Death Toll In California Wildfires Climbs To At Least 31

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET Wildfires continued to tear through Northern and Southern California on Monday, where firefighters were at the mercy of dry air and whipping winds fanning the deadly blazes. At least 31 people have died statewide; more than 200 remain unaccounted for. Authorities in Northern California said six more bodies were found in the scorched path of what officials call the Camp Fire, which earlier was blamed for 23 deaths. Two people have been reported dead in a fire zone of...

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This I Believe: I Believe Life Should Be "Pun"derful

Mar 24, 2011

One morning, I called the local barbershop to make an appointment. Unfortunately, the barber was all booked up for the day. 

"Well, this is a hairy situation," I said to my girlfriend as I hung up the phone. She replied, "They certainly left you stranded." 

Call me a pundit, a glutton for punishment, or just a "pun"derful guy…I believe in puns. 

You want to spice up any conversation, here's some sage advice. Have a little fun with it. That's why it's called a “play on words” after all. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011
Essayist Lyndsie Wszola.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal.  

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

Penn State professor Alex Hristov
Emily Reddy / WPSU

It’s feeding time at an experimental dairy barn not far from Beaver stadium. A big square machine on wheels spits a pile of hay in front of each cow on one side of the barn, and lab assistant Chan Hee Lee pours a bucket of dried green leaf bits on top.

As the feeding machine finishes up and rolls out of the barn, Alex Hristov says they tried a lot of things before they found oregano reduced cows’ methane output.

“We started with essential oils,” Hristov said. “Lavender, mint. Citrus, onion, anything, you name it.

So why is Hristov focused on cutting methane?

This I Believe: I Believe In Remembering

Aug 12, 2010

I sometimes forget I have an older sister. She passed away before I was born, but that doesn't mean I don't have a sister. I didn't know about her until I was 12 years old. But now I think of her often.

Shortly before we moved to the United States from Kirgizstan, on New Year’s Day, my dad pulled me aside and told me we had to go visit a “special little person.” My dad took a deep breath and told me about the short life of my older sister.

This I Believe: I Believe In Heavy Metal

Mar 11, 2010

I believe heavy metal.
 
When I was 12 years old I saw Metallica’s music video for the song, “One.” The video mixes gritty black and white band footage with excerpts from the film Johnny Got His Gun about a hospitalized soldier who lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and speech to a landmine. Over this footage, “One” goes from lament to unstoppable barrage.
 
I believed this song.
 

This I Believe: I Believe In Making The Bed

Dec 24, 2009

When I was growing up, I fought constantly with my parents over making my bed in the morning. An after-breakfast check-in was routine at my house. My mom or dad would walk down the hall, check each room, and call from upstairs, "Stop whatever it is you're doing and come make your bed." It was a chore that I simply did NOT like, and so I avoided it. I thought it was absurd to make my bed every morning. It was counterproductive. What could be the benefit of straightening a bed in the morning that would inevitably be undone that evening? This puzzled me for a long time.

This I Believe: I Believe In Caring

Dec 10, 2009

Just a few years ago I was a stereotypical teenager. Everything was about "me." I wasn't interested in anyone else or their needs. I often neglected my family because time with my friends seemed more important. Family dinners were a burden and vacations a punishment.

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

This I Believe: I Believe In Public Radio

Apr 2, 2009

For many people, April 15 is TAX DAY! April 15 for me, however, has a different significance…

In 1982, I moved to a small mountain town in Colorado. I thought I’d found the perfect place to live. But there was one thing missing. No public radio. I used to spin the FM dial searching for the voice of the community.  All I would hear was canned music or talk programs packaged somewhere far away and made local only by the commercials injected.

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A 50-year-old farm supervisor has been accused of intentionally planting needles in Australian strawberries, and could spend up to 10 years in prison if convicted.

In September, the repeated discovery of needles stuck inside grocery store strawberries prompted widespread alarm, caused farmers to dump massive quantities and triggered a nationwide investigation.

