Small Group Of White Supremacists Rally In D.C. Amid Mass Counterprotests

Updated at 10:05 p.m. ET A small group of about 25 white supremacist demonstrators rallied next to the White House on Sunday, one year after the "Unite the Right" demonstration by the same organizer turned deadly in Charlottesville, Va. The demonstrators have since left D.C. via Metro , and WAMU's Elly Yu reports that counterprotesters have headed home, too. WAMU's Carmel Delshad reported that hundreds of counterdemonstrators converged in Lafayette Square, the grassy, White House-adjacent...

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StoryCorps pair
Emily Reddy

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Longtime friends Pauline Zerby and Jerelene Reish talk about growing up in Millheim.

We remember Col. Gerald Russell, a decorated Marine commander and devoted community volunteer. He died February 24, 2014, at age 97. We share our last interview with him from May, 2007. Plus, historian Jeffry Wert on the significance of Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address, which he delivered 149 years ago this week. Some say it’s his greatest speech.

Universities are testing the boundaries of online education with MOOCs, or Massively Open Online Courses. The courses are free and open to anyone and everyone who wants to take part. WPSU’s Emily Reddy takes a look at a Penn State MOOC that’s just wrapping up, about a year after the university first decided to try out this new educational format.

Today marks 149 years since Abraham Lincoln delivered his second inaugural address, just over a month before the end of the Civil War. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talks with historian, author, and Centre Hall native Jeffry Wert about why the speech has lasting significance.

Looking for an older WPSU's Story Corps interview? Find them among our story archives.

State College Homeless Shelter
Kate Lao Shaffner

Yesterday, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked to folks with Centre County's Out of the Cold and Hearts for the Homeless programs, which seek to provide respite for the homeless during the winter months. Here's the second part of the series, about the broader issues of homelessness in the Centre region.

Whitney Hunsinger is sitting in the living room of Centre House, a homeless shelter in downtown State College. Her daughters, who are two and four, are coloring and watching TV. Hunsinger is nine months pregnant.

Yesterday, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reported on Centre County's Out of the Cold and Hearts for the Homeless programs. Today, we'll hear about the year-round reality of homelessness in State College, a town where many might assume homelessness isn't a concern.

Cot with quilt
Kate Lao Shaffner

For many of our listeners, the worst thing a colder-than-usual winter can bring is a higher heating bill.  But for the homeless, the frigid temperatures could be a matter of life and death.  How do Centre County residents who don’t have a home get out of the cold?

For many of our listeners, the worst a colder-than-usual winter can bring is an expensive heating bill. But for the homeless, the frigid temperatures could be a matter of life or death. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talks with Centre County residents about how those without homes get out of the cold.  

John Gaudlip in front of field with sprinklers.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

    

This week WPSU is taking a look at water issues in central Pennsylvania. Today, WPSU’s Emily Reddy explores the massive task of supplying and cleaning the water used by students, faculty, staff and visitors at Penn State University. 

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NPR Stories

After carrying her deceased baby for at least 17 days and 1,000 miles, an orca mother has shown signs of returning to normal.

She was seen Saturday with fellow members of her pod, chasing a school of salmon. She is no longer carrying her baby, and she looks healthy. "Her tour of grief is now over and her behavior is remarkably frisky," according to a statement on the Center for Whale Research's website.

Mohamedou Ould Slahi and Steve Wood met in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in 2004.

At the time, Slahi had been in captivity for two years, accused of acts of terrorism.

Wood, then a member of the National Guard, was assigned to watch the Mauritania native. For nine months, they spent their days together.

After more than a decade, the two saw each other once again this spring, when Wood traveled to Slahi's home in Mauritania to see his old friend.

For years, tech employees of companies in Silicon Valley have enjoyed free meals around the clock. That's changing — at least in Mountain View, Calif., where the city is banning the social media giant Facebook from offering free food in its newest office building.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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We're going to revisit a story from NPR's American Anthem series, exploring songs that tap into the collective emotions that listeners and performers have around an issue or belief.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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We're going to revisit a story from NPR's American Anthem series, exploring songs that tap into the collective emotions that listeners and performers have around an issue or belief.

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We Asked: How Is The Homeownership Crisis Affecting You?

People from nearly every state in the country responded to a request from NPR on social media to tell us about their experience trying to buy a home. From urban metro areas to distant suburbs, there were common themes of rising home prices coupled with limited options. In a series of stories NPR has reported on a variety of factors that are contributing to this new housing crisis: a construction labor shortage, rising costs of building materials, a shortage of undeveloped land, and an...

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For Wisconsin's Dairy Farmers, Tariffs Could Reshape The Race For The Senate

Janet Clark hopes to keep her dairy farm in the family. She inherited Vision Aire Farms from her parents, and now runs it with her younger brother. The farm is idyllic, tucked away amid rolling green hills of corn and sunflower fields. One side of the farm holds a line of calves. They are individually fed by Clark's children and their cousins, playfully holding milk bottles for them to drink. It's here where Clark and her family begin work each day at 5:30 a.m., doing chores and milking cows....

