Take Note

Brian Southwell is director of science in the public sphere at RTI International. We spoke with Southwell about communicating science, whether fact checking works and the idea behind his weekly radio show and podcast, “The Measure of Everyday Life.”  

Tommie Smith, Wyomia Tyus and Dr. Harry Edwards.
WPSU

At the 1968 Olympics, gold medalist Tommie Smith took the podium and raised his fist in what became one of the most iconic sports moments of all time. Wyomie Tyus dedicated her '68 gold medal to Smith. Sociologist Harry Edwards helped organize the protests. WPSU's Lindsey Whissel Fenton talked with Smith, Tyus, and Dr. Edwards about the lasting impact of the 1968 Olympic games.

Lisa Ko, author of "The Leavers."
Lisa Ko

Author Lisa Ko's debut novel, "The Leavers," won the 2016 PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction and was a finalist for the 2017 National Book Award. The novel explores issues relating to immigration and identity after Polly Guo, an undocumented Chinese immigrant, goes to work one morning and never returns home. Her 11-year-old son, Deming, is placed in foster care and eventually adopted by a white family that changes his name to Daniel.

Richard Biever and Tammy Miller.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

WPSU's Carolyn Donaldson talked with FUSE Productions' Producing Artistic Director Richard Biever about the theater company's upcoming production of Stephen Sondheim's "Merrily We Roll Along." He was joined by community leader Tammy Miller, who is part of an auxiliary project, "Dreams Don't Die," where community members share stories of pursuing their dreams.

Twenty years ago, Penn State professor Michael Bérubé wrote a book about raising his young son Jamie, who has Down syndrome. Jamie is now 26 years old. Michael has written a follow-up book, “Life as Jamie Knows It: An Exceptional Child Grows Up,” which explores Jamie’s growing independence, his difficulty finding a fulfilling job, and more. WPSU’s Adison Godfrey talked with Michael and Jamie about the book.

Farmland on the road that runs between Titusville and Corry School Districts.
Kevin McCorry / Keystone Crossroads

In the past, the Keystone Crossroads reporting project, which WPSU is a part of, has looked at the issues facing education in cities. Kevin McCorry is the education reporter and the editor of the project.

photo: courtesy of Scott Sackett & Paul Lamont

On Thursday, January 4 at 8:00pm, WPSU-TV will broadcast the PBS documentary, “Lake of Betrayal: The Story of Kinzua Dam” about the history of the Kinzua Dam in Warren County, Pennsylvania. 

Lonnie Bunch, founding director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture.
National Museum of African American History and Culture

Lonnie Bunch is the founding director of the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture. Bunch's career in museums spans nearly thirty years. Prior to his current position, Bunch worked at the National Museum of American History, the California African American Museum and the National Air and Space Museum. WPSU's Cheraine Stanford talked with Bunch about the ten years it took to create the National Museum of African American History and Culture and its importance to the American story.

This week, Patty Satalia talks with the Democratic candidate for Pennsylvania’s 5th congressional district, Kerith Strano-Taylor. 

She’s an attorney from Brookville, Pennsylvania. She called her first congressional bid in 2014 a “dry run.” She’s owner of the Taylor law firm and director of her local school board. She’s running against incumbent Republican Glenn Thompson, who first won his seat in 2008.   

(Photo: WPSU)

David Folkenflik is Media Correspondent for NPR News. His stories are heard on All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Here & Now, as well as on on NPR's website and mobile platforms.  He joined NPR in 2004, after a decade as a reporter for the Baltimore Sun, where he covered higher education, politics, and the media.

Business Insider has called Folkenflik one of the 50 most influential people in American media.

Folkenflik is author of the book Murdoch's World: The Last of the Old Media Empires.

Lewis Goldstein
Penn State/Flickr

    

How is organic food changing the landscape of food production? We talk with the vice president of brand marketing for Organic Valley, Lewis Goldstein, about his unique company and why they think everyone should know what’s in their food.  

Editor's Note
Jan. 7, 2016

We originally said organic food is grown without the use of pesticides. Organic farmers can use pesticides from a restricted list approved by the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB). 



Russell Gold
Joel Salcido

Russell Gold is a reporter for The Wall Street Journal and the author of “The Boom.” The book covers the history of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, in the United States and the characters who made it what it is today. Gold spoke about the evolving technology of fracking, which has included the use of everything from napalm to nuclear bombs; the controversy about assigning “The Boom” to Penn State freshmen; and Gold’s parents’ story about leasing their land in Sullivan County, Pennsylvania.   

Shoba Wadhia, author of "Beyond Deportation"
Erin Cassidy Hendrick / WPSU

Under U.S. immigration law, one of the most widely used but misunderstood concepts is prosecutorial discretion. Simply put, that’s the influence immigration officials have on the outcome of a deportation case. It allows authorities to grant “non-priority” status to some illegal immigrants – hoping to use their limited resources to target the more dangerous individuals.

