Congressional Republicans Race To Minimize Damage From Trump Family Separation Policy

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET Congressional Republicans are racing to find legislative options to stop a White House policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the U.S. border amid widespread condemnation of the practice. Republicans in both the House and the Senate began ramping up pressure on the White House to reverse the policy Monday amid outcry about children being housed in detention centers after being separated from their parents. President Trump is scheduled to meet with...

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Emily Reddy / WPSU

Just over three months ago residents of a mobile home park in Central Pennsylvania were told they had to leave. The Riverdale Mobile Home Park, near Jersey Shore, had been sold. And the new owners planned to put in a water withdrawal facility to service nearby fracking activities. WPSU’s Emily Reddy went to the mobile home park in its final days.

crowd at Bryce Jordan Center
Emily Reddy / WPSU

In State College on Thursday, some 12,000 people turned out for the memorial of long-time Penn State football coach Joe Paterno. Mourners trekked in through the rain to fill Bryce Jordan Center for the memorial.

Paterno statue with crowd
Emily Reddy / WPSU

A steady stream of mourners visited the bronze Joe Paterno statue outside Beaver Stadium yesterday. They went to pay homage to the legendary Penn State football coach.

Most visitors stood and contemplated the statue of Joe Paterno in silence. A few at a time, some walked up to the statue and added candles, flowers, hand-written notes, and Penn State gear to the growing pool of offerings at his feet. By mid-afternoon, someone had draped an American flag over Paterno’s upraised arm. A rosary hung from his other hand. And he wore a blue and white striped Penn State scarf.

Daryl Gregory lives in State College and writes fantasy and science fiction novels.  His new book is a collection of short stories called "Unpossible and Other Stories."

This I Believe: I Believe In Bananagrams

Sep 8, 2011

“Take a letter. Okay, take another. Ha! Take a letter!” We all groan, looking at our Z’s ,K’s and Q’s seriously piling up. We exchange looks with each other that say, “Now how is this fair?” while my mom happily continues to build her ultimate crossword. When the tiles are finally gone, my mom throws her hands in the air and yells “WOOO HOOOO!” That was one of the many times that my mom had beaten our butts at Bananagrams, and the feeling of relief that the round of humiliation was over wasn’t unfamiliar. But then, of course, someone says, “Who's in for another round?

This I Believe: I Believe In Second Impressions

Apr 14, 2011

I was just shy of 17 the first time my brother Daniel introduced me to his girlfriend. Her name was Kristen, and I hated her immediately. But my brother loved her. Granted, I may not have known what love was, but in my teenage years, love meant a brother who would rather be with his girlfriend than with his siblings. Call it what you want *cough* jealously *cough*, but I wasn’t happy.

This I Believe: I Believe Life Should Be "Pun"derful

Mar 24, 2011

One morning, I called the local barbershop to make an appointment. Unfortunately, the barber was all booked up for the day. 

"Well, this is a hairy situation," I said to my girlfriend as I hung up the phone. She replied, "They certainly left you stranded." 

Call me a pundit, a glutton for punishment, or just a "pun"derful guy…I believe in puns. 

You want to spice up any conversation, here's some sage advice. Have a little fun with it. That's why it's called a “play on words” after all. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011
Essayist Lyndsie Wszola.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal.  

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal. 

Lyndsie Wszola is a Penn State student.

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

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NPR Stories

Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry.

Here's what we know about the policy, its history and its effects:

Does the Trump administration have a policy of separating families at the border?

Yes.

Last week Abdul Saleh became at least the sixth New York taxi driver to die by suicide in recent months. The 59-year-old Yemeni immigrant was found dead in his rented Brooklyn room on Friday, in what the city’s taxi union dubbed a death from “financial desperation.”

Here & Now‘s Femi Oke speaks with Bhairavi Desai (@bhairavi_desai), founding member and spokeswoman for the New York Taxi Workers Alliance.

On Saturday, one of the highest-profile and most scrutinized marriages in pop music became an official collaboration with the surprise release of Jay-Z and Beyoncé's album Everything Is Love, credited to The Carters, alongside a video for the album's first single, shot in the Louvre. The album had been rumored since the release of Beyoncé's 2016 album Lemonade and Jay-Z's 4:44, both of which addressed fault lines in the artists' marriage, and in a summer of major hip-hop albums, this instantly marked a new high-water mark.

A Look At Social Media Finds Some Possible Benefits For Kids

39 minutes ago

Screen time is often considered the enemy when it comes to teaching kids to be active and well-behaved. But should all forms of media be considered equal?

Research being presented Tuesday finds that for 9- and 10-year-old children taking part in a study of brain development, greater social media use, such as using scrolling through Instagram and texting, was associated with some positive effects, including increased physical activity, less family conflict and fewer sleep problems.

