Jerry Sandusky

A group of Penn State trustees is calling on the entire board to reject the 2012 Freeh report on the Jerry Sandusky scandal. They said they’ve done their own in-depth review and are asking the board to release it.

That group met on the University Park campus today. But there weren’t enough board members to hold an official meeting.

In the middle of the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal, Penn State hired former FBI director Louis Freeh to conduct a review. His findings have been the source of controversy.

Graham Spanier and Jerry Sandusky
Gene J. Puskar / AP

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Penn State president Graham Spanier lost an appeal Tuesday of his misdemeanor conviction for child endangerment over his handling of a 2001 complaint about Jerry Sandusky showering with a boy in the football team locker room.

woman giving tour
Anne Danahy / WPSU

Children who visit Penn State’s new Center for Healthy Children participate in art projects, science demonstrations and learning. As they’re doing that, researchers are trying to figure out what will improve their lives down the road.

Jennie Noll, director of the center, said during an open house Friday that researchers want to learn more about the health consequences of abuse and neglect.

Graham Spanier
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Penn State president Graham Spanier has been found guilty of one count of child endangerment over his handling of a child sex abuse complaint against retired assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

Jurors on Friday acquitted the 68-year-old Spanier of the other two counts he faced: conspiracy and another count of child endangerment

The verdict comes more than five years after Sandusky was first charged with sexually abusing children.

Graham Spanier walking up courthouse stairs, surrounded by TV cameras
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- After over 6 hours of discussion and several questions to the judge, the jury in former Penn State President Graham Spanier’s child endangerment case ended its first day of deliberation without a verdict.

They’re deciding if Spanier knowingly endangered children when he and colleagues failed to report football coach Jerry Sandusky’s sexual abuse of children to authorities.

The 12 men and women are reconvening Friday morning. Judge John Boccabella has said he aims to have a decision before the weekend.

Graham Spanier photo on left. Jerry Sandusky photo on right.
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

Lawyers for former Penn State President Graham Spanier have rested without calling any witnesses.

He's facing charges for failing to a report a 2001 incident involving the sexual abuse of a child.

Closing arguments focused on what Spanier knew about Jerry Sandusky. Spanier's lawyers say he was told Mike McQueary saw Jerry Sandusky in a university shower on a Friday night with a boy, and described it as horseplay.

They point out no witness testified that Spanier was told sexual contact occurred between Sandusky and the child.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier surrounded by reporters
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- In the Dauphin County Courthouse, the child endangerment case against former Penn State President Graham Spanier is entering its second phase. The prosecution has rested, and now it’s the defense’s turn.

The case will resume Thursday, although it’s unclear who Spanier’s lawyers plan to call and whether the defendant himself will speak. 

The information presented over the last two days has spanned nearly two decades, beginning with Penn State’s first child abuse investigation of Sandusky in 1998.

Tim Curley
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) – The primary witnesses for the prosecution are testifying Wednesday in the child endangerment trial of former Penn State President Graham Spanier.

Spanier’s charged with failing to act aggressively enough to prevent football coach Jerry Sandusky from serially abusing young boys.

One of those witnesses—former Penn State Athletic Director Tim Curley—handled the case alongside Spanier, and has already said he wishes he did more.

Graham Spanier walking up courthouse stairs, surrounded by TV cameras
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) – Both the prosecution and defense have begun laying out their arguments in day two of the trial of Graham Spanier—the former Penn State president whose tenure included the years assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky serially abused young children.

The case being set up revolves around whether Spanier’s decision not to inform child protective services of Sandusky’s abuse was criminal—or just a bad judgment call.

Judge Sets March Trial For 3 Penn State Ex-Administrators

Feb 2, 2017
Gary Schultz, Graham Spanier and Tim Curley
AP Photos

Three former Penn State administrators are headed for trial next month on criminal charges related to how they handled the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

On Wednesday, Judge John Boccabella set jury selection for March 20 in the criminal trial of former university President Graham Spanier, former Vice President Gary Schultz and former athletic director Tim Curley.

They're charged with endangering the welfare of children.

Boccabella is throwing out a charge of failure to properly report suspected abuse, saying the statute of limitations has expired.

In this Jan. 22, 2012 file photo, a woman pays her respects at a statue of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno outside Beaver Stadium on the Penn State University campus after learning of his death in State College, Pa. Paterno was 85.
Gene J. Puskar / AP

Since the Sandusky scandal, Penn State hasn’t publicly commemorated former head football coach, Joe Paterno. That will change this Saturday at the matchup against Temple - and it’s reignited a debate about how and if Paterno should be recognized.

“We thought it was too soon, it was insensitive and just not the right time.”

Lauren Davis is the opinions editor at the Penn State student newspaper, The Daily Collegian. She recently wrote an editorial arguing against the tribute.

Graham Spanier and Jerry Sandusky
Gene J. Puskar / AP

Prosecutors say former Penn State administrators should still stand trial for their involvement in the Jerry Sandusky scandal. 