Portrayal of Guilt exists in the extremes of hardcore, noise, grindcore, death metal, powerviolence and turn-of-the-century screamo — subgenres of heavy music that typically scream through the pain. On its debut album, the Austin band doesn't just want you to scream, but also to Let Pain Be Your Guide.

Thanksgiving is quickly approaching, and we want to hear from you.

NPR's Morning Edition wants to know what about America you are most thankful for. From your responses, poet and author Kwame Alexander will create a new poem. You can share your thoughts below or here.

What about America are you thankful for this Thanksgiving?

The story of Bernie and the Believers is the most powerful I've ever come across at the Tiny Desk. It's about a beautiful act of compassion that ultimately led to this performance, and left me and my coworkers in tears.

You've likely heard the idea that sitting is the new smoking.

Compared with 1960, workers in the U.S. burn about 140 fewer calories, on average, per day due to our sedentary office jobs. And, while it's true that sitting for prolonged periods is bad for your health, the good news is that we can offset the damage by adding more physical activity to our days.

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After NRA Mocks Doctors, Physicians Reply: 'This Is Our Lane'

Note: This story includes graphic imagery and language. A mocking tweet from the National Rifle Association has stirred many physicians to post on social media about their tragically frequent experiences treating patients in the aftermath of gun violence. "Someone should tell self-important anti-gun doctors to stay in their lane," the NRA tweeted on Thursday. "Half of the articles in Annals of Internal Medicine are pushing for gun control. Most upsetting, however, the medical community seems...

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World Leaders Warn Against Nationalism At World War I Remembrance Ceremony

At a ceremony in Paris on Sunday to commemorate the end of World War I, world leaders made impassioned pleas for global cooperation, with several making forceful denouncements against rising forces of nationalism. In a speech at the Arc de Triomphe, French President Emmanuel Macron took aim at the style of nationalism that has been embraced by President Trump, warning a crowd of dignitaries and heads of state about how the splintering of multilateral institutions led to the first World War...

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Death Toll In California Wildfires Climbs To At Least 31

Updated at 10:20 a.m. ET Wildfires continued to tear through Northern and Southern California on Monday, where firefighters were at the mercy of dry air and whipping winds fanning the deadly blazes. At least 31 people have died statewide; more than 200 remain unaccounted for. Authorities in Northern California said six more bodies were found in the scorched path of what officials call the Camp Fire, which earlier was blamed for 23 deaths. Two people have been reported dead in a fire zone of...

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Trump's Meeting In Paris To Commemorate End Of World War I Starts With A Spat

President Trump met with his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron on Saturday — a visit that began with a spat as dozens of leaders came together to commemorate the centennial anniversary of World War I's end and all that has since been built between nations in a multilateral world. Just minutes after touching down in Paris on Friday night, Trump tweeted harsh words. "President Macron of France has just suggested that Europe build its own military in order to protect itself from the U.S., China...

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Reporting On Mass Shootings: A Familiar Heartbreaking Script

This past week there was yet another tragic mass shooting , this time at the Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Twelve people were killed before the gunman fatally turned the gun on himself. It's an all too common scene. According to the Gun Violence Archive , which defines mass shootings as an incident in which four or more people are killed or injured, there was one almost every day of the past two weeks, another just Saturday in Tennessee. And as journalists, we are now...

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10 Notable People Leaving Congress

The next Congress is going to be missing some familiar faces. Thanks to a mix of retirements and defeats on Tuesday, some high-profile lawmakers will soon be exiting Capitol Hill. Some were longtime Democratic targets in the Senate that the GOP finally vanquished. Others were vocal Republican critics of President Trump who chose not to run for re-election. Others simply thought it was time to hang it up — including the outgoing speaker of the House, Paul Ryan (R-Wis.). Here are 10 of the most...

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Florida Elections For Governor And U.S. Senate Heading For Recount

Updated at 4:05 p.m. ET Two top elections in Florida are heading for recounts, with voters almost evenly divided on candidates in the state's races for governor and the U.S. Senate. Unofficial vote tallies from all of Florida's 67 counties were turned in at noon on Saturday, and the narrow vote margins triggered machine recounts, which must be completed by Thursday. The most acrimonious of the elections may be the U.S. Senate race between Republican Gov. Rick Scott and incumbent Democrat Bill...

