Matt Rourke / Associated Press

Pa. State Senate Residency Fight Drags Out Tension Of Election


HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — For the Pennsylvania Senate, the election didn't necessarily end at 8:00 p.m. on November 6.
The chamber's Republican majority is questioning the residency qualifications of a newly elected Democrat who flipped a Republican-held Pittsburgh-area seat by a mere 793 votes, injecting tension into a normally quiet December between legislative sessions.
A vote against seating Democrat Lindsey Williams could turn swearing-in day on January 1 — normally a...

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This I Believe: I Believe In Second Impressions

Apr 14, 2011

I was just shy of 17 the first time my brother Daniel introduced me to his girlfriend. Her name was Kristen, and I hated her immediately. But my brother loved her. Granted, I may not have known what love was, but in my teenage years, love meant a brother who would rather be with his girlfriend than with his siblings. Call it what you want *cough* jealously *cough*, but I wasn’t happy.

This I Believe: I Believe Life Should Be "Pun"derful

Mar 24, 2011

One morning, I called the local barbershop to make an appointment. Unfortunately, the barber was all booked up for the day. 

"Well, this is a hairy situation," I said to my girlfriend as I hung up the phone. She replied, "They certainly left you stranded." 

Call me a pundit, a glutton for punishment, or just a "pun"derful guy…I believe in puns. 

You want to spice up any conversation, here's some sage advice. Have a little fun with it. That's why it's called a “play on words” after all. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011
Essayist Lyndsie Wszola.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal.  

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

Penn State professor Alex Hristov
Emily Reddy / WPSU

It’s feeding time at an experimental dairy barn not far from Beaver stadium. A big square machine on wheels spits a pile of hay in front of each cow on one side of the barn, and lab assistant Chan Hee Lee pours a bucket of dried green leaf bits on top.

As the feeding machine finishes up and rolls out of the barn, Alex Hristov says they tried a lot of things before they found oregano reduced cows’ methane output.

“We started with essential oils,” Hristov said. “Lavender, mint. Citrus, onion, anything, you name it.

So why is Hristov focused on cutting methane?

This I Believe: I Believe In Remembering

Aug 12, 2010

I sometimes forget I have an older sister. She passed away before I was born, but that doesn't mean I don't have a sister. I didn't know about her until I was 12 years old. But now I think of her often.

Shortly before we moved to the United States from Kirgizstan, on New Year’s Day, my dad pulled me aside and told me we had to go visit a “special little person.” My dad took a deep breath and told me about the short life of my older sister.

This I Believe: I Believe In Heavy Metal

Mar 11, 2010

I believe heavy metal.
 
When I was 12 years old I saw Metallica’s music video for the song, “One.” The video mixes gritty black and white band footage with excerpts from the film Johnny Got His Gun about a hospitalized soldier who lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and speech to a landmine. Over this footage, “One” goes from lament to unstoppable barrage.
 
I believed this song.
 

This I Believe: I Believe In Making The Bed

Dec 24, 2009

When I was growing up, I fought constantly with my parents over making my bed in the morning. An after-breakfast check-in was routine at my house. My mom or dad would walk down the hall, check each room, and call from upstairs, "Stop whatever it is you're doing and come make your bed." It was a chore that I simply did NOT like, and so I avoided it. I thought it was absurd to make my bed every morning. It was counterproductive. What could be the benefit of straightening a bed in the morning that would inevitably be undone that evening? This puzzled me for a long time.

This I Believe: I Believe In Caring

Dec 10, 2009

Just a few years ago I was a stereotypical teenager. Everything was about "me." I wasn't interested in anyone else or their needs. I often neglected my family because time with my friends seemed more important. Family dinners were a burden and vacations a punishment.

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

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NPR Stories

Given the rivalries and violence that divide the global community today, it is hard to imagine that on December 10, 1948, the nations of the world approved, almost unanimously, a detailed list of fundamental rights that every human on the planet should enjoy.

The men and women from eight African countries packed into a rubber raft late last month and set off from the Libyan city of Sabratha in the hope of crossing the Mediterranean to reach Italy.

But powerful sea winds blew them off course. They drifted at sea for 10 days before their boat ended up back in Libyan waters and capsized off the coast of Misrata.

At least 12 died. Libyan authorities managed to rescue 10.

NPR is doing an ongoing series of stories about the troubled TEACH Grant program.

