Patty Satalia

Senior Producer / Host

Patty Satalia is a senior producer/host for WPSU-TV and FM.  Prior to joining Penn State Public Broadcasting in 1987, she worked in commercial television in Pittsburgh, first as a film editor and fill-in capsule news anchor for WPGH-TV, and later, for WPTT-TV as public affairs director and co-host of the talk-show, People, Places and Things. In her more than 26 years at WPSU, Patty has conducted more than 5,600 interviews and has hosted a variety of programs, including Take Note, which aired on TV for more than 35 years, and on radio for more than 14 years.  She also hosted the magazine show, Pennsylvania Inside Out, and the Lobby Talk series, which was recorded before a live audience in the lobby of the Outreach Building.  For eight seasons, Patty produced the Emmy award-winning game show, The Pennsylvania Game, as well as a number of award-winning documentaries, including: Children and Autism: Time is Brain; Creating Health: Childhood Obesity: and Farming from the Heart, to name a few. She is currently co-producer/host of the half-hour public affairs program, Conversations from Penn State, and a reporter for WPSU-FM.  

Patty graduated from Indiana University of Pennsylvania in 1980.  She and her husband, Ed Satalia, a building contractor, have two grown sons. 

Ways to Connect

Pennsylvania’s primary is April 26th. WPSU is talking with the Democratic candidates vying for a primary win and a chance to take Republican Sen. Pat Toomey's U.S. Senate seat. Who are the candidates and what do they stand for? We’ll talk with all of the candidates. This week our guest is Braddock Mayor John Fetterman.

Katie McGinty
Katie McGinty

Pennsylvania’s primary is April 26th.   Four Democratic candidates are vying for a primary win and a chance to take Republican Senator Pat Toomey's U.S. Senate seat. Who are the candidates and what do they stand for? We’ll talk with all four candidates. This week our guest is former secretary of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection under Governor Ed Rendell, Katie McGinty.

Admiral Joe Sestak
JoeSestak.com

Pennsylvania’s primary is April 26th.   Four Democratic candidates are vying for a primary win and a chance to take Republican Senator Pat Toomey's U.S. Senate seat. Who are the candidates and what do they stand for? We’ll talk with all four candidates. This week our guest is retired 3-star Admiral and former U.S. Congressman Joe Sestak, who ran against Senator Toomey in 2010 and lost by a slim margin. 

About half of America’s farmland is planted with genetically engineered crops—principally corn, cotton and soybeans. Genetic engineering allows scientists to change the genes in some farm animals and food crops to make them grow faster or bigger and be more resistant to bugs, weeds and disease. Proponents say the technique holds the key to feeding an ever-increasing population in the most environmentally conservative way. Opponents say the science of biotechnology is moving too quickly with neither adequate study nor precaution and that we tinker with nature at our own peril.

If you think heroin isn’t a concern in your community, think again. Experts now say every community in Pennsylvania has a heroin problem.  Pennsylvania now ranks 3rd in the nation for heroin use and 7th for overdose deaths. What’s behind these alarming statistics—and why are only a fraction of those who need treatment getting it? WPSU's Patty Satalia talks with psychiatrist Timothy Derstine, medical director of SunPointe Health Medication Assisted Treatment program.  Unlike many treatment programs, his requires psychosocial therapy in addition to prescribing medication.

Edible waterbug on plate
Sevda Eris / KQED

Montana State University Professor Florence Dunkle has been an entomologist for nearly 50 years. But it wasn’t until a trip to Rwanda in 1985 that she began studying insects for their nutritional value. Now one of the world’s leading entomophagists, she warns against unsustainable food practices and the detrimental effects of Western cultural bias.  She also champions the low-cost, high-protein benefits of eating insects.

Since the United Nations Volunteers program began in 1971, more than 50,000 volunteers have been mobilized around the world. Volunteers help organize and run local and national elections and support a large number of peacekeeping and humanitarian projects.  What does it take to become a volunteer—and are volunteers making a real difference?  WPSU's Patty Satalia talks about that and more with Jennifer Stapper, Communications Chief for the United Nations Volunteers program.

