Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

At least seven people were wounded by a man with a knife who went on a stabbing rampage in the northern Russian city of Surgut.

No one was killed in the attack in the central Siberian city, but four people were in serious condition, according to state-run Tass news agency, which cited a regional health official.

Islamic State says the man — shot dead by police — was a "soldier" of the extremist group. However, Russian authorities say psychiatric information on the assailant is being sought, suggesting they believe the claim by ISIS may be opportunistic.

Updated at 4:53 p.m. ET

A small number of right-wing "Free Speech Rally" demonstrators disbanded early from Boston Common after they were confronted by thousands of counterprotesters shouting anti-Nazi and anti-KKK slogans.

Deborah Becker, a reporter with member station WBUR in Boston, said that "a few dozen" rally attendees were escorted from Parkman Bandstand by police and placed into police vehicles "for their own safety."

A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee was removed from the entrance to Duke University Chapel early Saturday by order of the university president who said in a letter that the move was not only a safety measure but also meant to express the "abiding values" of the school.

The decision to remove the statue from the Durham, N.C., campus, comes after it was defaced on Wednesday and follows violent clashes last week in Charlottesville, Va., between right-wing extremists and counterprotesters over plans to remove another statue of Lee.

Update at 12:30 p.m. ET

Spanish authorities say they have dismantled a terror cell of mostly Moroccan natives that is believed to be responsible for vehicle attacks in Barcelona and Cambrils that killed 14 people and hurt more than 100 others.

But a manhunt continues for the alleged driver of a van used in the main attack on pedestrians on Thursday in Barcelona. Two other suspects are believed to be at large.

"The cell has been completely dismantled in Barcelona," Spanish Interior Minister Juan Ignacio Zoido said at a news conference on Saturday.

Former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Michael Mullen is warning that tensions with North Korea could easily get "out of control" and blames President Trump's harsh rhetoric for narrowing options.

Speaking on NBC's Meet the Press, Mullen was asked whether the president's bellicose comments on North Korea had made the situation worse.

"It eliminates maneuver space for him because it looks like brinkmanship to me," said Mullen, a retired admiral.

Updated at 3:15 p.m. ET

A day after a rally of white nationalists turned violent in Charlottesville, Va., Gov. Terry McAuliffe said there is "no place" for such hateful people in the United States as he called on President Trump to more strongly condemn the perpetrators.

Updated 10 p.m. ET

President Trump says he is "not going to rule out" military action against Venezuela following President Nicolas Maduro's moves to consolidate power in recent weeks.

"The people are suffering and they are dying. We have many options for Venezuela including a possible military option if necessary," Trump told reporters.

Venezuela's defense minister responded Friday evening that such talk is "craziness."

India has increased a military alert along its eastern border with China, moving troops and weapons into the region amid a weeks-long standoff between the two countries that shows no signs of resolution.

As NPR's Julie McCarthy reported last month, New Delhi and Beijing have been at odds over a strategic region called the Doklam Plateau, which is claimed both by China and by India's tiny ally, Bhutan.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai cancelled a company-wide Town Hall that had been organized after an employee was fired for writing a memo that criticized the tech-giant's diversity efforts.

In an email to employees, Pichai said some questions that had been pre-submitted via Google's moderating software "appeared externally this afternoon and on some websites Googlers are now being named personally."

The year 2016 was the warmest on record for the planet as a whole, surpassing temperature records that date back 137 years, according to an annual report compiled by scientists around the globe.

For global temperatures, last year surpassed the previous record-holder: 2015.

A dispute over election results in Kenya that has pitted supporters of incumbent President Uhuru Kenyatta against his rival, Raila Odinga, intensified on Thursday, with the opposition presenting what it says is evidence of tampering with the electronic voting system.

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

President Trump is doubling down on his incendiary rhetoric aimed at North Korea, saying on Thursday that his promise earlier in the week to meet Pyongyang's threats with "fire and fury" might have been too soft.

Scores of migrants were forced overboard by smugglers off the coast of Yemen — the second such incident in as many days. Up to 180 people were forced off a boat Thursday and at least five have drowned and 50 are still missing, according to the International Organization for Migration.

"We have the five bodies for sure ... but we believe that there are certainly more than 50 who are still in the sea," Laurent de Boeck, the IOM's chief of mission in Yemen, told The Associated Press.

Franklin, the fifth tropical storm to form in the Atlantic so far this year, has intensified into the first hurricane of the season as it prepares to make landfall on Mexico's Gulf Coast.

The storm, with winds of about 85 mph, was moving west at about 13 mph. It is expected to make landfall Wednesday night north of Veracruz.