If you're one of the thousands of teachers who had grants converted to loans even though you were meeting the teaching requirements of the program — we want to hear from you.

There is now a fix underway to help teachers who lost their grants. If you can document that you are meeting or have met the teaching requirements of the program, the Department of Education says it will change your loans back to grants.

The French government is hoping Saturday's "yellow vest" protests were the last. The movement, named for the fluorescent safety vests worn by demonstrators, is not only the country's biggest social and political crisis in 50 years, but, according to many analysts, a very threat to French democracy. Prime Minister Edouard Philippe has called for national unity and said, "It's time to stop the fighting and begin the dialogue."

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Supreme Court Declines Key Planned Parenthood Case

Updated at 11:56 a.m. ET The U.S. Supreme Court declined to take a case with big potential implications for women's health care and Planned Parenthood related to whether states can block people from using Medicaid for health care services at Planned Parenthood and similar organizations. The result is that people can continue to use Medicaid money for pregnancy-related Planned Parenthood services. Now, this is not for abortion -related services. Federal law prohibits people to use Medicaid...

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All The Criminal Charges To Emerge So Far From Robert Mueller's Investigation

The longer special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election has gone on, the more President Trump has railed against it. Since the investigation began in May 2017, the president has taken to Twitter and dismissed it as a "witch hunt" more than 125 times. That criticism aside, the special counsel investigation has resulted in criminal counts against more than 30 people and three Russian entities. And while the final outcome of the Mueller probe...

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How 1 Company Pulls Carbon From The Air, Aiming To Avert A Climate Catastrophe

At a major climate meeting in Poland, nearly 200 countries are trying to reach a deal on dramatically reducing carbon emissions. But a recent U.N. report found that may not be enough to avoid dangerous impacts from the warming climate. In fact, the world is falling so far short of what's needed, it said, that it may be necessary to pull massive amounts of carbon dioxide out of the air. The problem is that there's no feasible — let alone economical — way to do that yet. But there are a number...

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For One Rural Community, Fighting Addiction Started With Recruiting The Right Doctor

Lindsay Bunker woke up from a nightmare. The 32-year-old lives with her sixth-month-old daughter on the Lac Courte Oreilles Indian Reservation in northern Wisconsin. She's struggled with addiction for over 10 years, mostly to heroin. Then came the nightmare: She dreamt two men were attacking her baby while she could think only about drugs. "In my mind I was thinking, 'If I can just get one hit, if I can get one line, I can save her,'" she recalls, pausing before continuing, "I woke up and I...

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'Absolutely Brutal': Why White House Runs Aren't For Everyone

Few things in life are more personal or emotional than the death of a parent. For the family of George H.W. Bush this past week, that experience was fodder for wall-to-wall TV news coverage and the front page of every newspaper. As the patriarch of the Bush family was laid to rest, the ceremonies served as a glaring example of how the families of presidents — and presidential candidates — sign away their privacy at the start of a campaign. It's a trade-off that dozens of Democrats are...

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Slave Bible From The 1800s Omitted Key Passages That Could Incite Rebellion

On display now at the Museum of the Bible in Washington, D.C., is a special exhibit centered on a rare Bible from the 1800s that was used by British missionaries to convert and educate slaves. What's notable about this Bible is not just its rarity, but its content, or rather the lack of content. It excludes any portion of text that might inspire rebellion or liberation. Anthony Schmidt, associate curator of Bible and Religion in America at the museum, says the first instance of this abridged...

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Exercise Wins: Fit Seniors Can Have Hearts That Look 30 Years Younger

We know we need to exercise for our health, but a lifelong exercise habit may also help us feel younger and stay stronger well into our senior years. In fact, people in their 70s who have been exercising regularly for decades seem to have put a brake on the aging process, maintaining the heart, lung and muscle fitness of healthy people at least 30 years younger. Take 74-year-old Susan Magrath, a retired nurse practitioner who lives in Muncie, Ind. Magrath has been running almost daily for 45...

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How A Shorter Sea Ice Season Is Changing Life In The Arctic

People who live in the town of Utqiaġvik have seen dramatic effects of climate change during their lifetimes. Utqiaġvik, formerly known as Barrow, sits right on the edge of the Arctic Ocean at the very top of Alaska. It's the northernmost town in the United States, and home to about 4,400. The coastline here used to be edged with sea ice for nearly the whole year. But that period is getting shorter and shorter, and as a result Utqiaġvik locals are dealing with coastal erosion and are changing...

