Governor Tom Wolf

Matt Rourke / Associated Press

(Harrisburg) -- Democratic state lawmakers are criticizing the Trump Administration over its proposed plan to restrict Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits for certain people.

They say the change amounts to a punishment for the poor. 

Right now, people who receive Temporary Assistance for Needy Families—or TANF—are also considered eligible for SNAP.

But the US Department of Agriculture is proposing limiting that eligibility to people who get at least $50 in TANF benefits per month.

Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman
Min Xian / WPSU

The lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania, John Fetterman, has been crisscrossing the state to hear what people have to say about legalizing recreational marijuana in Pennsylvania. The “listening tour” follows Fetterman’s election as lieutenant governor. Before that, he had begun to serve in his fourth term as mayor of Braddock. Fetterman is known for his unconventional approach to politics, winning his first term as mayor by one vote. WPSU's Anne Danahy spoke with Fetterman about legalizing marijuana, Gov.

Panelists discussed potential solutions to the rural broadband crisis as a part of the Influencers Project hosted by the Centre Daily Times at the State Theatre on April 24, 2019.
Min Xian / WPSU

A variety of potential solutions exist to address the widespread lack of broadband internet access, such as community cooperatives and “white space” technology, which delivers internet similar to that of 4G, according to 14 panelists who participated in discussions of the rural broadband crisis on Wednesday. The “Influencers Project” was hosted by the Centre Daily Times at the State Theatre in downtown State College.

Matt Rourke / Associated Press

HARRISBURG (AP) — Gov. Tom Wolf rolled out a second-term proposal Wednesday to vault Pennsylvania's minimum wage to one of the highest in the nation after similar first-term proposals by the Democrat fell flat in the Republican-controlled Legislature.
Wolf wants to take the hourly minimum to $12 this year, putting Pennsylvania in line with the highest state minimum wages, according to federal data. Pennsylvania also would join a handful of states by eliminating its tipped wage minimum, now $2.83, under legislation being introduced with Wolf's support.

Wanting To Get Things Done, Wolf Prepares For Second Term

Dec 31, 2018
AP / Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Gov. Tom Wolf, who introduced himself at his first inauguration as an unconventional governor and then unveiled an ambitious blueprint to transform Pennsylvania's tax structure, is returning for a second term with big plans, although with perhaps a more sober view of what is possible.
Wolf, a Democrat, faced huge Republican legislative majorities throughout his first term, and will again face substantial Republican majorities as he hopes to nail down second-term achievements, including on stalled first-term priorities.

Matt Rourke / Associated Press

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Gov. Tom Wolf's administration is settling a vote-counting lawsuit stemming from the 2016 presidential election, in part by affirming a commitment it made previously to push Pennsylvania's counties to buy voting systems that leave a verifiable paper trail by 2020.
Paperwork filed Thursday in federal court in Philadelphia caps a lawsuit that Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein filed in 2016 as she sought recounts in Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Michigan.

olf and Fetterman, soon after the primary election that made the Braddock mayor the Democratic candidate for lieutenant governor.
Dawn J. Sagert / York Daily Record

When a new legislative session starts in January, embattled lieutenant governor Mike Stack, who lost the Democratic primary, is exiting the Capitol.

Stack's also leaving his state-provided residence. But his replacement, John Fetterman, isn't moving in.

That decision might save the commonwealth a little money. But what's even more important to the new lieutenant governor is how it looks politically.

This combination of October 2017 file photos shows Pennsylvania gubernatorial candidates Democrat Gov. Tom Wolf, (left), and Republican Scott Wagner.
(Matt Rourke/AP Photo, file)

With under a month until the general election, Democratic Governor Tom Wolf and his Republican challenger Scott Wagner appear to be locked in an uneven contest.

Their latest financial disclosures show Wolf with $8.9 million on hand to Wagner’s $1.8 million. The incumbent is also leading by almost 17 points in an average of recent independent polls.

And the candidates’ divergent campaign styles are reflecting that divide.

Photo: AP (Chris Pizzello/Invision/File Photo)

HERSHEY, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania's Democratic governor and his Republican challenger are about to face off in what will be the fall race's only formal debate-style forum.
Gov. Tom Wolf and GOP nominee Scott Wagner are scheduled to take the stage Monday night in Hershey at the event moderated by "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek.
Wagner wants more debates, but Wolf is leading in polls and fundraising and has agreed to take part in just one head-to-head encounter.

