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Natalie Prass On Mountain Stage

1 hour ago

While she was born in Cleveland, this Mountain Stage concert was Natalie Prass' first time performing her own music in her home state of Ohio.

Prass' new album, The Future And The Past, was recorded in her current hometown of Richmond with producer and collaborator Matthew E. White and released by ATO Records. Coincidentally, the recording console used at White's Spacebomb studio, came from Ohio where it had been used to record the Ohio Players, among others.

Come Halloween there's usually one question that's top of mind: Trick or treat? But each year the devoted researchers at Chapman University dig deeper than that when they set out to discover what really haunts people's night-scapes and what sorts of things make us afraid of what may be lurking in the closet, hiding under the bed, or breathing (heavily) at the other end of the ringing telephone line?

Academy Award winner Kobe Bryant was dropped as a jury member from the Animation Is Film festival in Los Angeles this weekend after backlash stemming from past sexual assault allegations against him.

The former NBA-phenom won an Oscar earlier this year for his animated short-film Dear Basketball, but under pressure from a group calling itself Women and Allies, festival organizers announced on Wednesday that Bryant would no longer participate in the second annual event.

Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst is celebrating pear season with recipes for poached pears, pear cake and pear salad. She brings samples for host Robin Young to taste.


Apples get all the attention this time of year. But pears are their sophisticated autumn cousin. Pears have a lot to offer: They boast a sweet, earthy flavor, have fiber and vitamin C, are fat- and cholesterol-free and each is only about 100 calories.

The Washington Post has published the last column Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi wrote before he disappeared on Oct. 2 after entering the Saudi Arabian Consulate in Istanbul.

"We held on to this column he filed the day before he entered the consulate in the hopes that we could edit it with him, as we normally did," Fred Hiatt, who runs the Post's Opinions section, told NPR.

Sears And The Future Of American Malls

5 hours ago

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What Percent Minority Can You Claim?

5 hours ago

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On Thursday, Californians took part in an annual statewide earthquake preparedness event called The Great Shake Out. The event encouraged people to practice safety drills, check quake supplies and go over emergency plans with family, schools and employers.

While many Californians now know the mantra to "drop, cover and hold on," there's growing concern that people and companies are not adequately covered for the days after.

With Meghna Chakrabarti

The new movie “First Man” puts the Apollo 11 moon landing on the big screen. But what was Neil Armstrong, the man who took that giant leap, really like? We’ll ask NASA historian and Armstrong biographer, James Hansen.

Guests

Alissa Wilkinson, film critic for Vox. (@alissamarie)

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said it has received reports of more than 100 new cases of a polio-like condition called acute flaccid myelitis, or AFM.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks with Helen Branswell (@helenbranswell), STAT’s infectious diseases and public health reporter.

The "whistling" of the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica's largest, is beautifully eerie. It's also potentially a divining rod for changes to shelves' composition that can be monitored in real time.

Trauma is not neat and pretty to deal with; it is not easily diagnosed, it does not vanish on its own, and its lingering effects can touch those around us. In the latest sequel to the long and winding Halloween series, trauma plays an important role in the narrative arc of famed final girl Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis). You might remember her from the original 1978 John Carpenter film, which saw her screaming, running, discovering her friends brutally murdered, then fending off a serial killer to protect the kids she was babysitting.

'Tis the season, in movie-world, to run the family-dysfunction tape on a loop. If you tire easily of snickering variants on Home For the Holidays, let me recommend What They Had, a finely textured family drama deceptively wrapped in that overworked subgenre. I doubt writer-director Elizabeth Chomko even thought of building her impressive debut feature around the reductive term "dysfunction," a noxiously bullying word that feeds the fantasy of a smoothly operative family somewhere out there in Perfectsville, where none of us lives.

We are living in an age where wildfires have become such a destructive physical force that they've lost some of their potency as metaphors. It's tough to watch thousands of actual homes be destroyed in California while thinking instead of the symbolic burning inside ourselves. Wildlife, an intimate new family drama set in 1960 and based on a 1990 novel by Richard Ford, feels like a relic in the sense that it deals with domestic upheaval behind picket fences, and could have been made a half-century ago by Douglas Sirk.

Beating Bollywood

5 hours ago

India's population is 1.3 billion. So it only makes sense that American streaming giants Amazon and Netflix would want to get into the market. After all, that big number represents a lot of potential customers to binge watch your content. The move seems simple, right? Both companies have already figured out successful, international strategies. But so far, success in India has proved elusive. Sally Herships identifies three key strategies that may help.

The first step - understanding the market.

The nastiness of American politics today may seem extreme compared to the tone of earlier eras. But historian David Moss says our nation's founders were also happy to sling mud.

Empress Of Pivots From 'Me' To 'Us'

5 hours ago

When Lorely Rodriguez first shared her music with the world, she did it anonymously. The East L.A. native uploaded short snippets of experimental pop to YouTube under the name Empress Of. Those demos turned into a record deal and a debut album in 2015 titled Me; on her new record, it's all about Us.

In the political world, the term "astroturfing" refers to a protest movement that's made to appear like an organic expression of grassroots anger, but reveals itself to be bankrolled by deep-pocketed organizations. (It's derived from AstroTurf, the synthetic carpeting that stands in for natural grass in some sporting venues.) Though the term has been abused by partisans and conspiracists inclined to slag political adversaries as paid protestors, it's still an evocative shorthand for faux-authenticity, the "fuzzy concrete" that stands in for the brilliant green emerging from the soil.

You know about A Star Is Born, right? One enormously famous and successful celebrity fades; one rises. But here's a question: What percentage of creative people will ever get to be either of those? What percentage will experience a great rise or a great fall? How many will simply work, often undervalued and insulted, sometimes praised, for a moment, before being shoved aside? What about the invisibility that follows even fleeting encounters with modest success?

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In TV commercials and on debate stages across America, the attacks are now blistering as candidates see Election Day coming up fast.

(SOUNDBITE OF MONTAGE)

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"Thank YOU," writes Cara Christensen, a first-grade teacher in Washington state who read NPR's deep dive into the troubled Public Service Loan Forgiveness program (PSLF). The reporting, she says, "made me feel not so alone."

We received dozens of emails, tweets and Facebook comments from aggrieved borrowers responding to news that, over the past year, 99 percent of applications for the popular loan-forgiveness program have been denied.

Especially as the midterm elections approach, there's an unavoidable stream of news about politics in crisis: words like "polarization" and "tribalism" paint a portrait of voters retreating intransigently to their respective corners (or, more accurately, social media bubbles).

A new poll gives a clearer picture of what that "tribalism" looks like: Americans differ not just on their ideology or political team, but on the issues they view as problems.

Pew presented registered voters with 18 issues, asking those voters how big of a problem each issue is.

Brock Long was frustrated. Yet again, the FEMA administrator said, people in the path of a powerful hurricane had ignored evacuation orders.

Hurricane Michael had leveled the small Florida city of Mexico Beach and destroyed large parts of nearby Panama City. The death count was rising as search and rescue workers pulled bodies from the rubble.

In Japan, the springtime bloom of cherry blossoms is an annual rite of celebration, accompanied by picnics and parties under the flowering canopy.

But this week, an odd thing happened: Some of the trees bloomed again. In autumn.

Updated at 6 p.m. ET

President Trump intervened in a big federal building project to help protect business for his hotel on Pennsylvania Avenue, a group of House Democrats alleged on Thursday.

Trump wants to demolish and rebuild the FBI's headquarters, the Democrats say, to preserve the site's government ownership and deny any potential competitors to the Trump International Hotel at the Old Post Office Pavilion up the street.

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