Updated at 8:58 p.m. ET

The U.S. State Department says it expelled two Cuban diplomats earlier this year after several Americans at the U.S. Embassy in Havana experienced strange medical symptoms and were either recalled to the U.S. or allowed to come home.

State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said the "incidents" were first discovered in late 2016, but she declined to provide any details.

North Korea said it would finalize plans for missile launches near Guam by the middle of this month and then wait for a green light from leader Kim Jong Un before carrying them out.

The statement, disseminated by state-run news agency KCNA, comes amid an increasingly tense tit-for-tat between Pyongyang and Washington, as well as reports that U.S. intelligence has determined that North Korea can now fix nuclear warheads onto its ballistic missiles, including an ICBM thought capable of reaching the United States.

A lifeguard who sued a New Jersey beach municipality for age discrimination after he was fired at age 52 has won a nearly $130,000 jury award.

Paul McCracken was sacked in June 2011 by Ocean City, N.J., after the physical requirements for the job were raised in what he alleged was an effort to force out older lifeguards.

McCracken said in the suit, which was filed in 2013, that he had passed the requalification fitness test but narrowly failed the tougher swimming test.

When it comes to astronomical events, this year's annual Perseid meteor shower is in serious danger of being, shall we say, eclipsed.

With most of the ballots counted in Kenya's election, President Uhuru Kenyatta has taken a wide lead over opposition leader Raila Odinga.

Odinga on Tuesday rejected the results displayed by the election commission, saying, "They are fictitious, they are fake."

The commission's website showed Kenyatta with about 55 percent of the vote and Odinga with 44 percent after votes were counted in two-thirds of the 40,833 polling stations.

U.S. intelligence analysts say North Korea has developed a warhead that fits on its ballistic missiles, including an intercontinental ballistic missile capable of reaching U.S. territory, according to The Washington Post.

Updated at 8:05 p.m. ET

President Trump on Tuesday threatened to meet North Korea with "fire and fury" a day after Pyongyang said it was ready with "ultimate measures" in response to new U.N. sanctions pushed by Washington.

"North Korea best not make any more threats to the United States," the president warned at a meeting on the opioid crisis held at Bedminster, N.J., where he is on an extended working vacation.

Hackers in Venezuela attacked numerous government websites in protest of the "dictatorship" of President Nicolas Maduro.

A group calling itself "The Binary Guardians" said it hacked about 40 government sites, according to Reuters.

"Our intention is to give hope to people that no matter how strong the enemy seems, there is strength in unity," the group wrote in an email quoted by the news agency.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has proposed spending $275 million to upgrade defenses against an invading force. The enemy? A fish. Specifically, Asian carp that are threatening to break through to the Great Lakes.

Three Boy Scouts have died after a sailboat they were aboard struck a low-hanging power line on a lake east of Dallas, Texas, over the weekend.

The Scouts were sailing in a Hobie Cat on the Lake O' the Pines when the catamaran's mast snagged the transmission cable.

Think of the swastika and chances are that what comes to mind is the murderous regime of Adolf Hitler's Nazi Germany.

But the symbol is at least 5,000 years old and is incorporated into Hindu, Buddhist and Jain iconography. Even today, in the Indian subcontinent and parts of Southeast Asia it is not uncommon to see the symbol painted on buildings and vehicles as a sign of good fortune.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

A federal appeals court has thrown out the murder conviction of an ex-Blackwater security guard and ordered three others to be resentenced in connection with the 2007 massacre of 14 unarmed Iraqi civilians in Baghdad. The high-profile incident called into question the role played by U.S. security contractors in Iraq.

It was not so much skywriting as it was skydoodling.

To pass the time during a routine test flight, a team of Boeing pilots used their own flightpath to draw a giant outline of the very plane they were flying — a 787-8 Dreamliner. The picture they sketched stretched over 22 U.S. states and took 18 hours of flight time to complete.

"The nose is pointing at the Puget Sound region, home to Boeing Commercial Airplanes," the aircraft maker said in a statement.

The U.S. economy created an estimated 209,000 jobs in July, representing a modest slowdown from the previous month but coming in better than many economists had expected. The unemployment rate ticked down to 4.3 percent from 4.4 percent.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics said in its monthly report that, statistically, July showed little change from previous months, as the number of unemployed persons remained around 7 million.

Authorities in Dubai say they have put out a multistory blaze that engulfed one of the world's tallest residential skyscrapers shortly after midnight, affecting more than 40 floors.

Dubai Police and Civil Defense quickly evacuated the structure, and firefighters brought the flames under control within about two hours, officials of the United Arab Emirates said. There were no reports of serious injuries, though a few people were treated for smoke inhalation.

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