Developers for the Patton Crossing project in the State College area submitted a sketch plan for public comment on Wednesday.
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Sketch Plan For Patton Township Development Includes Changes Welcomed By Community

Developers for the Patton Crossing project in the State College area submitted a sketch plan for public comment on Wednesday. In the proposed plan, the Patton Crossing project will have a main entrance on North Atherton street. Three one-story commercial buildings will face the busy road. The hotel, which was originally placed on the south side of the project, has been brought to the center of the 28-arce lot, farther from the Park Forest neighborhood. The sketch plan features an asymmetrical...

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Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

Penn State professor Alex Hristov
Emily Reddy / WPSU

It’s feeding time at an experimental dairy barn not far from Beaver stadium. A big square machine on wheels spits a pile of hay in front of each cow on one side of the barn, and lab assistant Chan Hee Lee pours a bucket of dried green leaf bits on top.

As the feeding machine finishes up and rolls out of the barn, Alex Hristov says they tried a lot of things before they found oregano reduced cows’ methane output.

“We started with essential oils,” Hristov said. “Lavender, mint. Citrus, onion, anything, you name it.

So why is Hristov focused on cutting methane?

This I Believe: I Believe In Remembering

Aug 12, 2010

I sometimes forget I have an older sister. She passed away before I was born, but that doesn't mean I don't have a sister. I didn't know about her until I was 12 years old. But now I think of her often.

Shortly before we moved to the United States from Kirgizstan, on New Year’s Day, my dad pulled me aside and told me we had to go visit a “special little person.” My dad took a deep breath and told me about the short life of my older sister.

This I Believe: I Believe In Heavy Metal

Mar 11, 2010

I believe heavy metal.
 
When I was 12 years old I saw Metallica’s music video for the song, “One.” The video mixes gritty black and white band footage with excerpts from the film Johnny Got His Gun about a hospitalized soldier who lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and speech to a landmine. Over this footage, “One” goes from lament to unstoppable barrage.
 
I believed this song.
 

This I Believe: I Believe In Making The Bed

Dec 24, 2009

When I was growing up, I fought constantly with my parents over making my bed in the morning. An after-breakfast check-in was routine at my house. My mom or dad would walk down the hall, check each room, and call from upstairs, "Stop whatever it is you're doing and come make your bed." It was a chore that I simply did NOT like, and so I avoided it. I thought it was absurd to make my bed every morning. It was counterproductive. What could be the benefit of straightening a bed in the morning that would inevitably be undone that evening? This puzzled me for a long time.

This I Believe: I Believe In Caring

Dec 10, 2009

Just a few years ago I was a stereotypical teenager. Everything was about "me." I wasn't interested in anyone else or their needs. I often neglected my family because time with my friends seemed more important. Family dinners were a burden and vacations a punishment.

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

This I Believe: I Believe In Public Radio

Apr 2, 2009

For many people, April 15 is TAX DAY! April 15 for me, however, has a different significance…

In 1982, I moved to a small mountain town in Colorado. I thought I’d found the perfect place to live. But there was one thing missing. No public radio. I used to spin the FM dial searching for the voice of the community.  All I would hear was canned music or talk programs packaged somewhere far away and made local only by the commercials injected.

This I Believe: I Believe In Slowing Down

Feb 5, 2009

On a rainy morning when I was ten, my neighbor Mr. Lovett invited me into his home for a woodworking project. Above his fireplace sat an ornate eagle carved by Mr. Lovett himself. Its wingspan was wider than I was tall. I remember wondering how long it took him to make that eagle.

Mr. Lovett guided my block of wood under the scroll saw until it morphed into the rough outline of a duck.

Each year, WPSU holds our "Art for the Airwaves" contest. And our panel of judges selects a winner, whose work is made into a limited edition poster print offered during our fund drive. WPSU's Kristine Allen visited Smethport to talk with this year's winner.  