Carol Sanford
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Carol Sanford is a business consultant who has worked with organizations from Google to DuPont to Colgate Palmolive. She’s the author of “The Responsible Business” and, most recently, “The Responsible Entrepreneur.” She spoke with WPSU about what it means to be a responsible entrepreneur and how that’s actually better for business. 

Kristine Allen

Actress and filmmaker Anna Martemucci grew up in State College.  She was a contestant on the STARZ reality show called “The Chair” which filmed her as she directed her own film, “Hollidaysburg.”  It’s about college freshmen from Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania who come home for a Thanksgiving holiday.

WPSU’s Kristine Allen talks with Martemucci about her career, her film, and what it’s like to be on a reality show.

Although he didn’t coin the term microaggressions—that’s the word used to describe hurtful, often subtle racial and ethnic slights—Derald Wing Sue has literally written the book on the subject.  Sue is a professor of psychology and education at Columbia University and the author of Microaggressions in Everyday Life.  Sue visited Penn State to give a talk on microaggressions in higher education. 

Jonathan Jansen is the first black president of the University of the Free State in South Africa. A gifted speaker and writer, he’s earned a formidable reputation for his commitment to reconciliation in a racially divided society. We’ll talk with him about the notorious Reitz video that sent shock waves throughout the world, about reconciliation and about the future of Mandela’s rainbow nation.   

More on Jonathan Jansen
 

University of the Free State: Jonathan Jansen

What do you get when you mix a Masters of Fine Arts and a Medical Doctor? The answer is Dr. David Teplica, a Penn State alumnus who uses his unique combination of talents in the Fine Arts and Plastic Surgery to bring about a better understanding of human anatomy. We'll talk with him about how photography has made him a better surgeon, and vice versa, about the need for gender-specific plastic surgery, and about what he's learned from his decade's long study of identical twins. 

On August 4-7, State College will host the 18th National Autism Conference. Today on Take Note we talk with Dr. Daniel Notterman about the current state of autism research. Dr. Notterman has just stepped down from the position of vice dean for research and graduate studies -- and professor of pediatrics and biochemistry -- at Penn State College of Medicine. He’s going to Princeton University, where he’ll continue his research into the causes of autism. WPSU’s Emily Reddy talked with Dr. Notterman about where we are in our understanding of autism.

Pete Hatemi
Kristine Allen / WPSU

Pete Hatemi teaches Political Science, Microbiology and Biochemistry at Penn State. His research explores the complex connection between evolution and our political attitudes. He speaks with WPSU’s Kristine Allen.

We’ve been hearing a lot about the Common Core recently. Oklahoma and South Carolina withdrew from the national education standards last week. Indiana pulled out in March. State College education expert and former Department of Education consultant Henry Brzycki tells us why he thinks the Common Core and other high stakes testing is not the best answer for educating our kids.

Have attitudes about race and inequality changed for the better? We'll ask our guest, William Darity Jr., the Samuel Dubois Cook professor of Public Policy, African and African American Studies, and Economics at Duke University.  He's also the founding director of the Research Network on Racial and Ethnic Inequality at Duke and served as director of Graduate Studies at the University of North Carolina.

The Pennsylvania primary is just a few days away.  What are the races to watch, who are the candidates, and what's at stake?  Terry Madonna directs the Center for Politics and Public Affairs at Franklin & Marshall College.  He's also the director of the Franklin & Marshall College Poll, formerly known as the Keystone Poll. 

The primary election is May 20th.  Last week you heard from York businessman Tom Wolf and former secretary of the PA DEP Katie McGinty.  They're two of four Democrats vying to win their party's nomination and a chance to unseat Republican Governor Tom Corbett.  Now hear from State Treasurer Rob McCord and Congresswoman Allyson Schwartz.  

 

Today’s guest, Jeffry Wert, is a historian and author who specializes in the American Civil War. He's written nine books about the Civil War. His book, Gettysburg--Day Three, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. Wert also taught at Penns Valley Area High School for more than three decades. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked with him about his career as an author and teacher.

 Bob Zellner’s story starts about as far as you can get from where it ended up. Born in lower Alabama, his father, uncles and grandfather were robe-wearing members of the Ku Klux Klan. In his inspirational memoir, "The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement,” he chronicles his journey to become one of the first white southerners in the early civil rights movement.

We remember Col. Gerald Russell, a decorated Marine commander and devoted community volunteer. He died February 24, 2014, at age 97. We share our last interview with him from May, 2007. Plus, historian Jeffry Wert on the significance of Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address, which he delivered 149 years ago this week. Some say it’s his greatest speech.