Gov. Tom Wolf

Matt DiSanto / WPSU

Governor Tom Wolf visited Penn State Monday to celebrate Pennsylvania’s new law allowing college athletes to get paid for endorsements and sponsorships.

High up in Beaver Stadium’s club level, Wolf recognized legislation that lets student-athletes profit from the use of their name, image, and likeness – better known as NIL. Wolf said the new policy will help athletes finally earn their fair share.

Penn State football coach James Franklin speaks to reporters about the importance of COVID-19 vaccines. Penn State president Eric Barron, freshman football player Theo Johnson and Governor Tom Wolf (seated, L to R) also spoke at the event.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Governor Tom Wolf, Penn State President Eric Barron and Nittany Lions football coach James Franklin spoke together at the Pegula Ice Arena Wednesday, encouraging students to get vaccinated for COVID-19 before they leave for the summer. 

“Right now I know that this is maybe not something that is top of mind. Finals coming up, moving back home, finding summer jobs,” Wolf said. “But now that college students are eligible to get vaccinated, it is really important to make this a priority.” 

 

Gov. Tom Wolf speaks at a COVID-19 vaccination site setup at the Berks County Intermediate Unit in Reading, Pa., Monday, March 15, 2021.
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Pennsylvania says it is lifting all COVID-19 restrictions — except an order to wear a mask while in public — on Memorial Day.

Capacity restrictions on bars, restaurants and indoor and outdoor gatherings will go away on May 31, more than a year into the pandemic.

Acting Health Secretary Alison Beam said in a news release Tuesday that Pennsylvania is making “significant progress” in the fight against COVID-19 and more people are getting vaccinated.

State Senate Majority Leader Kim Ward (R-Westmoreland) pitches voters on voting up a pair of constitutional amendments that would limit the governor's future emergency powers on Apr. 20, 2021.
Sam Dunklau / WITF

 

(Harrisburg) — Voters in the May 18 primary will get to weigh in on two ideas to change how different branches of state government could exercise their powers during an emergency.

Both of them would amend Pennsylvania’s constitution. One would limit a governor’s disaster proclamations to three weeks at a time, while another would make it easier for state lawmakers to vote them down.

Pennsylvania: All Adults Eligible For Vaccine On Tuesday

Apr 12, 2021
Gov. Tom Wolf speaks at a COVID-19 vaccination site setup at the Berks County Intermediate Unit in Reading, Pa., Monday, March 15, 2021.
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania will expand eligibility for the COVID-19 vaccine to all adults beginning Tuesday, nearly a week ahead of schedule. 

State health officials said Monday that the quicker rollout was enabled by “ongoing appointment availability” in many parts of the state. 

Gov. Tom Wolf says the accelerated timetable is necessary to keep up with increase coronavirus case counts and hospitalizations. Most states have already made adults universally eligible for the vaccine. 

Gov. Tom Wolf looks at a vial of the Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccine at a vaccination site setup for teachers and school staff at the Berks County Intermediate Unit in Reading, Pa., Monday, March 15, 2021.
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

Gov. Tom Wolf's administration says every adult in Pennsylvania will qualify for COVID-19 vaccines starting April 19.

Starting immediately, vaccine appointments are being expanded to include police, corrections officers and other law enforcement; volunteer and professional firefighters; grocery employees; and food and farm workers.

Acting Health Secretary Alison Beam said Wednesday the new timeline is possible because the state’s rate of vaccinations has quickened.

In this file photo from summer 2020, a sign in front of the Mount Nittany Medical Center asks visitors to see a staff member if they have COVID-19 symptoms.
Min Xian / WPSU

The number of reported COVID-19 cases in Centre County increased by 302 Friday, setting a single-day record, but the state said an oversight in reporting may be a factor in that large jump.

The county now has a total of  7,456 known cases. The previous largest single-day increase was 212 cases on Sept. 15. After that, the rise in cases in Centre County had slowed down.

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf
Julio Cortez / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) — With daily cases near an all-time high and hospitals pushed to capacity, Pennsylvania is under new orders to slow the spread of the coronavirus.

Gov. Tom Wolf announced the updated public health mandates during an online news conference Thursday afternoon.

“The measures I’m announcing today are intended to be temporary,” Wolf said. The new measures take effect Saturday and continue through Jan. 4. “For the next three weeks, please, I ask all my fellow Pennsylvanians to stand with me against COVID.”

New measures include:

Julio Cortez / AP Photo

Pennsylvania Democratic Governor Tom Wolf says he’s tested positive for COVID-19.

This graphic from Gov. Tom Wolf outlines the phases of reopening.
Gov. Tom Wolf

Eighteen Pennsylvania counties moved Friday into the green phase of Governor Tom Wolf’s reopening plan. Those counties include Centre, Cameron, Clearfield, Elk, Forest and McKean.

In the green phase, Wolf says personal care services such as hair salons and barber shops can reopen with appointments. Appointments are encouraged for gyms and spas. 

People outside the courthouse holding signs protesting Gov. Wolfs' stay-at-home orders
Anne Danahy / WPSU

 

Just before Gov. Tom Wolf announced the easing of restrictions on 24 counties in the northwest and northcentral parts of Pennsylvania, a crowd gathered at the county courthouse in Hollidaysburg for a “ReOpen PA Rally."