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Dutch pop and R&B singer Benny Sings (a.k.a. Tim van Berkestijn) hasn't blown up yet, but it's not for the lack of exposure. You've heard his music before and probably didn't know it: His songs have been featured in TV commercials, as well as on hit shows on HBO and Netflix.

Even though the essays, speeches, and meditations in Toni Morrison's most recent nonfiction collection were written over the course of four decades, The Source of Self-Regard speaks to today's social and political moment as directly as this morning's headlines.

There's this one scene in The Hangover. A man jumps out of the trunk of a car — completely naked — and attacks Bradley Cooper with a crowbar.

Seattle Punks Tacocat Throw A Party To Celebrate Self-Love

7 minutes ago

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When the palindromic, Seattle-based female-fronted quartet Tacocat debuted in 2007, it helped kick off a new era of glittering, DIY feminist punk, paving the way for acts like Chastity

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Manafort Intentionally Lied To Special Counsel, Judge Says

Updated at 8:07 p.m. ET A federal judge has ruled that President Trump's former 2016 campaign chairman Paul Manafort intentionally lied to special counsel Robert Mueller's office after agreeing to cooperate with its investigation into interference by Russia into the last presidential election. The ruling from Judge Amy Berman Jackson means prosecutors are no longer bound by their plea deal with Manafort, who now faces the prospect of spending the rest of his life in prison. Manafort agreed to...

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Poll: A Year After Parkland, Urgency For New Gun Restrictions Declines

One year after the school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., the urgency for new gun restrictions has declined, but roughly half the country is concerned a mass shooting could happen at a school in their community, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds. In the immediate aftermath of the mass shooting that killed 17 people on Valentine's Day, 71 percent of Americans said laws covering the sale of firearms should be stricter. Now, it's 51 percent. When it...

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Same-Sex Couples Sue For The Right To Marry In Japan

Thirteen same-sex couples have filed a lawsuit in Japan arguing that the country's rejection of same-sex marriage violates their constitutional rights. It's the first such lawsuit in the country, Japan Times reports . While no laws on the books technically prohibit same-sex marriage, Japan's government has interpreted the constitution's marriage provisions to only permit only marriage between heterosexual couples. But that reading ignores other parts of the constitution that guarantee...

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Military Families In Privatized Housing 'Afraid To Come Forward,' Survey Says

Severe mold, asbestos and electrical hazards are among the dangers in private military housing for thousands of service members' families, according to a new survey conducted by the Military Family Advisory Network. The report was released Wednesday, in conjunction with a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing about the state of privately managed military housing. Nearly 17,000 people responded to the survey across 46 states. And more than 55 percent of participants who lived in private...

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NRA Facing Most Formidable Opposition Yet, A Year After Parkland

For the National Rifle Association, the year since the Parkland shooting has led to a changing — and less favorable — political landscape. Democrats control the House of Representatives, public opinion polling shows a majority of Americans support expanded background checks, and the NRA's political spending is down. And for the first time ever, a growing and better-funded movement now exists to counter the gun rights group. Fred Guttenberg is one of the people now part of that movement. After...

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Between Love And Hate: A Valentine's Day Playlist

It's no question that people love to write songs about, well, love. These songs come in forms as varied as the artists who pen them: bitter breakup ballads; euphoric memories of puppy-dog infatuation; reflections on unrequited affection. But if love and hate exist on a spectrum, most songs seem to find themselves on one side or the other. When we conducted an online poll last week asking for your favorite love and breakup songs, we were surprised to see many people picking the very same song...

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You May Be Surprised To Learn Which 2 Countries Are Making The Globe A Lot Greener

The world is getting greener. That's according to Chi Chen , a doctoral student in the Department of Earth and Environment at Boston University. Chen has been mining data collected by an orbiting NASA camera that monitors green vegetation on Earth's surface, day by day. This week, Chen and his colleagues published a new study showing that the amount of our planet's land surface covered by green leaves increased between 2000 and 2017. The extent of the global greening is bigger than previously...

