remote learning

Students outside of State College Area High School on Jan. 8, 2018.
Min Xian / WPSU

 

The State Senate approved a bill Wednesday that would allow parents to choose to have their children repeat a grade level because of learning loss due to COVID-19 for the upcoming school year. 

The decision on whether a student should repeat a year is currently made by schools and teachers. 

Broadcast Journalism student Anan Hussein was the only in-person student for Photojournalism with Professor Will Yurman on October 8, 2020. The rest of the class attended on Zoom. On some occasions, none of the class's 13 students were in person.
Will Yurman

 

In July, Penn State president Eric Barron announced that nearly half of the university’s classes this fall would have some in-person component. But since the start of the semester, attendance for some of those in-person classes has dropped substantially. 

 

Bryan Peasley and his mom, Debbie at a Penn State football game.
Debbie Peasley

 

  The State College Area School District will be offering three different forms of learning to its students for the coming fall semester. Families have until Tuesday to decide what form of education works for them amid the COVID-19 pandemic. 

Sixth grader Lauren Dawson doing schoolwork at home on a computer.
Mike Dawson

You’ve probably heard stories about what it means to be an adult working from home or out of work. But, what’s it like being a young person out of school? K through 12 students have been at home since March, and WPSU talked with some of those students from central Pennsylvania about what they think of not going to back for the rest of school year and what they’re looking forward to.

Here's some of what they had to say:

My name is Lauren Dawson. I’m in sixth grade, and I go to Mount Nittany Middle School. (Centre County)