Florence, Now A Hurricane, Is One Of Many Threats To The Atlantic And Pacific

Updated at 12:45 a.m. ET on Monday A slew of dangerous storms – hurricanes, tropical storms and a typhoon — are on the move and threatening life and property in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The National Hurricane Center has issued advisories for the Atlantic on Hurricane Florence, and two tropical storms, Helene and Isaac. The NHC has also issued an advisory for the Eastern Pacific on Tropical Storm Paul, and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center has issued advisories for Hurricane...

Read More

Looking for an older WPSU's Story Corps interview? Find them among our story archives.

State College Homeless Shelter
Kate Lao Shaffner

Yesterday, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked to folks with Centre County's Out of the Cold and Hearts for the Homeless programs, which seek to provide respite for the homeless during the winter months. Here's the second part of the series, about the broader issues of homelessness in the Centre region.

Whitney Hunsinger is sitting in the living room of Centre House, a homeless shelter in downtown State College. Her daughters, who are two and four, are coloring and watching TV. Hunsinger is nine months pregnant.

Yesterday, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reported on Centre County's Out of the Cold and Hearts for the Homeless programs. Today, we'll hear about the year-round reality of homelessness in State College, a town where many might assume homelessness isn't a concern.

Cot with quilt
Kate Lao Shaffner

For many of our listeners, the worst thing a colder-than-usual winter can bring is a higher heating bill.  But for the homeless, the frigid temperatures could be a matter of life and death.  How do Centre County residents who don’t have a home get out of the cold?

For many of our listeners, the worst a colder-than-usual winter can bring is an expensive heating bill. But for the homeless, the frigid temperatures could be a matter of life or death. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talks with Centre County residents about how those without homes get out of the cold.  

John Gaudlip in front of field with sprinklers.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

    

This week WPSU is taking a look at water issues in central Pennsylvania. Today, WPSU’s Emily Reddy explores the massive task of supplying and cleaning the water used by students, faculty, staff and visitors at Penn State University. 

Hearts for the Homeless, a drop-in day center located in downtown State College, opened its doors for the first time yesterday. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports.  

I was born weighing 2 pounds and 4 ounces. I was small, even for a newborn in a big world. While in the womb, the doctor gave my brother and me a low chance of survival because the umbilical cord was struggling to support us both. Despite this, we were born with no severe handicaps. By the time I was nine, however, I realized I was different from other kids my age.

At school, while other kids talked and played, I stayed at my desk. I struggled to understand what was being taught, and I was too afraid to ask for help. My mom wondered if something was wrong with me.

Joel Rubin is the Director of Policy and Government Affairs at Ploughshares Fund, a foundation dedicated preventing the use and spread of nuclear weapons. We'll talk with him about the recent Iran nuclear weapons deal and why Americans should be concerned about the state of nuclear weapons today.

Paul Sweeney

WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner shadows Penn State School of International Affairs students as they participate in a simulation of a UN peace conference centered on a complicated international issue.  

Pages

NPR Stories

Seventeen years after it was destroyed in the September 11 terrorist attacks, New York City's Cortlandt Street subway station has at long last reopened.

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which runs the city's subway system, unveiled the reconstructed station on Saturday, just three days before the anniversary of the attack.

Updated at 8:35 p.m. ET

Les Moonves has stepped down as the chairman, president and CEO of CBS Corporation, after 12 women accused him of sexual misconduct that spanned decades in two reports published in The New Yorker.

For some of the 40 million or so Americans who currently use online dating apps like Tinder, Bumble and Hinge, the findings of the new HBO documentary Swiped might be intuitively obvious.

But for others, there may still be revelations aplenty in the film, which is subtitled Hooking Up in the Digital Age. It's about how these apps may change how we think about relationships — and it doesn't paint a positive picture.

On a cold January day more than a century ago, U.S. troops massacred nearly 200 Piikani people on a Montana river bank. Most were women, children and old folks.

