Russia Says Agreements Were Discussed With Trump On Syria. The U.S. Is Silent

Russian officials are saying the meeting in Helsinki between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin resulted in an agreement that includes cooperation between the two countries in Syria. Speaking at a news conference next to Trump on Monday, Putin said establishing peace and reconciliation "could be the first showcase example of the successful joint work. Russia and the United States apparently can proactively take leadership on this issue," including overcoming the humanitarian...

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The Bellefonte Borough Council held a special meeting yesterday to vote on the fate of the historic Garman Theatre. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports the council approved demolition of the Garman in a 5-4 vote.  

Nov. 5 is Election Day. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports voters are NOT required to show an ID to vote.  

Curator of the Pasto Agricultural Museum, Rita Graef, shows off some of the museum's antique farm equipment.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

The conversations you've been hearing from Story Corps Ag Progress Days were recorded at a unique museum. The Pasto Agricultural Museum's "collection" is made up of farming implements from a time when horse power referred to how many animals you hooked up to a piece of equipment. WPSU's Emily Reddy visited the Pasto during the recent Ag Progress Days events to give us a taste of the farming and household innovations of yesteryear housed at the museum.  

The historic Garman Opera House Theatre in Bellefonte might soon be razed.

Old Main building at Penn State
WPSU

Penn State's Faculty Senate Council met yesterday for the first time since the controversial changes to employee healthcare benefits were announced last month. The meeting was not open to the public, but afterward WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner spoke with the Faculty Senate Chairman and Penn State's Vice President for Human Resources.  

It's been 80 years since the first drive-in movie opened in Camden, New Jersey. At its heyday, there were more than 4,000 drive-in movie theaters across America. Now there are fewer than 400. The latest challenge for drive-ins everywhere is Hollywood's switch to digital film distribution. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner visited a drive-in along Route 322 in Clearfield County.

Old Main building at Penn State
WPSU

First, a Q & A with Penn State's VP for Human Resources about the university's new "Take Care of Your Health" program. Employees who do not participate in the three-part plan will be charged a $100 a month surcharge. Then an encore conversation about water fluoridation and just why it's so controversial.  

According to the CDC, contaminated foods cause 3,000 deaths a year in the US. In response to large-scale and highly-publicized contaminations in recent years to foods like spinach and peanut butter, the government has created the Food Safety Modernization Act. But WPSU's Emily Reddy talked with one advocate who worries the bill will hurt smaller farms.

Old Main building at Penn State
WPSU

Penn State is introducing changes to its employee health insurance benefit plans. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner met with Penn State's Vice President for Human Resources, Susan Basso, to ask some questions.  

A long, cold winter – like the one that is mercifully coming to a close – can be more than just an emotional drain. It can be a drain on home finances and the environment. As her home-heating bills piled up, WPSU’s Emily Reddy went in search of solutions for her energy woes. She found a program gearing up at Penn State to help homeowners just like her.

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Ordering a "grande four-pump, nonfat, no-whip, extra-hot mocha" is a mouthful for any hot beverage nerd, but for deaf people, it can be hard to order just a simple cup of black coffee. Global coffee behemoth Starbucks' "Signing Store Project," launching in Washington, D.C. in October, aims to change that.

Adam Novsam, a deaf utility analyst at Starbucks headquarters in Seattle, knows firsthand how frustrating it can be to accomplish even the most basic transactions in the hearing world.

Malcolm Holcombe On Mountain Stage

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"If you want anything more authentically Appalachian, you're going to have to dig it out of the ground" are the words host Larry Groce himself used to describe Malcolm Holcombe before this appearance on Mountain Stage. This was Holcombe's third visit with us here in West Virginia and, as always, he reminded us why he's known as a legend in the folk music underground.

Hailing from the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, Holcombe creates a beautifully rugged sound that you just can't fake.

When The Internet first debuted in 2011, the common joke was that the musicians had picked an unfortunate name for fans who wanted to find anything about them on, you know, the Internet. But those cheap snickers quickly faded as the group's sly, slick funk sensibility took hold, even for search engines. Seriously, Google them.

Not since a deadly famine was ravaging North Korea in 1997 has the country seen its economy contract at such a large rate as it did last year. After a couple of years of growth, the country's estimated gross domestic product went reeling in the other direction in 2017, shrinking 3.5 percent, according to South Korea's central bank.

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Week Of Trump Reversals Puts 2018 Election Security In The Spotlight

With less than four months to go, how much are this year's midterm elections at risk for the kind of interference sowed by Russia in 2016? It's a question that's coming up again after President Trump's seemingly shifting positions this week about Russia's responsibility for the interference in 2016, and after special counsel Robert Mueller's recent indictments of 12 Russian intelligence officers accused of hacking the Democratic Party and state election computer networks. It would be "foolish...