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Jury Awards Terminally Ill Man $289 Million In Lawsuit Against Monsanto

At 42, Dewayne Johnson developed a bad rash that was eventually diagnosed as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Four years later Johnson — now near death, according to his doctors — has been awarded a staggering sum of $289 million dollars in damages in a case against agricultural giant Monsanto. The former school groundskeeper sued the company, arguing that an herbicide in the weed killer Roundup, likely caused the disease. His lawyers also contended Monsanto failed to warn consumers about the alleged...

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Treating Teen Depression Might Improve Mental Health Of Parents Too

An estimated 12.8 percent of adolescents in the U.S. experience at least one episode of major depression, according to the National Institute of Mental Health. According to previous studies , many of those teens' mental health is linked to depression in their parents. But new research suggests there's a flipside to that parental effect: When teens are treated for depression, their parents' mental health improves, too. We tend to think of depression as affecting individuals. But Myrna Weissman...

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In Parts Of California Blanketed With Wildfire Smoke, Breathing Is 'A Chore'

Debbie Dobrosky noticed a peculiar hue in the sky on August 6 — "a very ugly yellow casting" — as she peeked outside. A large cloud of smoke had begun to cover the sun. By the next day, the smoke was so heavy that "even inside my apartment I've had to use my inhaler twice this morning, which is not a normal thing," says Dobrosky, a Riverside County, Calif., resident who lives about 30 miles from a fast-growing fire in the Cleveland National Forest. "Today I'm stuck inside, there's no going...

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Growers Are Beaming Over The Success Of Lasers To Stave Off Thieving Birds

During every berry-picking season in the Pacific Northwest, blueberry and raspberry growers fight to prevent birds from gobbling up the crop before harvest. This year, some farmers are trying something new to scare away the thieving birds: lasers. Justin Meduri manages a large blueberry farm and cherry orchard outside Jefferson, Ore. Birds like both fruits. "Flocks can move in of up to 2,000 to 3,000 starling birds," Meduri says. The starlings gorge themselves and knock down berries right as...

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'The Line That Held Us': Noir In Appalachia

David Joy's new novel The Line That Held Us begins with a terrible accident. Darl Moody is looking to poach a deer in the woods, when he accidentally kills another man — Carol Brewer, who is himself poaching for ginseng roots. Both are "working-class rural people who are just kind of doing what they have to do in order to survive," as David Joy says in an interview. That shooting leads to a cover-up that spins out of control. Along the way, we meet a fascinating and ferocious character:...

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After Charlottesville, Alt-Right Groups Splinter, Distance From White Supremacy

One year after the deadly white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Va., experts who monitor domestic extremism in the United States are taking stock of where the far-right movement stands. The movement is often referred to as "alt-right" — a term that was coined around the 2016 election to describe the vast mix of extreme right factions including white supremacist and anti-Muslim and anti-Semitic groups, white nationalists and others. Here's what we know about where the movement is heading...

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A Songwriting Mystery Solved: Math Proves John Lennon Wrote 'In My Life'

Lennon-McCartney is likely one of the most famous songwriting credits in music. John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote lyrics and music for almost 200 songs and The Beatles have sold hundreds of millions of albums. The story goes that the two Beatles agreed as teenagers to the joint credit for all songs they wrote, no matter the divide in work. Over the years, Lennon and McCartney have revealed who really wrote what, but some songs are still up for debate. The two even debate between themselves...

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'We Are Resilient': Memorials, Heavy Police Presence Mark Charlottesville Anniversary

Updated at 1:30 p.m. ET In downtown Charlottesville, Va., authorities are limiting car and pedestrian traffic, dozens of police in riot gear are patrolling a park in the city's center and some residents have left town in case the weekend turns violent. Sunday is the first anniversary of the deadly Unite the Right rally , the white supremacist march that boiled into a chaotic clash between protesters and counter-protesters, injuring dozens. NPR's Debbie Elliott reports that memorials have been...

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A Yemeni-American Wanted To Bring His Family Home. Then Came The Travel Ban.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=324k9qPkU0I Nageeb Alomari has lived the Trump Administration's travel ban. Alomari is from Yemen, and he moved to the U.S. in the 1990s. He worked at gas stations in Alabama, then California. In 2000, he married a woman in Yemen, and they eventually had three daughters. Like a lot of men from his country, Alomari lived and worked in the U.S. and sent money back to his wife and kids, who stayed in Yemen. In 2010, Alomari became an American citizen. A year later...

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Let This Percussionist Blow Your Mind With The Fibonacci Sequence

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOMLRMfIYf0 Rhythm nerd alert! Bow down, drummers! Our social feeds have been on fire with a mind-bending, gasp-worthy video posted earlier this week — below — made by the accomplished Indian percussionist B.C. Manjunath . He's a master of konnakol -- the Carnatic, or South Indian, art of speaking percussive syllables in rapid-fire, intricate patterns to convey a larger thalam , or rhythmic cycle. But here, B.C. Manjunath isn't using any old thalam for his...

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The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

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NPR's "Planet Money/How I Built This"

Saturdays at 7:00am: “Planet Money” and “How I Built This” are two half-hour shows that together make a one-hour weekly program on business and entrepreneurship from NPR.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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It's Folk Season

The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through December, when the Metropolitain Opera Radio Season begins again.

Get your NPR News Fix This Weekend!

Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings, 8:00-10:00am; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.