"It's hard to imagine," Chief Stanley Charles Grier of the Piikani Nation in Alberta, Canada said.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Get More NPR News

Florence, Now A Hurricane, Is One Of Many Threats To The Atlantic And Pacific

Updated at 12:45 a.m. ET on Monday A slew of dangerous storms – hurricanes, tropical storms and a typhoon — are on the move and threatening life and property in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The National Hurricane Center has issued advisories for the Atlantic on Hurricane Florence, and two tropical storms, Helene and Isaac. The NHC has also issued an advisory for the Eastern Pacific on Tropical Storm Paul, and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center has issued advisories for Hurricane...

Read More

Opinion: Stand Up And Speak Out

I don't like anonymous bylines. You can't ask questions of an anonymous speaker or writer, try to poke holes in their story, or get them to prove what they say. You can't guess what they hope to gain by writing or saying what they do, whether it's to advance an idea, promote a book or just promote themselves. All of which, by the way, are respectable reasons to write an opinion piece. Anonymous charges have an ugly history in America, from real witch hunts in the American colonies to the...

Read More

Venezuela Decries Reported Meetings Between U.S. Officials And Coup Plotters

Venezuela is responding angrily to a report in The New York Times that details alleged secret meetings between Trump administration officials and Venezuelan military officers seeking to oust the country's authoritarian leader Nicolas Maduro. "We denounce before the international community the intervention plans and the support of military plots by the United States government," Venezuelan Minister of Foreign Affairs Jorge Arreaza said in a tweet . The secret meetings, which NPR has not...

Read More

Ex-Trump Aide Papadopoulos, 1st Charged In Russia Probe, Sentenced To 14 Days

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET The man whose case helped launch the sprawling investigation of Russian election interference that has engulfed the White House was sentenced to 14 days in prison on Friday. George Papadopoulos, 31, pleaded guilty last year to lying to the FBI to conceal his contacts with Russians and Russian intermediaries during the presidential campaign. A federal judge also sentenced Papadopoulos to one year of supervised release and imposed a fine of $9,500. The operatives whom...

Read More

Infectious Theory of Alzheimer's Disease Draws Fresh Interest

Dr. Leslie Norins is willing to hand over $1 million of his own money to anyone who can clarify something: Is Alzheimer's disease, the most common form of dementia worldwide, caused by a germ? By "germ" he means microbes like bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites. In other words, Norins, a physician turned publisher, wants to know if Alzheimer's is infectious. It's an idea that just a few years ago would've seemed to many an easy way to drain your research budget on bunk science. Money has...

Read More

Yosemite Rock Climbing Goes Mainstream

Ken Yager fell in love with Yosemite as a 13-year-old when his dad pulled over and let him run to the base of the 3,000-foot monolith called El Capitan. When he touched it for the first time he said it felt like magic. "It was like sparks going into my hand," Yager said. "It was just really intense. It changed my life. I just became infatuated with the place." California's Yosemite National Park is known to have some of the best and most challenging granite climbing in the world. Yager moved...

Read More

Native Americans Propose Change To Yellowstone Landmark Names

On a cold January day more than a century ago, U.S. troops massacred nearly 200 Piikani people on a Montana river bank. Most were women, children and old folks. "It's hard to imagine," Chief Stanley Charles Grier of the Piikani Nation in Alberta, Canada said. The people killed were his ancestors and accounts of the massacre are brutal. Soldiers killed a mother breastfeeding her baby. They shot sick people hiding under blankets. "Survivors were basically executed by axes," Grier says. "That's...

Read More

Judge Orders Florida Officials To Provide Sample Ballots In Spanish

A federal judge in Florida has ordered Secretary of State Kenneth Detzner to mandate that local election officials comply with the Voting Rights Act of 1965 by providing sample ballots in Spanish. Plaintiffs asked for the materials because many people moved from Puerto Rico to Florida after Hurricane Maria and hope to cast ballots in the November general elections. In a scathing ruling on Friday, U.S. District Judge Mark Walker wrote, "As this Court notes with tiresome regularity, Defendant...

