PASA

A new report out of Penn State University says corn production in the Southeastern part of the state could be especially vulnerable in the coming decades.
Photo provided by Greg Roth/Penn State

Last month, Pennsylvania saw the most recorded rainfall in a July. For many farmers in the state, the intense precipitation is part of a pattern of weather changes they are trying to adapt to.

A new report out of Penn State University says corn production in the Southeastern part of the state could be especially vulnerable in the coming decades.

It takes at least 100 years for one inch of topsoil to form. In Pennsylvania, farmers are becoming increasingly interested in managing soil to produce healthier, more sustainable crops.

PASA's "Farming for the Future" conference advertisement.
PASA

This year is the last that the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture – or PASA – will hold its annual conference in State College.

PASA has hosted its winter conference at the Penn Stater Conference Center and Hotel for most of the event’s 27 years. Executive Director Hannah Smith-Brubaker said PASA was happy with the Penn Stater, but after a recent review the hotel more than doubled the cost to host the event.

Hannah Smith-Brubaker in front of a farm
Albert Yee

After 15 years, the Pennsylvania Association for Sustainable Agriculture, or PASA, has a new executive director. Hannah Smith-Brubaker left the job of Deputy Secretary of Agriculture for Pennsylvania to lead this local, but nationally-known organization, which promotes sustainable farming. She also helps manage Village Acres, a farm in Juniata County. Smith-Brubaker talked with WPSU’s Emily Reddy about her plans for PASA.

According to the CDC, contaminated foods cause 3,000 deaths a year in the US. In response to large-scale and highly-publicized contaminations in recent years to foods like spinach and peanut butter, the government has created the Food Safety Modernization Act. But WPSU's Emily Reddy talked with one advocate who worries the bill will hurt smaller farms.