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Chief Of Staff John Kelly To Leave White House At The End Of The Year

Updated at 1:36 p.m. ET White House chief of staff John Kelly will leave "toward the end of the year," President Trump said Saturday. It is the latest administration shake-up as Trump makes adjustments following the recent midterm elections. "John Kelly will be leaving — I don't know if I can say 'retiring.' But, he's a great guy," Trump told reporters on the South Lawn of the White House. Trump did not announce who would replace Kelly but said that would come in a day or two. Kelly took over...

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China Launches Probe Bound For A Historic Exploration Of The Far Side Of The Moon

A Chinese spacecraft is headed toward the moon on a historic mission. The rocket, launched Saturday, is carrying a probe set to make the first-ever soft landing on the far side of the moon, reports China's state-run Xinhua News Agency. While other spacecraft have previously explored the far side of the moon from afar , the soft-landing will allow for more detailed study of the lunar surface. The probe is expected to touch down in early January . If you're tempted to make a Pink Floyd joke,...

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What You Need To Know About The New Manafort And Cohen Court Documents

Two of Donald Trump's former top aides are looking at years in federal prison — and Trump and his camp allegedly are connected to many of the crimes in which they've been charged. Those were among the big takeaways from the release of court documents on Friday evening in a pair of cases that have ensnared Trump's former longtime personal lawyer and the veteran political pro who ran his presidential campaign for a time in 2016. The former, Michael Cohen, has been cooperating with federal...

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Voting By Mail Is On The Rise, But Could Alleged N.C. Election Fraud Change That?

When it comes to election fraud, the "voting twice by dressing up with a different hat" tactic that President Trump talks about almost never happens. What actually does happen, as allegedly illustrated in the race for North Carolina's 9th Congressional District, is vote-by-mail fraud. "The consensus, among people who study fraud carefully, is that voting by mail is a much more fertile area for fraud than voting in person," said Charles Stewart, who studies election technology and...

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What The Ebbs And Flows Of The KKK Can Tell Us About White Supremacy Today

As long as the United States has existed, there's been some version of white supremacy. But over the centuries, the way white supremacy manifests has changed with the times. This includes multiple iterations of the infamous Ku Klux Klan. According to the sociologist Kathleen Blee , the Klan first surfaced in large numbers in the 1860s in the aftermath of the Civil War, then again in the 1920s, and yet again during the civil rights era. Blee is a professor and dean at the University of...

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Sunday Puzzle: Familiar Phrases

On-air challenge: Every answer today is a familiar three-word phrase or title in which the first and last words are the same. I'll give you the middle word (and a clue, if necessary). You tell me the phrase. Ex. AFTER — Repeatedly -- TIME AFTER TIME 1. THINGS — Phrase suggesting priority 2. SWEET — What you say after returning from a long trip 3. AGAINST — Not give up despite impossible odds 4. SAY — Don't give up, there's always a possibility 5. BABY — Catchphrase said by Sarah Palin at the...

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Novelist And 'Book Matchmaker' Tayari Jones Shares Her Favorite Books Of 2018

Tayari Jones says there are two things to consider as a book matchmaker: "You have to match what you think your friend would like to read, with what you think your friend should read — and you have to make a Venn diagram of that," she says. Ahead of the holidays this year, All Things Considered is inviting writers to talk about the books they'll be gifting to friends and family. Here's the list that Jones, author of An American Marriage , has compiled for her loved ones. For more reading...

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NPR's Book Concierge: Our Guide To 2018's Great Reads

The Book Concierge is back! Explore more than 300 standout titles picked by NPR staff and critics. Open the app now! Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

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Stream NPR Music's 50 Best Albums Of 2018

Start with the top, if you must: Janelle Monáe 's human and heroic Dirty Computer is our No. 1 album of 2018 after all. But then we recommend hitting shuffle on this 40-hour playlist of the 50 best albums of the year and seeing where it takes you. Where else could you jump from Monáe's funk to the limitless sounds of Mexican vocalist Magos Herrera to Khruangbin 's instrumental chill to The HIRS Collective 's punk chaos to a true communion of Bartók 's violin concertos? For every Vince Staples...

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