Graham Spanier

Graham Spanier and Jerry Sandusky
Gene J. Puskar / AP

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Penn State president Graham Spanier lost an appeal Tuesday of his misdemeanor conviction for child endangerment over his handling of a 2001 complaint about Jerry Sandusky showering with a boy in the football team locker room.

Graham Spanier
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Former Penn State president Graham Spanier has been found guilty of one count of child endangerment over his handling of a child sex abuse complaint against retired assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky.

Jurors on Friday acquitted the 68-year-old Spanier of the other two counts he faced: conspiracy and another count of child endangerment

The verdict comes more than five years after Sandusky was first charged with sexually abusing children.

Graham Spanier walking up courthouse stairs, surrounded by TV cameras
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- After over 6 hours of discussion and several questions to the judge, the jury in former Penn State President Graham Spanier’s child endangerment case ended its first day of deliberation without a verdict.

They’re deciding if Spanier knowingly endangered children when he and colleagues failed to report football coach Jerry Sandusky’s sexual abuse of children to authorities.

The 12 men and women are reconvening Friday morning. Judge John Boccabella has said he aims to have a decision before the weekend.

Graham Spanier photo on left. Jerry Sandusky photo on right.
Gene J. Puskar / AP Photo

Lawyers for former Penn State President Graham Spanier have rested without calling any witnesses.

He's facing charges for failing to a report a 2001 incident involving the sexual abuse of a child.

Closing arguments focused on what Spanier knew about Jerry Sandusky. Spanier's lawyers say he was told Mike McQueary saw Jerry Sandusky in a university shower on a Friday night with a boy, and described it as horseplay.

They point out no witness testified that Spanier was told sexual contact occurred between Sandusky and the child.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier surrounded by reporters
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- In the Dauphin County Courthouse, the child endangerment case against former Penn State President Graham Spanier is entering its second phase. The prosecution has rested, and now it’s the defense’s turn.

The case will resume Thursday, although it’s unclear who Spanier’s lawyers plan to call and whether the defendant himself will speak. 

The information presented over the last two days has spanned nearly two decades, beginning with Penn State’s first child abuse investigation of Sandusky in 1998.

Tim Curley
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) – The primary witnesses for the prosecution are testifying Wednesday in the child endangerment trial of former Penn State President Graham Spanier.

Spanier’s charged with failing to act aggressively enough to prevent football coach Jerry Sandusky from serially abusing young boys.

One of those witnesses—former Penn State Athletic Director Tim Curley—handled the case alongside Spanier, and has already said he wishes he did more.

Graham Spanier walking up courthouse stairs, surrounded by TV cameras
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) – Both the prosecution and defense have begun laying out their arguments in day two of the trial of Graham Spanier—the former Penn State president whose tenure included the years assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky serially abused young children.

The case being set up revolves around whether Spanier’s decision not to inform child protective services of Sandusky’s abuse was criminal—or just a bad judgment call.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier surrounded by reporters
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- There’s just one criminal trial left in court related to the child sex abuse case that has surrounded former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky since 2011.

It's the trial of former Penn State President Graham Spanier, who is charged with handling the abuse improperly. 

When allegations that Sandusky was abusing young boys surfaced in 2001, Spanier and others didn't report it to authorities, opting instead to handle it as an internal matter.

Judge Sets March Trial For 3 Penn State Ex-Administrators

Feb 2, 2017
Gary Schultz, Graham Spanier and Tim Curley
AP Photos

Three former Penn State administrators are headed for trial next month on criminal charges related to how they handled the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

On Wednesday, Judge John Boccabella set jury selection for March 20 in the criminal trial of former university President Graham Spanier, former Vice President Gary Schultz and former athletic director Tim Curley.

They're charged with endangering the welfare of children.

Boccabella is throwing out a charge of failure to properly report suspected abuse, saying the statute of limitations has expired.

Graham Spanier and Jerry Sandusky
Gene J. Puskar / AP

Prosecutors say former Penn State administrators should still stand trial for their involvement in the Jerry Sandusky scandal. 

Based on documents made public Wednesday, the prosecution rejected arguments made by Graham Spanier, Gary Schultz and Tim Curley that the charges against them should be dismissed.

One of defense’s arguments was the statute of limitations in the case had expired. In their response, the prosecution said that by not reporting the suspected child abuse in 2001, the two-year timeframe never started.

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

A Pennsylvania appeals court on Friday dismissed several of the more serious criminal charges against former Penn State administrators that relate to their handling of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

The Superior Court ruled that Cynthia Baldwin, the university's then-general counsel, should not have testified against Gary Schultz, Tim Curley and Graham Spanier during grand jury proceedings.