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Dan Crenshaw Mocks Pete Davidson And Robert De Niro Returns As Mueller On 'SNL'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EGy-xpK-1mw https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yw5JkXSm74Y https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4b6ttHSgIFM https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GKaakjMVtyE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YEmeXsknE4 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bPpcfH_HHH8 Saturday Night Live packed in a couple of special appearances from unexpected guests, including Robert De Niro and Rep.-elect Dan Crenshaw. Here's brief roundup of the show's political bits this week: The show opened by bidding adieu...

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To Decrease Bird Kills, Cat Lovers Team Up With Bird Lovers In D.C. Cat Count

There is a long-simmering, often overheated debate among animal lovers. It pits cat lovers, who want to help feral cats survive outdoors, against bird lovers, who say cats are causing bird populations to plummet. It's team cat vs. team bird, and it can get ugly online, with terms like "fake news" and "alternative facts" bandied about in blog posts . But on a recent morning, members of those two opposing camps were working together, navigating a densely forested part of Rock Creek Park in...

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The American Academy Of Pediatrics On Spanking Children: Don't Do It, Ever.

Twenty years after urging caution among parents who choose to discipline their children with spankings, the American Academy of Pediatrics has updated its stance. Now, its overwhelming consensus for parents: do not do it. In a new policy statement issued earlier this month, the group warns that "Aversive disciplinary strategies, including all forms of corporal punishment and yelling at or shaming children, are minimally effective in the short-term and not effective in the long-term. With new...

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Former Attorney General Says Whitaker Appointment 'Confounds Me'

The former attorney general under President George W. Bush is voicing doubt about whether President Trump has the authority to appoint Matthew Whitaker as acting attorney general, saying there are "legitimate questions" about whether the selection can stand without Senate confirmation. In an interview with NPR, Alberto Gonzales, who served as attorney general from 2005 to 2007, also said that critical comments made by Whitaker about Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in...

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Clinics That Provide Abortions Anxious After An Uptick In Threats Of Violence

Abortion providers around the country are on edge after a woman convicted of attempting to murder a doctor who performed abortions was released from federal custody on November 7. In 1993, Rachelle Shannon traveled from Oregon to Wichita, Kan., where she shot Dr. George Tiller and wounded him. Tiller recovered from that attack, but was murdered many years later by another anti-abortion extremist. Now, both Shannon's release and the current political climate have many clinics stepping up...

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'Farming While Black': A Guide To Finding Power And Dignity Through Food

Leah Penniman was told she wasn't welcome, from her first day in a conservative, almost all-white kindergarten. "I remember this one girl teasing me and saying brownies aren't allowed in this school ... and that really continued, that type of teasing," she recalls. "Every time I walked into an honors classroom, they would ask me if I was in the right room," she says. She enjoyed learning and did well, but she also found solace in the natural world. "No one taught me what African traditional...

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'City Of Ash And Red' Will Pull You Into Its Nightmare

I enjoy books that live between categories, the platypuses of the bookstore, and City of Ash and Red is that type of book. Classified as a thriller, it could also appeal to literary readers or speculative fiction fans. Whatever shelf you want to put it on, it's an anxious nightmare of a novel. I made the mistake of reading this while on a trip to Boston, which either made things worse or was just the perfect moment to tackle it, seeing as the book begins with a man on a journey to a country...

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Michelle Obama Tells The Story Of 'Becoming' Herself — And The Struggle To Hang On

In her new book, Becoming , former first lady Michelle Obama writes about the profound frustration of being misunderstood — of being pegged as an "angry black woman." She writes about the discomfort of being a hyperaccomplished woman only recognized through her connection to a powerful man. She writes about the power in telling one's own story, on one's own terms. So it's perhaps a cruel irony that the first headlines about Obama's book have been about her anger at Trump. And that's because...

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