According to the Treatment Advocacy Center, more individuals with mental illness are in America’s jails and prisons than in residential mental health care facilities.  Many are  there for nonviolent offenses.  Why is the criminal justice system becoming our de facto mental health care provider?  And how can we improve the outcomes when law enforcement and other first responders encounter individuals with mental illness who are in crisis?  Tracy Small answers those questions and more.  She's program coordinator of the Crisis Intervention Team, or CIT, for the Centre Region.

Americans of all stripes increasingly say our political system is in a state of crisis.  They point to intense partisanship, lack of civility, and the inability of government to get things done.  Just how dire are things?  How did we get into this fix?  More importantly, what can we do about it?  Christopher Beem, the managing director of the McCourtney Institute for Democracy at Penn State, and the author of "Democratic Humility," says part of the problem is that we are all hardwired with "confirmation bias," and that we are too quick to reject any information that goes against our belief

Why can it be so difficult to get kids to behave?  Our guest has the answer to that question, and advice on rediscovering the joy of parenting.  Amy McCready is the Founder of Positive Parenting Solutions and the author of “If I Have to Tell You One More Time...The Revolutionary Program That Gets Your Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling.”  She’s also a Penn State graduate.

Dr. Patricia Jabbeh Wesley is a gifted poet, scholar, public speaker and human rights activist.  Her powerful poems are a tribute to the dead and an appeal to the living. Wesley teaches English and Creative Writing at Penn State-Altoona and is the author of four widely acclaimed volumes of poetry.  We talked with her about surviving Liberia's civil war and her new memoir, about how education saved her, and about going home.

Sandra Fluke was a third-year law student at Georgetown University in 2012, when she was invited by Democrats to speak at Congress’ contraceptive mandates hearing.  Conservative talk-show host Rush Limbaugh stunned the country when he called her a "slut" and a "prostitute" because of her testimony.   In 2014, she narrowly lost her bid for a state senate seat in California.

In his latest work, renowned photographer and researcher Richard Ross opens our eyes to the harsh realities of America's juvenile justice system.  

For his book, “Juvenile In Justice,” Ross photographed and interviewed more than a thousand youths over a five-year period in juvenile detention facilities around the country.  The result is powerful and haunting. 

A distinguished professor of art at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Ross has received numerous grants and awards and his works have been exhibited in museums worldwide.  

If you’re like most people, you’ve given only limited thought to the fluoride in your tap water.  That is, unless you live in Bellefonte, where the issue is now being hotly debated.  The Bellefonte Water Authority has voted to end the practice; some area dentists and residents want the authority to reconsider and continue to add fluoride to the water system.  Why is this long-standing practice still so controversial?  What are the benefits—and risks—of fluoridating drinking water?  WPSU's Patty Satalia talks about that with Dr.

panelists on stage
WPSU

Prostate cancer is one of the two most common cancers among men– one in seven males will be diagnosed within their lifetime. Despite its prevalence, treatment options vary widely based on the particulars of each case. How do you know what’s right for you?  

Farnoosh Torabi is an award-winning personal finance expert, TV personality and best-selling author.  She’s also a Penn State graduate and Schreyer Honors Scholar.  WPSU's Patty Satalia talks with her about her money philosophy, about having it all, but not doing it all, and about what it really means when she makes more than him.

As longtime Centre County Court of Common Pleas Judge Bradley Lunsford prepares to retire, two State College attorneys have been selected to run for the open ten-year-term on the bench. Republican Ron McLaughlin and Democrat Katie Oliver will appear on the November 3rd ballot with precious little time to campaign. WPSU's Patty Satalia talks with both candidates.  McLaughlin is a shareholder in the State College law firm Stover McLaughlin; Oliver is a shareholder in the State College law firm McQuaide Blasko.

This past August, President Obama announced his Clean Power Plan. It’s the first-ever national standards to limit carbon pollution from power plants, the largest source of carbon emissions in the U.S. What does this mean for Pennsylvania?  What role will the public play in crafting PA’s plan?   DEP’s Secretary John Quigley is our guest. 

  Joe Valente is a self-identified superhero; he’s using the proverbial pen to fight the good fight by spreading a simple message: deaf people are not disabled. Valente is an Assistant Professor of Early Childhood Education at Penn State and co-Director of Penn State’s Center for Disability Studies. Deaf since infancy, he was “mainstreamed” as a child and didn't have the opportunity to spend time with deaf peers, which is why he finds his research work with schools for the deaf so fulfilling.

