byron York, Chief political correspondent, The Washington Examiner

Julia Ioffe, Staff writer, The Atlantic

Naftali Bendavid, Editor and reporter, The Wall Street Journal

Friday News Roundup - International

May 19, 2017

Turkey’s president comes to Washington, but it’s his bodyguards who leave a mark. Vladimir Putin says he can prove President Trump did not give secrets to Russia. And it’s a pilgrimage of sorts as Donald Trump prepares to visit Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican.

GUESTS

Edward Luce, Chief U.S. columnist and commentator, Financial Times; his latest book is “The Retreat of Western Liberalism”

Elise Labott, Global affairs correspondent, CNN

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