NPR News

Greetings and welcome to NPR Ed's weekly roundup of education news from Washington and around the country.

Supreme Court hears a voucher-related case

It's prom season at Eagle High School in suburban Boise, where seniors are plotting for their futures and grown ups are dispensing life advice. Today's lesson in Jeff Clifford's American government class is courtesy of their congressman, Republican Raul Labrador.

"The relationships that really matter in life — whether you're a teacher, whether you're a professional, whether you're a politician — are those people that are with you before you become somebody," he says.

There's a running joke in Maringouin, Louisiana, a town of 1,100, that everyone is related. It's funny because, as people in Maringouin will tell you, it's true. Everyone calls each other 'cuz' or 'cousin,' and they mean it. People run into each other on the street, recognize a last name, start talking about people they know in common, then discover they're related.

For a long time, no one knew exactly why. It wasn't like there was a founding family that had moved there.

The Republican chairman and the top Democrat on the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee are taking a look into the slowly brewing controversy of foreign cash flowing into President Trump's hotel in Washington, D.C.

Record Store Day, which celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, is a consumer ploy in the guise of a cultural event. Or, depending on your vantage, maybe it's the other way around. Whatever the case, record stores across the country and around the world are happily (or gamely) bracing for impact: Record Store Day 2017 falls this Saturday, April 22, with a wave of exclusive releases, in-store appearances and other retail enticements.

Imagine city planning as a contact sport and you have the gist of Matt Tyrnauer's documentary, Citizen Jane: Battle for the City. The film chronicles the struggle between two mid-20th century worldviews: that of Robert Moses, who preached a cure for what ailed American cities that amounted to "bulldoze and replace," and the less destructive prescriptions of writer/activist Jane Jacobs, who challenged the whole notion of urban renewal in her game-changing book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

Video of a murder uploaded to Facebook this week upset many users, especially since it took Facebook two hours to take it down. But the incident illustrates a dilemma for the company as it becomes an open platform for both recorded and livestreamed video.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg was contrite about the incident when he appeared on stage at the company's F8 developer's conference.

Not all of April's showers are soggy and flower-inducing. Late April is also the season of the Lyrids, the second of the year's established meteor showers. So get thee to the rooftops and wide open fields: The shower peaks tonight.

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U.K. May Have 24 Hours Without Coal Power

Apr 21, 2017

The United Kingdom may be in its first full day without coal power in more than a century, its National Grid announced Friday.

"It looks likely that today will be the first ever working day in Britain without #coal since the industrial revolution!" the agency tweeted.

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Digital Industrial Revolution.

About Marco Annunziata's TED Talk

GE's Chief Economist Marco Annunziata is optimistic about "the marriage of minds and machines" — provided we manage it the right way.

About Marco Annunziata

A police officer is dead and two others seriously wounded after a shooting Thursday in Paris that’s been claimed by ISIS. The attack comes just as voters in France get ready to head to the polls Sunday to elect their next president.

Juana Molina Shares Eerie New Video For Upcoming Album, 'Halo'

Apr 21, 2017

Argentine experimental artist Juana Molina's music is a beautiful and strange creature in a category of its own, and no genre, Latin or otherwise, can adequately categorize its alluring ambiguity.

What do you want to know about world hunger?

One thing we do know is that more than 20 million people are now at risk of starvation and famine. The United Nations is calling it the biggest humanitarian crisis since the U.N. was founded in 1945. Conflict and drought are blamed for the looming crisis in four countries in Africa and the Middle East: Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia and northeast Nigeria.

A wrong-way Armada and tough talk on North Korea. Georgia runoff. Bill O’Reilly’s future. Turkey’s more powerful president. Our weekly news roundtable goes behind the headlines.

Guests

David Haynes, editorial page editor for the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel. (@DavidDHaynes)

Kendrick Lamar has spoken. In his first interview since the debut of his (soon-to-be) chart-topping cultural phenomenon-of-an-album, DAMN., the rapper sat down for the now-requisite interview with Zane Lowe of Apple's Beats 1 Radio.

If, like so much of the general listening public, you have found yourself grappling with the themes and depth of his mystical masterpiece since its release one week ago today, you should find solace in the fact that this is exactly as Lamar intended.

Scientists plan to march in hundreds of cities across the country on Saturday, and hold a major rally in Washington, D.C. Many of them say they are concerned about the future of science under President Trump, who has appointed climate-change skeptics to key positions in his administration and proposed cuts to basic science research in his budget.

Both the U.S. and Uganda have called off the search for notorious warlord Joseph Kony and his followers, the Lord's Resistance Army, saying that Kony's power has dwindled to the point that he's no longer a threat.

The group carried out brutal murders, rapes and mutilations, and was known for kidnapping children and forcing them to become soldiers. Uganda has been battling Kony and his followers for decades, and U.S. Special Operations forces joined the search for the warlord in 2011.

A viral video in 2012 brought Kony international infamy.

Sometimes, it's the Internet of stings.

Juicero, a startup that sells a pricey juice press, found that out firsthand. The company's Wi-Fi-enabled machine produces cold-pressed juice out of packets sold exclusively to owners via subscription.

Where does a foodie find food on the road? Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst drove from coast to coast on her way back to her home in New England, and discovered lots of great restaurants along the way. She shares some of her finds with Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson. You can also check out Kathy’s Instagram for more photos from the trip.

A new study has found an association between frequent drinking of diet sodas and an increased risk of both stroke and dementia.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with Dr. Matthew Pase, the study’s lead author and a neurologist at the Boston University School of Medicine, about what it means for the average soda drinker.

Comedy Series 'Girlboss' Hits Netflix Today

Apr 21, 2017

“Girlboss,” a new comedy series, is streaming on Netflix on Friday. The show is inspired by the memoir of the same name by American businesswoman Sophia Amoruso, the founder of the women’s clothing retailer Nasty Gal.

Here & Now‘s Meghna Chakrabarti speaks with NPR TV critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans) about the show.

Updated at 7:15 p.m. ET.

The U.S. Justice Department has escalated its approach to so-called sanctuary cities, writing at least eight jurisdictions Friday to put them on notice they could be failing to cooperate with immigration authorities.

Alan Hanson, the acting assistant attorney general for the Justice Department's grant-making arm, warned the cities that they're required to submit proof that they comply with federal immigration law.

When U.S. intelligence agencies spy on Americans, they're supposed to get a warrant. But what happens when they're spying on a foreigner and an American calls up?

The way intelligence agencies handle what they call this "incidental" collection of information — and what political leaders eventually do with it — will be a big part of the next phase in Congress' investigations about the Russian interference in last year's presidential election.

A Brutal Crackdown On Gay Men In Chechnya

Apr 21, 2017

Chechen officials are carrying out a campaign of violence against gay men. Those who’ve escaped say they were beaten and tortured by authorities, and forced to reveal the names of their gay friends. Police and government officials have also encouraged so-called “honor killings” by outing gay men to their families.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks with Rachel Denber (@Rachel_Denber) of Human Rights Watch about the violence.

A study in San Antonio is designed to determine if a technique called Family Nurture Intervention could help babies who spend their first days in the neonatal intensive care unit.

The technique coaches new mothers to develop physical and emotional bonds with their babies. Researchers believe it may prevent developmental, learning or behavior problems, including autism.

Becky G From the Block

Apr 21, 2017

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