race

Claudia Sherrod (left) and Haley Dervinis (right) both live in Point Breeze. Although Dervinis is a newcomer, she's also wary of the rapid change.
Emma Lee / WHYY

Debbie Bell knows what it is to be made to feel like an afterthought.

She’s a lifelong resident of Point Breeze, a historically low-income African-American neighborhood in South Philadelphia that’s seen a lot of change lately.

To hear longtime neighbors like Bell tell it, Point Breeze used to be about pride. It was mothers cooking collard greens. People pulling together to help each other make the rent when times got hard. It was friendly competitions to see who had the tidiest block.

It was about community.

Have attitudes about race and inequality changed for the better? We'll ask our guest, William Darity Jr., the Samuel Dubois Cook professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics at Duke University.  He's also the founding director of the Research Network on Racial and Ethnic Inequality at Duke and served as director of Graduate Studies at the University of North Carolina.