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The Strike That Changed U.S. Labor

On February 11, 1937, General Motors and the United Auto Workers union signed a landmark agreement. A union contract. The relationship with U.S. automakers and the labor movement ushered in a period of tremendous worker prosperity and union strength that lasted decades. Today, though, unions are a shadow of their former selves and are sometimes even vilified for dragging down companies and hamstringing workers. What happened? How did unions lose their mojo? Find us: Twitter / Facebook .

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When Teens Threaten Violence, A Community Responds With Compassion

Psychologist John Van Dreal has spent almost 30 years working with troubled kids. Still, it's always unsettling to get the kind of phone call he received one morning eight years ago as he was on his way to a meeting. "I got a call from the assistant principal at North [Salem] High, reporting that a student had made some threats on the Internet," remembers Van Dreal, the director of safety and risk management for Salem-Keizer Public Schools in Salem, Ore. Threats of violence in a Facebook post...

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Listening For The Future During Black History Month

Music may not see color, but the music industry certainly does. Until the systemic and overt biases that undermine our celebration of the contributions of black artists can be eradicated, we appreciate Black History Month as an opportunity to lay the groundwork for conversations we should be having and actions we should be taking year-round. Rodney Carmichael , NPR Music's staff hip-hop writer, says he likes to think instead about Black Futures Month , centered around looking forward rather...

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Medical Anthropologist Explores 'Vaccine Hesitancy'

Distrust of vaccines may be almost as contagious as measles, according to medical anthropologist Elisa Sobo. More than 100 people have been infected with measles this year, according to the Centers for Disease Control . Over 50 of those cases have occurred in southwest Washington state and northwest Oregon in an outbreak that led Washington Gov. Jay Inslee to declare a state of emergency on Jan. 25. Some public health officials blame the surge of cases on low vaccination rates for this highly...

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Impress Your Valentine With Chocolate-Tasting Tips From A Chef

Thinking about a gift to give your valentine? Theres always chocolate. But you might not know about techniques you can use to uncover different chocolates unique traits.  Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst shares tasting tips, and a few of her favorite chocolates, with hosts Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson. Ive been tasting chocolate lots of chocolate. And let me begin by saying, as jobs go, this is a good one. Lets start this lesson by taking a minute to learn some very basic information...

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U.S. National Debt Hits Record $22 Trillion

The U.S. government's public debt is now more than $22 trillion — the highest it has ever been. The Treasury Department data comes as tax revenue has fallen and federal spending continues to rise. The new debt level reflects a rise of more than $2 trillion from the day President Trump took office in 2017. Despite being in the second-longest economic expansion since the post–World War II boom, the U.S. is projected to rack up annual deficits and incur national debt at rates not seen since the...

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Americans Lost $143 Million In Online Relationship Scams Last Year

The Federal Trade Commission is celebrating Valentine's Day by reminding people to not get scammed when looking for love. The agency received more than 21,000 reports about romance scams in 2018, with total reported losses of $143 million. Of those who said they lost money in a romance scam, the median amount lost was $2,600 — seven times more than the median loss for other types of frauds tracked by the FTC. Romance scammers often use online dating sites and create fake profiles or use a...

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Rare, Elusive Black Leopard Caught On Camera In The Wild

The elusive black leopard has been sighted. In Kenya, the vast majority of leopards have a light coat with dark spots. A tiny minority of them have a genetic mutation called melanism that causes them to appear all black in the daylight. According to San Diego Zoo Global , the spots show up in infrared imagery at night. There have been lots of stories about the unique animal in central Kenya's Laikipia County, the location of multiple recent sightings. San Diego Zoo Global researchers captured...

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Gospel Roots of Rock & Soul

Gospel Roots of Rock and Soul is a special four-part weekly radio show celebrating Black gospel music's profound influence on rock and soul music. Sundays at 9:00pm & Thursdays at 1:00pm in February.

Attention Teachers: NPR Student Podcast Contest

Submissions for the NPR Student Podcast Challenge are now open! This contest is for teachers with students between 5th and 12th grade. Read the rules and submit at the link below.

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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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