UAW Goes On Strike Against General Motors

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET Monday
The United Auto Workers began a nationwide strike just before midnight on Sunday at General Motors after both sides failed to agree on a new contract over issues including wages, health care and profit-sharing. Production across the U.S. is expected to be halted, affecting nearly 50,000 worker at 33 manufacturing plants in nine states as well as 22 parts distribution warehouses until a new contract is hammered out. "At midnight tonight, the picket lines...

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This I Believe: I Believe In Making The Bed

Dec 24, 2009

When I was growing up, I fought constantly with my parents over making my bed in the morning. An after-breakfast check-in was routine at my house. My mom or dad would walk down the hall, check each room, and call from upstairs, "Stop whatever it is you're doing and come make your bed." It was a chore that I simply did NOT like, and so I avoided it. I thought it was absurd to make my bed every morning. It was counterproductive. What could be the benefit of straightening a bed in the morning that would inevitably be undone that evening? This puzzled me for a long time.

This I Believe: I Believe In Caring

Dec 10, 2009

Just a few years ago I was a stereotypical teenager. Everything was about "me." I wasn't interested in anyone else or their needs. I often neglected my family because time with my friends seemed more important. Family dinners were a burden and vacations a punishment.

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

This I Believe: I Believe In Public Radio

Apr 2, 2009

For many people, April 15 is TAX DAY! April 15 for me, however, has a different significance…

In 1982, I moved to a small mountain town in Colorado. I thought I’d found the perfect place to live. But there was one thing missing. No public radio. I used to spin the FM dial searching for the voice of the community.  All I would hear was canned music or talk programs packaged somewhere far away and made local only by the commercials injected.

This I Believe: I Believe In Slowing Down

Feb 5, 2009

On a rainy morning when I was ten, my neighbor Mr. Lovett invited me into his home for a woodworking project. Above his fireplace sat an ornate eagle carved by Mr. Lovett himself. Its wingspan was wider than I was tall. I remember wondering how long it took him to make that eagle.

Mr. Lovett guided my block of wood under the scroll saw until it morphed into the rough outline of a duck.

Each year, WPSU holds our "Art for the Airwaves" contest. And our panel of judges selects a winner, whose work is made into a limited edition poster print offered during our fund drive. WPSU's Kristine Allen visited Smethport to talk with this year's winner.  

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New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday he will push for a ban on some e-cigarettes amid a health scare linked to vaping — a move that would follow a similar ban enacted by Michigan and a call from President Trump for a federal prohibition on certain vaping products.

Jennifer Croft is among the most accomplished translators working other languages into English today. She translates Polish, Spanish, and Ukrainian — and is perhaps best known for translating the Polish novelist Olga Tokarczuk's Flights, a genre-straining work for which Croft and Tokarczuk won the 2018 Man Booker International Prize.

Croft's first non-translated work, Homesick, is similarly boundary-pushing, or boundary-expanding. On Homesick's website, Croft notes:

Country music has a gender problem. Women only make up 16% of country artists, and even fewer are songwriters.

When women do break into the mainstream — the likes of Carrie Underwood, Miranda Lambert, and Kacey Musgraves — they're often young. The average age of the genre's top female artists is 29 years old.

Book: 'What Is A Girl Worth?'

9 hours ago

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

By now, you've probably heard about Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. He was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing dozens of girls and young women, all under the guise of providing medical treatment. The first person to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse was former gymnast Rachael Denhollander. She writes about her experience in a new memoir called "What Is A Girl Worth" and a children's book called "How Much Is A Little Girl Worth?"

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

By now, you've probably heard about Larry Nassar, the former doctor for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University. He was sentenced to up to 175 years in prison for sexually abusing dozens of girls and young women, all under the guise of providing medical treatment. The first person to publicly accuse Nassar of sexual abuse was former gymnast Rachael Denhollander. She writes about her experience in a new memoir called "What Is A Girl Worth" and a children's book called "How Much Is A Little Girl Worth?"

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Houthi Drone Strikes Disrupt Almost Half Of Saudi Oil Exports

Updated at 4:51 p.m. ET Yemen's Houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for drone strikes on two Saudi Aramco oil facilities early Saturday, according to a statement by a Houthi spokesman. Reuters and The Wall Street Journal report that about half of the country's oil production has been disrupted, or 5 million barrels a day. Saudi Arabia produces approximately one-tenth of the world's crude oil, but for now, the impact on global oil prices is unknown, as markets are closed for the weekend....

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Judge Blocks Removal Of Confederate Statue That Sparked Charlottesville Protest

A Virginia judge has blocked efforts to remove the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee that was at the center of the deadly violence that erupted in Charlottesville in 2017. In a ruling issued this week, Judge Richard E. Moore said that any effort to remove the Lee statue would violate a state historic preservation statute and issued a permanent injunction preventing its removal. His decision extended to a separate monument to Confederate general Stonewall Jackson that city leaders...

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'We're Tightening Our Belt': Trump's Midwest Support Tested As Farmers Struggle

Farmers in the rural Midwest say they are struggling because of President Trump's ongoing trade war and a recent decision the president made on renewable fuels made from corn and soybeans that benefits the oil industry. "We're tightening our belt," farmer Aaron Lehman says while driving his tractor down a rural road near his farm north of Des Moines, Iowa. "We're talking to our lenders, our landlords [and] our input suppliers." Lehman, the president of the Iowa Farmers Union, says his members...