Based on documents made public Wednesday, the prosecution rejected arguments made by Graham Spanier, Gary Schultz and Tim Curley that the charges against them should be dismissed.

One of defense’s arguments was the statute of limitations in the case had expired. In their response, the prosecution said that by not reporting the suspected child abuse in 2001, the two-year timeframe never started.

Former Penn State University assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, center, arrives at the Centre County Courthouse for an appeals hearing about whether he was improperly convicted four years ago, in Bellefonte, Pa. Friday, Aug. 12, 2016.
GENE J. PUSKAR / AP

Tuesday's hearing called witnesses from the prosecution of Sandusky’s case.  Much of the questioning focused on whether Sarah Ganim, the journalist who broke the story, got her information from an illegal grand jury leak.

Two of the prosecutors said Ganim’s source could have been a grand jury witness. They were legally able to talk about the case to anyone.

Jerry Sandusky entering courthouse with paperwork
AP Photo / Gene J. Puskar

A grinning Jerry Sandusky, dressed in an orange jumpsuit, entered a Centre County courtroom Friday morning, waving to a small handful of supporters. The former Penn State assistant football coach is almost four years into a 30 to 60-year sentence for child sexual abuse, most of which has been spent in solitary confinement for his own protection.

Sandusky and Paterno
Paul Vathis / AP Photo

A man who claims Jerry Sandusky sexually abused him in 1976 says in newly unsealed court documents that he told Penn State football Coach Joe Paterno about the incident the very next day, and Paterno responded callously.

The man identified as John Doe 150 testified in October 2014 that about six other boys in a shower heard him yell that Sandusky had sexually penetrated him with a finger.

A judge unsealed extensive records Tuesday from Penn State's insurance litigation over coverage of Sandusky-related claims.

Court Restores Sandusky Pension

Nov 13, 2015
(AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

 A Pennsylvania court is ordering the state government to restore the pension of former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky, who was convicted of sexually abusing 10 boys.

A Commonwealth Court panel ruled unanimously Friday that the State Employees' Retirement Board wrongly concluded Sandusky was a Penn State employee when he committed the crimes that were the basis for the pension forfeiture.

The pension is worth about $4,900 a month to Sandusky and his wife, Dottie.

Kathleen Kane at microphones
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

A Pennsylvania judge is demanding the attorney general attend a closed-door hearing to be questioned under oath about any leaks by prosecutors or a judge of secret grand jury material from the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse investigation.

The order issued Wednesday by Judge John Cleland says Attorney General Kathleen Kane had just informed him she had ''no knowledge at this time of any email'' to prove such leaks occurred.

Eleanor Klibanoff / WPSU

Jerry Sandusky returned to court today for the first time since he was sentenced in 2012. He's currently serving 30 to 60 years in state prison for the molestation of multiple boys, a crime he committed while an assistant football coach at Penn State. 

Old Main
WPSU

The Penn State board is authorizing university officials to settle litigation related to Jerry Sandusky, but it is unclear how much money is at stake.

The trustees voted 18 to 6 on Thursday to let high-ranking administrators execute settlements.

Chairman Keith Masser says the board discussed dollar limits during a closed session before the vote.

He says the authorization covers "one or more" claims related to the actions of Sandusky, the school's former assistant football coach now serving a lengthy prison sentence for child molestation.

Eric Barron
Gene J. Puskar / AP

Penn State president Eric Barron sent the following letter out to the Penn State community Thursday evening, addressing his thoughts on Penn State "Post-Sandusky."  

_______________________________________

On the Challenges facing Penn State University Post-Sandusky

Jerry Sandusky is denied $4,900-a-month pension

Dec 19, 2014
Jerry Sandusky
Matt Rourke, File / AP Photo

Former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky has lost a legal battle to restore his $4,900-a-month pension, a benefit that was canceled two years ago after he was sentenced for child molestation.

The State Employees' Retirement Board's 122-page opinion, made public Friday, determined Sandusky remained a Penn State employee after his announced retirement in 1999, meaning his abuse of children fell under a 2004 state law that added sexual offenses against students to the crimes that trigger forfeiture.

Tom Corbett
Mary Wilson

A report released Monday detailing the handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation case faults police and prosecutors for long delays in bringing charges but found no evidence that politics affected the investigation.

The report, commissioned by Democratic Attorney General Kathleen Kane and written by former federal prosecutor Geoff Moulton, blamed a three-year time lapse in filing charges on communication problems, an expungement of a 1998 complaint about the former Penn State coach and a failure to take certain investigative steps early on.

AG Kane to Release Sandusky Report Monday

Jun 20, 2014

Pennsylvania's top prosecutor plans to release a report next week into how police and prosecutors handled the Jerry Sandusky case.

Attorney General Kathleen Kane said Friday that Geoff Moulton's review will be released Monday morning at a Capitol news conference.

Kane vowed to look into the child molestation investigation while running for office in 2012.