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A five-alarm fire created some dramatic moments in Houston on Tuesday.

One video of a construction worker fleeing the apartment complex that was still under construction is just stunning. There's no need to say more. Just watch:

If you want background on the fire, The Houston Chronicle has details.

On a day when three of President Obama's Secret Service agents were put on leave for "disciplinary reasons," the agency came under scrutiny in the U.S. Supreme Court for a separate incident.

The court heard arguments in a case testing whether Secret Service agents can be sued for moving a group of protesters out of earshot of President George W. Bush in 2004.

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This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

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A few years ago, celebrity chef Jamie Oliver kicked up a foodie firestorm when he told the audience at the Late Show with David Letterman that vanilla ice cream contains flavoring from a beaver's ... um, derriere.

"Beaver anal gland — yes," Oliver shouted bluntly, as the crowd booed and hissed. "Oh, come on! You're telling me you don't like a little beaver? ... It's in cheap sorts of strawberry syrups and vanilla ice cream."

When Facebook purchases a company, you can often hear a collective groan go around the Internet — "There goes the neighborhood."

We're just five days away from the March 31 deadline to sign up for individual health insurance under the Affordable Care Act. For weeks, administration officials, including the president, have insisted that there would be no extensions to the scheduled end of the six-month open enrollment period.

But now there's some wiggle room. Let's review, shall we?

Start with the key question: Is Monday still the deadline?

The head of the Egyptian military, Field Marshal Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, says that he has resigned as defense minister and will run for president in elections expected in July.

He made the announcement in a nationally televised speech.

The Associated Press reports:

"Wearing military fatigues, he said it was the last time he would wear it and that "I give up the uniform to defend the nation" and run in elections expected next month.

A regional director of the National Labor Relations Board ruled that Northwestern University athletes are employees of the school and are allowed to form a union.

The Associated Press calls the decision "stunning" because it has the potential to completely upend the way college athletics function. The AP adds:

"The Evanston, Ill-based university argued college athletes, as students, don't fit in the same category as factory workers, truck drivers and other unionized workers. The school plans to appeal to labor authorities in Washington, D.C.

Scientists have spotted a new dwarf planet at the edge of our solar system. It's a kind of pink ice ball that's way out there, far beyond Pluto.

Astronomers used to think this region of space was a no man's land. But the new findings suggest that it holds many small worlds — and there are even hints of an unseen planet bigger than Earth.

Imagine an America that has been plagued for years by a mysterious epidemic of insomnia — an affliction so serious that many are dying from lack of sleep. That's the futuristic premise of Karen Russell's new novella, Sleep Donation.

Here's an old joke you may have heard: "How many Vietnam vets does it take to screw in a light bulb?" Answer: "You wouldn't know, you weren't there."

President Obama meets Pope Francis at the Vatican on Thursday, the 30th anniversary of formal relations between Washington and the Holy See, and against a backdrop of a sometimes turbulent history in U.S.-Vatican ties.

The first high-level bilateral contact was in 1788, as the Vatican foreign minister recalled recently. Speaking in a large renaissance hall, Archbishop Dominique Mamberti said President George Washington, through his envoy Benjamin Franklin, informed the Vatican that it did not need to seek authorization from the U.S. for the appointment of bishops.

The world has a new epidemic on its hand: drug-resistant tuberculosis.

We're not talking about the kind of TB that doctors can cure with a few weeks of standard antibiotics.

Searchers in Washington are using bulldozers and bare hands to work their way through debris at the scene of Saturday's mudslide near the tiny community of Oso. At least 24 people are believed to have died.

Games like Flappy Bird and Candy Crush have helped many of us de-stress during long waits at the doctor's office and crowded Metro rides. But what if an app could actually help with mental health?

Researchers from Hunter College and the City University of New York say they've developed an app that can reduce anxiety.

There's just something oddly appropriate about this photo from East Lansing, Mich., after a winter that's been so hard for so many people across the nation.

Hospital-acquired infections continue to be a big problem in health care, with 4 percent of patients getting a new infection while hospitalized, a study finds. And 11 percent of those infections turn deadly.

It's the first time that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has attempted to catalog all hospital infections, not just the infections with germs on their watch list. Researchers surveyed 183 hospitals nationwide, emphasizing smaller community hospitals.

The pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline warned consumers that some lots of alli, its over-the-counter weight loss drug, appear to have been tampered with after people reported finding the wrong pills in bottles.

The bogus pills were found in bottles bought in Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi, New York, North Carolina and Texas, GlaxoSmithKline reported on Wednesday.

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Walter Mosley's writing inspired Hollywood filmmakers and a generation of black writers. He's now being honored at the National Black Writers' Conference. He talks about the award and his new book.

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I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. It's the college admissions season. So this spring, we're joining our colleagues at Morning Edition to talk about the challenge of paying for higher education. And we're not just talking about the problem, though, we're trying to offer practical advice to get around that money maze. Today we want to focus on historically black colleges and universities - HBCUs.

Many colleges and universities use race as a factor in admissions, but the approach has been a hot-button issue for decades — even making its way to the Supreme Court several times since the late 1970s.

Osama bin Laden's son-in-law was found guilty Wednesday of conspiring to kill Americans by serving as a spokesman for al-Qaida following the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

The verdict in Manhattan federal court ended a three-week trial in which Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, 48, was portrayed as a reluctant operative who had no prior knowledge of the attacks.

The Kuwait-born Abu Ghaith, a onetime imam, faces life in prison.

The more than $40 million he allowed to be spent on renovations at his residence and allegations that he lied about some of his other lavish spending have now officially cost the "bishop of bling" his job.

The Vatican announced Wednesday that it has accepted the resignation of Franz-Peter Tebartz-van Elst, who had been the bishop of Limburg, Germany. He will be assigned other duties.

One of the upsides to the seemingly endless winter of 2014 was that you had time to think.

And to ask futuristic questions, such as: What will the American Winter of 2114 be like?

Here are some of the answers.

This post has been updated with word that the aerial search is over for today.

Images taken on Sunday by a French satellite show 122 "potential objects" in the area of the southern Indian Ocean that searchers are now combing for any sign of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, Malaysia's acting transport minister said Wednesday.

This post is being updated. Click here to jump to our latest additions.

Weary searchers resumed their dangerous work Wednesday near Oso, Wash., where it's thought at least 25 people — and possibly many more — died when a massive mudslide buried dozens of homes and businesses on Saturday.

Headlines and news outlets' updates helped tell the story as the day began:

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