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Appeals Court Nomination Withdrawn Before An Expected Failure On Senate Floor

Updated at 5:10 p.m. ET The White House withdrew the nomination Ryan Bounds to be a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit Thursday afternoon amid allegations of racist writings. The Senate, on a party-line vote Wednesday, ended debate on the controversial nomination, with a confirmation vote expected Thursday. But instead, the nomination was pulled. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., announced the withdrawal ahead of a confirmation vote when it became clear that...

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17 Dead After Amphibious Tour Boat Sinks In Missouri Lake

Updated at 1:41 p.m. ET Seventeen people are dead after an amphibious tourist boat carrying 31 people capsized and sank Thursday during a severe squall in a lake in southern Missouri. The Ride the Ducks Branson boat sank on Table Rock Lake near the resort town of Branson on Thursday. Divers worked through the night on rescue and recovery operations. On Friday morning, the county sheriff told reporters that all the bodies had been found, bringing the death toll to 17. The capsize occurred...

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Debut Novelist Enters Mind Of Aging Man To Explore Grief And Life's Meaning

In her poignant new book The Dependents , debut novelist Katharine Dion adeptly and often poetically explores serious topics like grief, friendship and how to know whether ones life has had meaning. Here & Now s Robin Young talks with Dion about the book, which makes for a memorable summer read thanks to its quirky characters, interesting relationships and expressive writing. Book Excerpt: The Dependents by Katharine Dion His wife had died in June and there was to be a memorial service for...

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iTeach: A Guide To The Most Useful Apps For The Classroom

Smartphones and tablets have quickly become a permanent part of students' daily lives. Kids up to 8 years old spent almost an hour a day on mobile devices, Common Sense Media reported last year. And the amount of time kids spend with screens only increases as they get older. On average, 13- to 18-year-olds spend about nine hours a day on entertainment media, much of which is on tablets and smart phones. But mobile devices don't have to be a distraction. When they are used for project-based...

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Migrating Arctic Geese Are Confused, Exhausted By Rising Temperatures

Each spring, barnacle geese migrate more than 1,800 miles from the Netherlands and northern Germany to their breeding grounds in parts of Russia above the Arctic Circle. The journey north usually takes about a month, and the geese make multiple stops along the way to eat and fatten up before they lay their eggs, says Bart Nolet of the Netherlands Institute of Ecology and the University of Amsterdam. But that pattern of migration is changing, as rapidly rising temperatures have led to earlier...

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Facebook Faces Increasing Scrutiny Over Election-Related Russian Ads

Facebook is under increasing pressure to scrutinize its advertising content after it discovered that at least 3,000 ads on the site had been placed by a Russian agency to influence the 2016 presidential election. The revelations about the ads came after months of denial by CEO Mark Zuckerberg that Facebook played any role in influencing voters. As has been widely reported, the pressure on the company began shortly after the 2016 election. But Zuckerberg rejected the idea that fake news on the...

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A Spike In Liver Disease Deaths Among Young Adults Fueled By Alcohol

Dr. Elliot Tapper has treated a lot of patients, but this one stood out. "His whole body was yellow," Tapper remembers. "He could hardly move. It was difficult for him to breathe, and he wasn't eating anything." The patient was suffering from chronic liver disease. After years of alcohol use, his liver had stopped filtering his blood. Bilirubin, a yellowish waste compound, was building up in his body and changing his skin color. Disturbing to Tapper, the man was only in his mid-30s – much...

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Transcript: Dan Coats Warns The Lights Are 'Blinking Red' On Russian Cyberattacks

The director of National Intelligence spoke before the Hudson Institute, a D.C.-based conservative think tank, on July 13. Transcript provided by the Hudson Institute. Ken, thank you very much. It's nice to be here at Hudson. We enjoyed Hudson's presence in Indiana for a time. Then former OMB Director Mitch Daniels became governor of Indiana — in the meantime, lured Hudson to come to the middle of the country to get a different perspective perhaps than what we get from the coast. You were...

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Carne Asada, Hold The Meat: Why Latinos Are Embracing Vegan-Mexican Cuisine

Tall, dreadlocked Josh Scheper knew he was out of place as he surveyed the scene at a Santa Ana, Calif., parking lot on a Sunday morning this past April. And the 46-year-old loved it. Hundreds of people waited in line at stalls for vegan food, but few people looked like the Los Angeles resident. Nearly everyone in the crowd was young and Latino, as were the chefs. The food on sale was Mexican — but not hippie-dippy cafe standbys like cauliflower tacos, or tempeh-stuffed burritos. Instead,...

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American Baby Trump Blimp Set To Breeze Onto Namesake's Home Turf

Like any tantruming toddler, the 20-foot-tall baby Trump blimp hovering above Friday's protests in London was difficult to ignore. Now a plan to bring a replica of the yellow-haired, phone-toting, sneering and diapered balloon stateside has garnered so much support that organizers say they will use the funds to buy multiple blimps "so we can go coast-to-coast, border-to-border." New Jersey activists Didier Jiminez-Castro and Jim Girvan said they "were inspired by the patriotic actions of our...

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The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

It's Folk Season

The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through December, when the Metropolitain Opera Radio Season begins again.

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Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings, 8:00-10:00am; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.