Lindsay Lazarski

Keystone Crossroads Multimedia Producer

Lindsay Lazarski is a photojournalist and multimedia producer for Keystone Crossroads, a statewide public media initiative focused on problems and solutions facing Pennsylvania's cities.

Before joining the Keystone Crossroads collaboration, Lindsay produced daily and feature multimedia content for WHYY's NewsWorks and was founder and editor of View Finders blog

Lindsay has dangled from the back of a musher’s dog sled, climbed six feet under into a Bucks County bomb shelter and strutted up Broad Street on New Year's Day with the Mummers — all in search of a better angle. 

Before becoming a "real Philadelphian," Lindsay worked as a multimedia producer for NBC in New York and is a recovering South Bronx public school teacher.

 

Erie, Pennsylvania has public schools that have been underfunded for years. And today, the school district is in a dire situation. Erie’s story raises broader questions about education equality, and to what extent kids can be successful when they go to schools with limited resources. In this episode, you’ll hear from a range of people — including parents, teachers, students, and school officials — about what the impact has been.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

This past weekend, President Donald Trump marked his 100 days in office at a rally in Harrisburg. As part of our occasional series, "I Voted Trump," Keystone Crossroads checked in with Trump supporters across the state to see whether their views have changed.

Daphne Goggins is a mother, grandmother, community activist, and an avid social media user. She often posts updates about President Donald Trump to her followers on Facebook.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

 

 

When playing the slots in Pennsylvania, casinos and gamblers aren't the only ones making money.

The state collects 54 cents for every dollar a player loses in a slot machine.

The state uses most of that money, about 34 cents, for reducing property taxes. The state's horse racing industry gets 11 cents and 5 cents goes to a state economic development trust fund. The remaining 4 cents is split among the communities that host the casino.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

 

Santiago

On this episode of Grapple, we’ll talk about immigration and our country’s changing demographics with journalist Maria Hinojosa. We’ll also hear from University of Pennsylvania political scientist Dan Hopkins about what contributes to the rise of anti-immigration politics and how it played out in the 2016 presidential election.

LISTEN HERE

Jessica Kourkounis / Keystone Crossroads

Episode 09 of Grapple takes you to Hazelwood. It’s a neighborhood in Southeast Pittsburgh that’s only four miles from downtown but hard to get to by public transportation. Besides feeling physically isolated from the rest of the city, residents in Hazelwood have watched other neighborhoods redevelop and cash in on Pittsburgh’s renaissance. But a big change is finally underway in Hazelwood, where a former coke and steel mill site is being turned into a huge site for tech research, commercial use and housing.

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Gentrification is a controversial issue playing out in cities across America. What happens when wealthier residents begin to move into a lower-income neighborhood? Who gets to stay, and who doesn’t? In episode 09 of Grapple, we heard about how the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Hazelwood is on the cusp of change. Residents there are hopeful about a major new development and the potential job opportunities; but they’re also concerned the development could push them out of their community.

Is the American Dream still possible? In this episode, we’ll talk with leading American political scientist Robert Putnam about why he thinks the American Dream is in crisis. In his most recent work, Putnam examines our nation’s growing income inequality and opportunity gap compared to the 1950s when he was a kid in an Ohio town along Lake Erie. Putnam is a political scientist at Harvard University and the author of the best-seller, “Bowling Alone.”

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At Keystone Crossroads' inaugural Urban Ideas Worth Stealing conference, civic leaders shared some of the innovative projects cities have taken on in recent years.

Jeffery Parks, founder of Steel Stacks, told the story of reimagining the defunct Bethlehem Steel site into the Lehigh Valley's premiere arts and music venue.

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

 

Pennsylvania cities have transformed vacant lots into community gardens and urban farms. Pittsburgh has considered building tiny house communities. But what about using abandoned lots for urban earthships?

Lindsay Lazarski / WHYY

  Michael Catania walks on a rocky beach at Petty's Island. He picks up a flat stone and flings it out into the Delaware River. The stone skips a few times toward a shipping terminal and the church steeples of Philadelphia's Port Richmond neighborhood.

"I feel like a little boy when I come here," said Catania, chairman of the New Jersey Natural Lands Trust.

Wooden stakes protrude from the ground. The remains of an old pier line the perimeter of the beach. Plastic bottles, old tires, a TV, and bricks sliced in half — one side "key," the other "stone," litter the shoreline.

AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Registered voters head to the polls on Tuesday to cast their ballots for Pennsylvania governor, U.S. Representative, State Senator, State Representative and local referendums. Catch up on who is running in your district and other essential information about Election Day 2014.

Back to basics

If you are a registered voter, but unsure of where to cast your vote, find your polling place by punching your address into the Pennsylvania Department of State database.