Wolf Says 'No' To All But One Debate In Governor's Race

Aug 23, 2018
Photo: AP

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf is agreeing to participate in just one debate before the Nov. 6 election with his Republican rival Scott Wagner, an event to be moderated by "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek.
Wolf's campaign said this week that will be his only debate, and gave no explanation as to why. That prompted Wagner's campaign to accuse Wolf of being "afraid to defend himself in front of Pennsylvanians."

Gov. Tom Wolf
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Governor Tom Wolf is saying he thinks more can be done to cut down on marijuana arrests in Pennsylvania.

In an interview on WITF’s Smart Talk, Wolf said in some municipalities, decriminalization is already underway. He noted that prosecutors are using their discretion to downgrade punishments for possession of small amounts of marijuana.

However, the governor said more “systematic” action still needs to be taken.

PA Budget Passes After Fast-track Negotiation

Jul 14, 2016
Lawmakers with paperwork
Marc Levy / AP Photo

After two days with an underfunded state budget, lawmakers have approved a revenue plan to balance the $31.5 billion spending bill.

 

Governor Tom Wolf has signed it Wednesday evening, putting an end to the 2016/17 budget process.

 

Wolf said the action saved the commonwealth from a repeat of last year’s budget debacle.

 

“Today’s passage of a revenue package means we avoid another lengthy impasse,” he said in an official statement. “Our budget is balanced this year, and we have greatly reduced the budget’s structural deficit.”

 

School building
Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

Pennsylvania will soon join the overwhelming majority of states that have a student-based formula for distributing state education funds.

Both the House passed the measure with a large majority Wednesday. The Senate did so last week.

For much of the past 25 years, the state has largely divided it's main pot of education money based on the principle that districts should never get less than the prior year.

Mary Wilson

Nearly nine months into the fiscal year, Pennsylvania's budget impasse will end -- or nearly end -- this week. 

Governor Tom Wolf, facing pressure from state-funded programs and fellow Democrats, said Wednesday he'll allow a roughly $6 billion supplemental funding plan to become law, but without his signature. 

"I cannot in good conscience sign this bill," said Wolf, speaking from a podium next to his office in the Capitol. "I cannot in good conscience attach my name to a budget that simply doesn't add up."

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf and his wife, Frances
Marc Levy / AP Photo

Governor Tom Wolf says he has been diagnosed with a “mild” case of prostate cancer and will undergo treatment beginning in the next two weeks.

The governor says a routine checkup last fall gave him the first indication of cancer, and follow-up tests afterward confirmed it.

He wouldn’t detail the extent of the cancer, nor the treatment he’ll receive for it, but he says he won’t need chemotherapy. He doesn’t expect his treatment to interfere with his duties as governor.

Gov. Tom Wolf
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

  

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf says the state will continue its plans to cut carbon emissions. That's despite a surprise move by the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday that put a hold on Obama's initiative to force states to cut greenhouse gas emissions. 

Pennsylvania has been on target to comply with the federal Clean Power Plan, and its target of reducing emissions 32 percent by 2030.

In the meantime, 27 other states opposed to the plan have challenged it in court. The Supreme Court has halted any further implementation of the plan until the court battle is over.

Gov. Tom Wolf giving budget address to full room.
Chris Knight / AP Photo

Democratic Governor Tom Wolf offered up some tough talk for the GOP-controlled state Legislature in his second budget address, scarcely mentioning the details of his proposed $33.3 billion plan.

“Usually this speech is an opportunity to lay out an ambitious agenda for the year ahead,” Wolf said. “But I can’t give that speech. Not under these circumstances.”

Wolf’s proposal calls for $2.7 billion in new and higher taxes to close a budget gap and funnel more money into education, human services, and mandated spending.

Gov. Tom Wolf Unveils 2016-17 Budget Proposal

Feb 9, 2016
Gov. Tom Wolf, with Rep. Mike Turzai, R-Allegheny and Lt. Gov. Mike Stack behind him.
Chris Knight / AP Photo

Gov. Tom Wolf warned lawmakers on Tuesday that Pennsylvania's finances are a ticking time bomb amid a record-long budget gridlock, sending them a spending proposal for the coming fiscal year with no full plan in place for the fiscal year that began back in July.

This past August, President Obama announced his Clean Power Plan. It’s the first-ever national standards to limit carbon pollution from power plants, the largest source of carbon emissions in the U.S. What does this mean for Pennsylvania?  What role will the public play in crafting PA’s plan?   DEP’s Secretary John Quigley is our guest.