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BBC News reaches about 40 million adults in the UK every week - its international services are consumed by an additional 239 million adults around the world. Material is brought into the BBC by its newsgathering staff of more than 8,500, with more than 40 international bureaus and seven in the UK. BBC News is one of the largest operations of its kind in the world.

President Donald Trump says the world must confront extremists or, in his words, “drive them out.”

After the attack in Manchester, England, can we stop extreme ideologies, or do we need to rethink what’s possible?

GUESTS

Peter Bergen, CNN’s national security analyst; vice president and director of the international security program at New America; author of “United States of Jihad: Investigating America’s Homegrown Terrorists.”

What's the Consensus on Consent?

May 23, 2017

A recent paper from the Columbia Journal of Gender and Law on the nonconsensual removal of condoms — called stealthing — has pushed discussions on consent further into the national conversation. Saying yes or no to a sexual advance should be straightforward. How do we clarify the rules on sexual consent?

GUESTS

The Latest On The Manchester Bombing

May 23, 2017

Police say they have determined the name of the attacker behind the bombing an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester, England. They have not yet released the name, and are attempting to determine whether the bomber had outside assistance. One arrest has been made.

GUESTS

Juliette Kayyem, Lecturer, public policy, Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government and co-author of “Protecting Liberty in an Age of Terror”

Special Counsel. So What? ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

May 23, 2017

The appointment of a special counsel to investigate President Trump’s ties to Russia seemed to elicit a bipartisan sigh of relief. Former FBI Director Robert Mueller will lead the independent inquiry, even as the congressional probe continues. Mueller’s involvement could bring much needed answers about Russia to the forefront, but it could complicate things, too.

We’ll take your questions about the special counsel, Mueller and where the investigation goes from here.

GUESTS

Carrie Johnson, Justice correspondent, NPR

Choosing the right words can be the difference between life and death, says Sir Harold Evans.

Evans, a legendary editor knighted by the Queen of England for his service to journalism, spent a lifetime pouring over documents. He’s corrected files from reporters on the battlefield, memos by past U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and now, Evans is out with a new book that celebrates the importance of clear writing. It’s called, “Do I Make Myself Clear: Why Writing Well Matters.”

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

May 19, 2017

It’s been another leaky week as concerns mount over secrets shared and confidences broken.

On this week’s Roundup of top national news stories, find out who’s been saying what and who’s been saying too much.

GUESTS

Byron York, Chief political correspondent, The Washington Examiner

Julia Ioffe, Staff writer, The Atlantic

Naftali Bendavid, Editor and reporter, The Wall Street Journal

Friday News Roundup - International

May 19, 2017

Turkey’s president comes to Washington, but it’s his bodyguards who leave a mark. Vladimir Putin says he can prove President Trump did not give secrets to Russia. And it’s a pilgrimage of sorts as Donald Trump prepares to visit Saudi Arabia, Israel and the Vatican.

GUESTS

Edward Luce, Chief U.S. columnist and commentator, Financial Times; his latest book is “The Retreat of Western Liberalism”

Elise Labott, Global affairs correspondent, CNN

NBA legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar on his 50-year relationship with his coach John Wooden, how he shaped his life and career. A conversation about friendship and personal tragedy, the importance of mentoring young athletes, and confronting racism in sports.

Guests

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Basketball Hall of Famer; author, “Coach Wooden And Me”

© 2017 WAMU 88.5 – American University Radio.

It seems the malicious software known as WannaCry — which was unleashed on hospitals, individuals and a host of others last week — originated as an NSA tool that exploited a flaw in older Windows software.

Now Microsoft is calling out the NSA for “stockpiling” exploits like this.

President Trump's Big Reveal

May 16, 2017

News broke Monday afternoon that “President Trump revealed highly classified information to the Russian foreign minister and ambassador” while the three met last week in the White House, according to sources close to the matter.

What's The White House's Word Worth?

May 15, 2017

When the White House says something, America and the world take note. But the president says that with so much going on, we can’t expect his spokespeople to be on the same page. Whom then do we believe? And can the White House close the credibility gap?

Guests

Jen Psaki, former White House communications director and State Department spokesperson under President Obama

Friday News Roundup - International

May 12, 2017

With guest host John Donvan.

France and South Korea have new presidents. And Russia’s president? He’s been making time for some ice hockey. On the international edition of the Friday News Round Up, a panel of journalists joins guest host John Donvan to talk about those stories and more.

Guests

Yochi Dreazen, foreign editor of Vox; author, “The Invisible Front.”

Karen DeYoung, senior national security correspondent, The Washington Post

Jon Sopel, North America editor, BBC

Friday News Roundup - Domestic

May 12, 2017

With guest host John Donvan.

The controversial firing of FBI Director James Comey dominated the news this week. Guest host John Donvan and a panel of journalists discuss that and other happenings around the U.S., including the Texas governor’s ban on sanctuary cities and how Shaquille O’Neal might do as a sheriff.

Guests

Susan Davis, congressional correspondent, NPR

David Leonhardt, op-ed columnist, The New York Times; former editor, The Upshot, a New York Times website covering politics and policy