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A German nurse serving a life sentence for murdering two patients is suspected of killing another 97 people by lethal injection.

If convicted, Niels Högel would become Germany's most deadly serial killer ever.

Högel, now 41, was charged with 97 further counts of murder on Monday. His third trial in the northern city of Oldenburg, Germany, is expected to start later this year, according to Reuters.

Vice President Pence says the United States will open an embassy in Jerusalem by the end of 2019 — much more quickly than initially promised.

Pence announced the new timetable in a speech before the Knesset, Israel's parliament, drawing a standing ovation from Israeli lawmakers and accelerating one of the Trump administration's most contentious foreign policy decisions to date.

Having earned a spot Sunday on the U.S. Ski Team, Gus Kenworthy is the second openly gay man who will compete for the United States at the Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea.

Kenworthy, 26, placed second at the final Olympic qualifier for freeski slopestyle, according to NBC.

Facebook is doing some soul-searching.

In a new commentary, the social media giant acknowledges the possibility that social media can have negative ramifications for democracy. This comes after repeated criticism that it didn't do enough to prevent the spread of fake news that had the potential to impact the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

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With guest host Jane Clayson.

Psychologist Enrico Gnaulati is on a mission: to save talk therapy. His new book explores the ways, as the subtitle says, “health insurers, big Pharma, and slanted science are ruining good mental health care.”

This show airs Monday at 11 a.m. EST.

The town of Norwich, Vermont, has put an athlete on every U.S. Winter Olympic team but one since 1984.

Four new flavors of Diet Coke are going on sale this week as Coca-Cola tries to attract young people and former customers to the brand.

NPR's Visuals Team, specifically the Video team, had a formidable showing at the White House News Photographers Association's "2018 Eyes of History: Multimedia Contest" over the weekend. According to the association's website, "The Eyes of History contests are held annually to select the best in visual journalism across still, video, and multimedia disciplines."

The NPR Visuals team racked up a total of 12 awards across the nine categories.

Three key board members at USA Gymnastics have resigned, the organization said Monday. The moves indicate continued tumult at the sport's governing body as the sentencing hearing continues for former team doctor Larry Nassar, who has admitted to the sexual assault of minors under his care.

Content advisory: The video below contains strong language and may be offensive to some.


Thousands of people took to the streets this past Saturday in the second Women's March on Washington, a nationwide event that marked the anniversary of President Trump's first year in office. Like last year, the marches were dotted with celebrities, including pop singer Halsey in New York City.

With the Winter Olympics only weeks away, excitement is mounting for participating athletes. But that joy has been marred by recent tragedies. French skier and Olympic hopeful David Poisson was killed at the Nakiska ski area in Alberta, Canada, in mid-November after crashing through a safety barrier and hitting a tree. Weeks later, German skier Max Burkhart was also killed in Alberta, competing at the Nor-Am Cup.

The accidents, and others, leave some asking whether the risks of some winter sports are at best unreasonable and at worst immoral.

For more than two months, starlings have been flocking to Ireland's County Cork in increasing numbers — and so have the birdwatchers hoping to catch a glimpse.

Those observers caught a showstopper of a performance earlier this month.

Caught in a renewed firestorm of controversy, Pope Francis apologized for remarks he made last week defending a Chilean bishop accused of covering up decades of sexual abuse. But the pontiff held fast in his support of the bishop, maintaining his innocence.

Efforts to make a show of North Korean and South Korean unity at the next Olympics are drawing a backlash in South Korea. In Seoul, protesters Monday set fire to the North Korean flag and a photo of Kim Jong Un. The South Korean president's approval rating has dropped in recent days as well.

"We oppose, we oppose, we oppose," shouted demonstrators at Seoul Station, the rail and subway station in the center of the capital. They showed up to confront a North Korean advance team that had arrived to scout out Olympic venues.

In the depths of World War II, Swedish authorities decided their citizens needed to know what to do if the fighting finally arrived on their doorstep. Though they maintained neutrality, it was hard to believe they could continue to do so — especially as, one by one, their Nordic neighbors got caught in the tides of violence.

So they decided on a handy pamphlet, delivered to households across Sweden. Roughly translated to "If War Comes," the pamphlets offered tips for how to interpret sirens and what to take along in the case of evacuation.

Back in 2012, Cameron Osteen, better known to the music world under the moniker Cam O'bi, quit his boring job at Kohl's in Las Vegas to pursue music full time. He knew one person who owned a studio in Chicago, so he moved there.

"I was living at the studio, sleeping under the console sometimes," O'bi tells NPR. "There would be a lot of people coming through the studio and I would sell beats for people here and there. It would be all cash, like a barbershop."

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If you've seen the 1945 film noir Mildred Pierce or the 2011 HBO miniseries of the same name (both made from James M. Cain's novel), you know that story punishes Mildred for being a working mother: Her marriage breaks up, her younger daughter takes ill and dies and her elder daughter ,Vida, turns out to be a murderer — all because Mildred wasn't in the home 24/7 to oversee things.

Leaders in Washington continue negotiations to end a partial government shutdown, and they're getting their own messages out about how we got here. As NPR's Ron Elving writes, each party is accusing the other of being out of touch with Americans — and they're both probably right.

So we asked you what you want them to know.

Songs We Love: Reyna Tropical, 'Niña'

Jan 22, 2018

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