 

Attorney Marc Scaringi headlined the event, held by the Blair County Tea Party Friday.

 

A health care worker stands near a rally organized by opponents of Gov. Tom Wolf's strict coronavirus mitigation efforts.
Joseph Darius Jaafari / PA Post

Armed with nothing but signs and science, half a dozen medical workers from across the state showed up near the capitol in Harrisburg on Monday to counter the message of hundreds of “ReOpen PA” protesters calling for an end to coronavirus restrictions.

The small group of health care workers told people participating in the larger rally to go home to keep their loved ones safe. But they made their point from a distance.

Gov. Tom Wolf extended the stay-at-home order to the entire state on April 1, 2020.
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is one seven states in the northeast that announced Monday they'll be working together to come up with a plan to reopen their economies once the spread of COVID-19 is under control.

The announcement came during a joint telephone conference, led by New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo. President Trump tweeted earlier in the day that it is up to him, not the governors, when to reopen the states.

But, when asked about that, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf referred to how state closures have been happening.

State Senate President Pro Tempore Jake Corman sitting in the WPSU radio studio
Min Xian / WPSU

State Senator Jake Corman fielded questions on COVID-19 during a telephone town hall Wednesday, pushing back on parts of Gov. Tom Wolf’s response to the pandemic.

Wolf signed an order Wednesday allowing the state to transfer personal protective equipment and other medical supplies from one health care provider to another that needs them.

 

“This will allow us to move key equipment, like personal protective equipment and ventilators to high population, high impact areas," Wolf said.

 

Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf Orders Statewide Shutdown Over Coronavirus

Mar 16, 2020
Gov. Tom Wolf speaks at a press conference in Harrisburg about the arrival of coronavirus in Pennsylvania on Friday, March 6, 2020. At rear is state Health Secretary Rachel Levine.
COMMONWEALTH MEDIA SERVICES

 

Spotlight PA is an independent, nonpartisan newsroom powered by The Philadelphia Inquirer in partnership with the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and PennLive/Patriot-News. Sign up for our free weekly newsletter.

HARRISBURG — Gov. Tom Wolf on Monday ordered a statewide shutdown as the number of coronavirus cases in Pennsylvania continued to grow.

Gov. Tom Wolf speaks at a press conference in Harrisburg about the arrival of coronavirus in Pennsylvania on Friday, March 6, 2020. At rear is state Health Secretary Rachel Levine.
Commonwealth Media Services

Editor’s note: This story was updated with details from the governor’s 2 p.m. press conference.

(Harrisburg) — Gov. Tom Wolf has announced that beginning Friday, the state will begin social distancing measures in response to the spread of the coronavirus. This plan is slated to last for 14 days, but will be continually evaluated.

“We’ve watched as other states, we’ve watched as other countries have struggled to control this coronavirus,” Gov. Wolf said, “and we’ve learned a lot from their efforts.”

State Senate President Pro Tempore Jake Corman sitting in the WPSU radio studio
Min Xian / WPSU

WPSU's Anne Danahy spoke with state Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman about issues ranging from recreational marijuana to the prospects of raising Pennsylvania's minimum wage. Corman represents the 34th district, which includes Centre, Mifflin and Juniata counties and parts of Huntingdon County. He has served in the Senate since 1999, and won reelection last year. In 2014, Corman became Senate majority leader, making him second in command in the Senate.

Lt. Gov. John Fetterman
Anne Danahy / WPSU

Pennsylvania Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman was in DuBois Thursday night as part of his statewide listening tour on legalizing recreational marijuana. Most of the people who spoke at the event support legalization.

“All I want to do is have a little puff," a retired school teacher told Fetterman to applause from the crowd.

The former teacher said he’d like to be able to smoke marijuana without worrying about getting into trouble. He was one of about two dozen people who spoke in favor of legalizing recreational marijuana.

Two Centre County commissioners talk with Gov. Tom Wolf
Anne Danahy / WPSU

Pennsylvania Governor Tom Wolf announced Wednesday the state is going to build the stretch of U.S. Route 322 in Centre County known as the missing link. The project will cost $670 million dollars and will, Wolf said, make “the long-awaited route connection a reality.”

“As they say, a journey of a thousand miles starts with a single step and that’s what we’re doing here,” Wolf said while making the announcement in a hotel outside of State College where the current two-lane highway runs.

Wolf Makes 2-Day Visit to Hurricane-Ravaged Puerto Rico

Aug 28, 2018
Photo: AP

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Pennsylvania's governor is heading to Puerto Rico to examine damage from last year's Hurricane Maria and to develop cultural and business ties.
Gov. Tom Wolf is paying his own airfare and accommodations for the two-day trip that will end Friday morning.
Pennsylvania is home to more than 350,000 people who are from Puerto Rico or descendants of Puerto Ricans. The state has hosted people displaced by Maria.

In this Tuesday, Jan. 2, 2018 photo, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf speaks during an interview with The Associated Press at his office in Harrisburg, Pa.
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- Governor Tom Wolf has rejected a Republican-drawn congressional map designed to replace the one the state Supreme Court declared unconstitutional late last month. 

The Democratic administration says the map is still too partisan--though House and Senate Republicans maintain it follows the court's order exactly.