Emily Reddy

News Director

Emily Reddy is the news director at WPSU-FM. You can hear her feature stories during Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Emily also serves as the lead producer of WPSU’s radio series This I Believe, BookMark, and StoryCorps. She sometimes fills in as an on-air host.

Her radio work has been recognized with multiple awards from the Public Radio News Directors Association, Inc. (PRNDI) and the Pennsylvania Associated Press Broadcasters Association.

Before coming to WPSU, Emily anchored the evening news and reported for WMNF in Tampa, Florida. She also served as a general reporter in Washington D.C. for WAMU and as capitol correspondent for WNPR.

While in graduate school, Emily produced segments for the daily news magazine Here & Now out of WBUR in Boston. She earned her B.A. in comparative literature from Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Florida and her M.S. in broadcast journalism from Boston University.

Ways to Connect

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

Penn State professor Alex Hristov
Emily Reddy / WPSU

It’s feeding time at an experimental dairy barn not far from Beaver stadium. A big square machine on wheels spits a pile of hay in front of each cow on one side of the barn, and lab assistant Chan Hee Lee pours a bucket of dried green leaf bits on top.

As the feeding machine finishes up and rolls out of the barn, Alex Hristov says they tried a lot of things before they found oregano reduced cows’ methane output.

“We started with essential oils,” Hristov said. “Lavender, mint. Citrus, onion, anything, you name it.

So why is Hristov focused on cutting methane?

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