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Osama Bin Laden's Son Killed In U.S. Counterterrorism Operation, Trump Says

President Trump says that Hamza bin Laden, the son of Osama bin Laden, has been killed in a U.S. counterterrorism operation in the Afghanistan/Pakistan region. In a statement released by the White House on Saturday, Trump said bin Laden's son was responsible for "planning and dealing with various terrorist groups." His death, he said, "not only deprives al-Qa'ida of important leadership skills and the symbolic connection to his father, but undermines important operational activities of the...

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PHOTOS: Vanilla Boom Is Making People Crazy Rich — And Jittery — In Madagascar

80% of the world's vanilla is grown by small holding farmers in the hilly forests of Madagascar. For a generation the price languished below $50 a kilo (about 2.2 pounds) but in 2015 it began to rise at an extraordinary rate and for the past four years has hovered at ten times that amount, between $400 and $600 a kilo. The rise is partly due to increased global demand, partly due to decreased supply, as storms have destroyed many vines, and a lot to do with speculation. Local middle men have...

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Ken Burns Gets To The Heart Of 'Country Music'

Director Ken Burns has told the story of America through the lens of the U.S. Civil War, baseball, jazz and the war in Vietnam. Now, he's telling it again through the soundtrack and the struggle of country music. Country Music, the new documentary film from Burns, airs Sept. 15 on PBS and has more than 16 hours of music history — from Jimmie Rodgers and the Dust Bowl to Dolly Parton , Nashville, Memphis and the heart of America. "This is a music in which you can hear the lyrics and it is...

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'We Don't Want To Die': Women In Turkey Decry Rise In Violence And Killings

Emine Dirican, a beautician from Istanbul, tried to be a good wife. But her husband hated that she worked, that she socialized, even that she wanted to leave the house sometimes without him. She tried to reason with him. He lashed out. "One time, he tied me — my hands, my legs from the back, like you do to animals," recalls Dirican, shuddering. "He beat me with a belt and said, 'You're going to listen to me, you're going to obey whatever I say to you.' " She left him and moved in with her...

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Greta Thunberg To U.S.: 'You Have A Moral Responsibility' On Climate Change

Greta Thunberg led a protest at the White House on Friday. But she wasn't looking to go inside — "I don't want to meet with people who don't accept the science," she says. The young Swedish activist joined a large crowd of protesters who had gathered outside, calling for immediate action to help the environment and reverse an alarming warming trend in average global temperatures. She says her message for President Trump is the same thing she tells other politicians: Listen to science, and...

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Missouri AG Refers 12 Ex-Priests For Prosecution Of Suspected Sexual Abuse

Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt announced Friday he is referring 12 former priests for criminal prosecution on charges of sexual abuse of minors following a 13-month-long investigation of church personnel records dating back almost 75 years. The investigation, detailed in a 329-page report , covered more than 2,000 priests who have served in Missouri since 1945, and included some 300 deacons, seminarians and religious women in that state's four dioceses. The investigators also spoke...

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Opinion: President Trump Claims He Was At Ground Zero On Sept. 11. But Was He?

News organizations now refer to President Trump's whoppers — from the size of his inaugural crowds to a hurricane threatening Alabama — as routinely as referring to rain in Seattle. But, there was still some surprise this week when at services to mark the 18th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks, the president insisted , "Soon after, I went down to Ground Zero with men who worked for me to try to help in any little way that we could ... We were not alone. So many others were scattered around...

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Air Ambulances Woo Rural Consumers With Memberships That May Leave Them Hanging

On a hot June day in Fort Scott, Kan., as the Good Ol' Days festival was in full swing, 7-year-old Kaidence Anderson sat in the shade with her family, waiting for a medevac helicopter to land. A crowd had gathered to see the display prearranged by staff at the town's historic fort. "It's going to show us how it's going to help other people because we don't have the hospital anymore," the redheaded girl explained. Mercy Hospital Fort Scott closed at the end of 2018, leaving this rural...

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UAW Goes On Strike Against General Motors

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET Monday
The United Auto Workers began a nationwide strike just before midnight on Sunday at General Motors after both sides failed to agree on a new contract over issues including wages, health care and profit-sharing. Production across the U.S. is expected to be halted, affecting nearly 50,000 worker at 33 manufacturing plants in nine states as well as 22 parts distribution warehouses until a new contract is hammered out. "At midnight tonight, the picket lines...

Read More

A Portrait Of Molly Ivins, Maverick Texas Journalist, In 'Raise Hell'

Today, it's almost hard to remember just how different the Texas government was back in the 1970s. That's when Molly Ivins scorched a trail through good-ol'-boy politics like a flamethrower through a cactus patch. "The legislature was fairly corrupt in those days," she said to NPR in 2006. "And the fact that it was, and that everybody knew it, and that people laughed about it, struck me as worth reporting. And I thought: Why not put it in the way it is?" That simple but radical idea set Ivins...

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Democrats Get Closer To Serious Field Of Trump Challengers

There was something different about the Democratic debate this week, compared with the earlier rounds this summer. Something was happening that was hard to pin down, but it was palpable. Not the contrast of night and day, but perhaps the difference between dusk and dawn. It's a critical difference, and it comes at a crucial time. Because the Trump presidency these candidates are competing to truncate has reached what may be a critical juncture. But more of that in a moment. This week, the...

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British Authorities Scramble To Find Stolen Solid Gold Toilet

British police have arrested a 66-year-old man in connection with the theft of a solid gold toilet from a palace west of London. The toilet, titled America , is a work of art by the 58-year-old Italian artist Maurizio Cattelan. It had been installed for an exhibition at England's Blenheim Palace earlier this week. Blenheim Palace confirmed the theft in a statement posted on Twitter . "We are saddened by this extraordinary event, but also relieved no-one was hurt," the statement said. "We are...

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