Health Minute

Tuesdays at 7:31 a.m. & 4:32 p.m.

Health Minute is a weekly, one-minute radio and digital program featuring information and strategies for living a healthy life. 

Health Minute takes a holistic approach to the definition of “health” including physical, emotional and mental health and wellness. It also addresses health and wellness across a person’s entire lifespan.

A collaboration between WPSU and the Penn State College of Nursing, the program draws on the knowledge of local educators and health professionals to share information that affects the daily lives of the people in our communities.  

Production support for Health Minute is made possible by Dr. Carline Crevecoeur and Dr. Michael Feffer

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Spring is the perfect time to enjoy a fun road trip, but safe driving is serious business.

According to the U.S. Department of Transportation, distracted driving causes thousands of crashes each year, including up to 58% of teen crashes. In 2016, over 37,000 lives were lost on U.S. roads.

Here’s what you can do to practice safe driving:

TRANSCRIPT:  

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

May is Mental Health Month. According to the World Health Organization, mental health is a state of well-being in which an individual can recognize their own abilities, cope with the normal stresses of life, work productively, and contribute to their community.

Mental and physical health influence each other and are essential to overall wellness. Here are some steps you can take to promote a mentally healthy lifestyle:

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. One in six American women has experienced an attempted or completed rape. Trauma from sexual violence left untreated has long-term health consequences.

Fortunately, Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners have special training in evidence collection and working with patients who have experienced trauma, and the SAFE-T Center at Penn State provides support for sexual assault care in underserved communities through telehealth.

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

It’s important to take care of your mental health and manage stress during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Symptoms of stress include fear, worry, changes in appetite or sleep, worsening of chronic health conditions, or increased use of alcohol or other substances. 

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The past few weeks have been challenging as we continue to take precautions to slow and prevent the spread of coronavirus.

Here are some tips to help you stay connected to your family, friends, and community:

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

COVID-19 requires all of us to take precautions through “social distancing.” Social distancing means staying physically separated from other people by at least 6 feet or 2 meters.

While it's still acceptable to exercise outdoors, it's important to find outdoor spaces that aren't crowded with other people. It's also important to avoid large gatherings and to avoid traveling by public transit.

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

As Covid-19 continues to spread, what are you doing  to boost your immune system? 

The National Sleep Foundation explains that when we don’t get enough sleep, our immune system is weakened and we become more susceptible to infections. Chronic sleep loss does further damage by increasing our risk for obesity, diabetes, and heart disease. 

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Handwashing continues to be an important way to prevent the spread of coronavirus and other respiratory illnesses.

The steps for effective handwashing include: 

Wet your hands with warm or cold water, turn water off, and apply soap to your hands.

Lather the soap by rubbing your hands together to include the front and back of hands and fingers.

Scrub hands and fingers for at least 20 seconds.

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Healthy living includes healthy eating. Making nutritious food choices can help you stay strong and maintain the energy you need to live a full life. Here are some tips for making better food choices when cooking at home or eating out.

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Arthritis affects one out of every four adults and more than 300,000 children.

Arthritis is not just one disease. It is a collection of numerous conditions that involve joint pain or joint disease.

People with arthritis can take the following steps to help manage their condition: 

TRANSCRIPT:

You're listening to WPSU's Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State's College of Nursing.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. The median age for a diagnosis is 66, but cancer can develop at any age. Information and education are key to prevention and early detection.

How can you reduce your risk of cancer?

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

Go Red for Women is a national movement sponsored by the American Heart Association to end heart disease in women.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention states that heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States.

Risk factors for heart disease include smoking, high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and diabetes.

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

February is American Heart Month. In the United States, someone dies from cardiovascular disease every 38 seconds.  

What can you do to keep your heart healthy?

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

February 14th is National Donor Day. 95% of U.S. adults support organ donation, but only 58% are signed up as donors, which has resulted in an organ transplant shortage.

Anyone, regardless of age or medical history, can sign up to be a donor.

One donor can donate up to eight lifesaving organs, including a heart, liver, pancreas, 2 lungs, 2 kidneys, and intestines.

You're listening to WPSU's Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State's College of Nursing.

February is Children's Dental Health Month.

Oral care begins even before your baby's first tooth emerges. Baby's gums should be cleaned twice daily with a moist, clean cloth to rid the gums of bacteria and sugars. The American Dental Association warns tooth decay can occur when babies are exposed to sugary drinks, put to bed with a bottle, or using shared utensils. Fluoride toothpaste can be used once the child is two years old.

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

The new coronavirus, which has sickened thousands and killed more than 80 people in Wuhan, China, has now been confirmed in the United States. It can cause fever, severe illness, and pneumonia. 

The CDC does not expect a large outbreak in the U.S., but they’re monitoring everyone who recently visited the now quarantined Wuhan region. 

Health Minute: Winter Sports

Jan 21, 2020

TRANSCRIPT:

You're listening to WPSU's Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State's College of Nursing.

If you're planning to hit the slopes, lace up the ice skates, or go sledding, here are some tips for staying safe:

Health Minute: Glaucoma

Jan 14, 2020

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing. 

Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases that causes increased eye pressure, which can result in damage to the optic nerve, vision loss and even blindness.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says anyone can get glaucoma, but the risk is higher for people with a family history of the disease, African Americans over the age of 40, and people over 60. 

TRANSCRIPT:

You’re listening to WPSU’s Health Minute, a collaboration with Penn State’s College of Nursing.

As you participate in your favorite outdoor activities this winter, remember to protect yourself from cold weather related injuries. 

Normal body temperature is around 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit. Decreases in body temperature can put your body at risk.

The National Weather Service and Department of Homeland Security recommend some simple measures you can take to reduce your risk of injury this winter.

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