Read More

Biologist Wants Americans To Taste A Rainbow Of Pomegranates

Pomegranates symbolize life and vitality in many cultures. They are mentioned in the Quran, in ancient Greek mythology, and in Chinese folktales. Perhaps you bought one to split open during Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year celebrated this weekend. But for many Americans, the fruit is far too exotic for regular consumption. If you can find them, there's usually just one variety — Wonderful. It comes in a mysterious, dark-red, leathery ball containing hard-to-get jewel-bright seeds and a...

Read More

WATCH: Can You Affect Another Person's Behavior With Your Thoughts?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UdVxv330n1I Do you think that the private thoughts in your head could influence how other people — or creatures — act? The answer is "Of course not," right? Because to say yes would be to admit you believe in mind control or telekinesis or some other phenomenon usually reserved for superhero comic books. But early in his career, a research psychologist named Bob Rosenthal wasn't so sure. So to test his hypothesis, he designed a devious experiment . Late one...

Read More

'Vanishing Twins' Follows One Woman's Search For Individuality Amid Coupledom

When Leah Dieterich accidentally stumbles upon the phenomenon of vanishing twin syndrome, she believes she might have hit on an explanation she's been looking for her entire life. "I've always preferred being in the company of one other person to being in a group," she writes in her memoir, Vanishing Twins . "I'd thought this meant I was antisocial, but maybe it's a desire to return to the relationship I had with another person in the womb." She calls the closeness she seeks twinning , "a...

Read More

Schools Face Extreme Heat; 'Nontraditional' College Students; And Teaching Technology

You're reading NPR's weekly roundup of education news. Schools and colleges are coping with extreme heat 2018 was the fourth-hottest summer on record. One impact of climate change: Dozens of school districts, particularly in the Northeast, had to close early this week because of inadequate air conditioning. It happened in Maryland, Massachusetts , Ohio, Connecticut, Pennsylvania, New York and also in New Jersey, where several students at one school collapsed in gym class . Some universities —...

Read More

Not My Job: 'To All The Boys' Author Jenny Han Gets Quizzed On Toys

Jenny Han is the bestselling author behind To All The Boys I've Loved Before — which has just been adapted by Netflix into a teen romantic comedy. We've invited her to play a game called "To all the toys I've loved before" — three questions about Furbies, Easy Bake Ovens, and one very questionable Cold War-era product for kids. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. PETER SAGAL, HOST: And now the game where we talk to somebody about something they don't particularly want...

Read More

'A Room Away From The Wolves' Makes The Gothic Bitingly Modern

In A Room Away from the Wolves , angry, complicated girls get entangled in a Gothic mystery with all the classic elements — an old house, a cursed ring, a legacy handed from mother to daughter — but Nova Ren Suma manages to take these tropes and transform them into something modern and biting that lingers far beyond the final page. When Bina and her mother ran away from her abusive father, they were supposed to end up in New York City. But instead, they moved in with another man and his two...

Read More

Submit YOUR questions for Congressional candidates.

We'll use them in our upcoming interviews.

The NPR Politics Show: Saturdays At Noon, September 15 Through Election Day

The Politics Show is the definitive guide to the 2018 midterms: a one-hour roundtable discussion airing for nine weeks that presents a deep dive on the major races & issues. It starts September 15.

NPR's "Planet Money/How I Built This"

Saturdays at 7:00am: “Planet Money” and “How I Built This” are two half-hour shows that together make a one-hour weekly program on business and entrepreneurship from NPR.

The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

Get The New Free WPSU App!

Take public media anywhere you go with the WPSU mobile app available for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android and Amazon devices.

It's Folk Season

The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through December, when the Metropolitain Opera Radio Season begins again.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

Get your NPR News Fix This Weekend!

Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings, 8:00-10:00am; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm on WPSU-FM.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

Add your voice!

Write an essay for WPSU's This I Believe or BookMark.

On-Air Schedule

Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

WPSU Podcasts

Subscribe to our podcasts and stay on top of your world with WPSU.

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.