As a young bi-racial violinist, Aaron Dworkin knew first hand how little diversity existed in the concert hall. In 1996, during his senior year of college, he established the Sphinx Organization to address the stark under-representation of people of color in classical music. Each year, Sphinx awards more than one million dollars in prizes and scholarships, impacting the lives of more than a hundred thousand students.

Getting through the physical and emotional hurdles of cancer is hard enough--but then there’s the financial burden.  The Bob Perks Cancer Assistance Fund was started in 2006 to help local cancer patients struggling to pay their bills during their treatment. The fund has distributed more than $1 million dollars and lightened the load for more than 1,000 local families battling cancer in Blair, Centre, Clearfield and Huntingdon Counties.  To find our more, we’ve asked Doreen Perks to join us.  She started the Fund in honor of her late husband. 

In the United States, about 33 percent of young adults earn a 4-year college degree by age 27. The push in recent few years has centered around encouraging every young person in America to go to college as the pathway to the middle class.  But some experts say we place too much emphasis on a college education and that career and technical schools provide another pathway to success.  Patty Satalia talks about that with Dr. David Passmore, a distinguished professor of Workforce Education and Development at Penn State, and Dr.

High on the list of collaborations that have to work if a film is to be successful is that of director and cinematographer.  It’s the lucky director who finds the perfect partner to realize his ideas visually - through color, composition, lighting and camera movement.  We talked with two young filmmakers who made it work.  Josef Wladyka is the director of “Manos Sucias”, a film that won him the Best New Narrative Director award at last year’s Tribeca Film Festival.  And Alan Blanco is the man who shot it.  Alan graduated from Penn State in 2005 with a degree in film and video.

Paula Kerger is president and CEO of PBS.  She's been included on the Hollywood Reporters Women in Entertainment Power 100 List for the past eight years.  We talked with her about the latest developments at PBS, about the importance of the PBS mission in our communities, and about PBS after Downton Abbey.

Cathy Willis Spraetz is President & CEO of Chimp Haven, the National Chimpanzee Sanctuary in Keithville, Louisiana. We talked with her about our long history of exploitation of chimpanzees, about major changes in the use of chimpanzees in biomedical research, and about why these great apes, who have given so much to humans, deserve to retire in comfort and freedom. 

HEAR MORE OF THIS INTERVIEW:

The Canadian author Margaret Atwood is considered to be one of the most important and influential writers alive today. She has more than 50 books to her credit, including poetry, short stories, children’s fiction, and 14 novels. The best known works are The Handmaid’s Tale and The Blind Assassin. We'll talk with her about her life as a writer, the difference between speculative fiction and science fiction, and about the manuscript she wrote for the Future Library Project; readers won't see the book for 100 years!  

This past March, Take Note went on the road, to Penn State's HUB Robeson Center's Freeman Auditorium, to talk with New York Times' bestselling author, Jess Walter.  His 2012 masterpiece Beautiful Ruins was this year's Centre County Reads selection.  NPR's Fresh Air called the book "A literary miracle." Salon called it "Damn near perfect."

You may not know the name Alan Blanco, but something tells me you soon will!  This young filmmaker and Penn State graduate is making a name for himself.  His debut feature film, Manos Sucias, with first-time director Josef Wladyka has made the film festival rounds to critical acclaim.  Blanco co-wrote and shot the film, which was executive produced by Spike Lee. The deeply affecting story is set, and shot, in a part of the world we rarely see on screen: the drug underworld of Buenaventura, Columbia. 

LINKS WITH MORE INFORMATION ABOUT ALAN BLANCO:

Ai-Jen Poo is interested in the work that makes all other work possible.   We’re talking about nannies, housekeepers and caregivers for the elderly who go into other people’s homes every day to make it possible for them to go out into the world and do what they do.  Her goal is to bring dignity and respect to that work.  Poo is director of the National Domestic Workers Alliance and co-director of Caring Across Generations. Her new book is The Age of Dignity: Preparing for the Elder Boom in a Changing America

Megan Maas is a certified sexuality educator and doctoral student at Penn State. Her research ranges from sexual socialization to teen dating violence prevention to adolescent pornography use. She works with parents, teachers, and other education professionals to help them navigate the changing landscape of sexual health and culture among teens and young adults.

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