Federal prosecutors have charged a former CIA software engineer with stealing secret material from the agency and passing it along to "an organization that purports to publicly disseminate classified, sensitive, and confidential information."

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Congressional Republicans Race To Minimize Damage From Trump Family Separation Policy

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET Congressional Republicans are racing to find legislative options to stop a White House policy of separating migrant children from their parents at the U.S. border amid widespread condemnation of the practice. Republicans in both the House and the Senate began ramping up pressure on the White House to reverse the policy Monday amid outcry about children being housed in detention centers after being separated from their parents. President Trump is scheduled to meet with...

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First Ladies Unite Against Separating Children At Border

Updated at 1 p.m. ET First ladies have a long history of advocating for issues important to them, often issues related to children. But what's unusual is to have all the living former presidents' wives speaking out in one voice. America's current and former first ladies are pushing back against the Trump administration's practice of separating children from their parents at the border in an effort to curb illegal crossings. And they've largely been out in front of their husbands in doing so....

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Stock Markets Drop Amid Escalating Tariff Threats

The U.S. stock market fell sharply early Tuesday morning in response to President Trump's recent threats to add another layer of tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods . The Dow Jones industrial average was down about 1.2 percent, or more than 300 points , on pace for its sixth straight daily drop. The threat of a trade war is leaving investors uncertain and is fueling market volatility, said Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate.com. "Markets are responding to all of the...

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How Virtual Advisers Help Low-Income Students Apply To College

Our Take A Number series is exploring problems around the world through the lens of a single number. Some high school students think of applying to colleges as a full-time job. There are essays and tests, loads of financial documents to assemble and calculations to make. After all that comes a big decision — one of the biggest of their young lives. For top students who come from low-income families, the challenge is particularly difficult. Research shows that 1 in 4 juggle all of that — the...

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Judge Tosses Kansas' Proof-Of-Citizenship Voter Law And Rebukes Sec. Of State Kobach

Kansas cannot require people to prove their U.S. citizenship before they can vote, a federal judge says, ruling that the state's election law is unconstitutional. The judge sharply criticized Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, who has based much of his political career on worries about voter fraud. Chief District Judge Julie A. Robinson sanctioned Kobach — who led President Trump's voter fraud commission — by ordering him to take a legal class on the rules of evidence or procedure. Kobach...

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Defiant Homeland Security Secretary Defends Family Separations

Updated at 7:55 p.m. ET Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen is continuing to defend the Trump administration's controversial "zero tolerance" policy that results in separating children from their parents who enter the U.S. illegally. Nielsen appeared at the White House press briefing on Monday, falsely blaming Democrats for the current crisis and arguing that the impetus is on Congress to pass a law to close legal loopholes. "What has changed is that we no longer exempt entire...

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Summer Melt: Why Aren't Students Showing Up For College?

Every year, many students who have overcome daunting obstacles in high school receive good news — they've been accepted to college. These kids represent a success story: through hard work and determination, they've made it into college, and perhaps even on to a better life. Except it doesn't always work out that way. "The rate with which kids who are college-intending do not actually get to college in the fall is surprisingly high," says Lindsay Page , an education researcher at the...

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Lin-Manuel Miranda Unearths New Mobb Deep Song For 'Hamildrop' Series

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E56ihZF2hpk Lin-Manuel Miranda has given hip-hop fans a belated blessing for this month's Hamilton -themed Hamildrop track. "Boom Goes The Cannon...," by legendary rap pair Mobb Deep , is the latest in a canon of new releases related to the Tony-winning musical. The gruff and gritty track showcases the Queens duo at its peak, with a revelatory air; though the track starts with elegant strings, Prodigy and Havoc's signature flows soon come in under a booming...

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Report For Defense Department Ranks Top Threats From 'Synthetic Biology'

New genetic tools are making it easier and cheaper to engineer viruses and bacteria, and a report commissioned by the Department of Defense has now ranked the top threats posed by the rapidly advancing field of "synthetic biology." One of the biggest concerns is the ability to recreate known viruses from scratch in the lab. That means a lab could make a deadly virus that is normally kept under lock and key, such as smallpox . "Right now, recreating pretty much any virus can be done relatively...

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A Connection Between Climate Change And Mental Health — Experts Say It's Time To Take Notice

A recent report from the American Psychiatric Association urges people to participate in policy and advocacy to combat climate change. And thats just one of the medical groups writing about the connection between adverse mental health effects and global disasters related to changing climate. Psychologist Judith Kuriansky  recently moderated a panel on climate change and mental health for the American Public Health Association . Shes traveled nationally and internationally to disaster sites to...

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How The Opioid Crisis Is Depressing America's Labor Force

It's been a decade since the financial crisis drove up the unemployment rate in the U.S. and forced people in the prime of their careers to give up looking for work. Even today, as employers add jobs at a furious pace, the workforce participation rate still hasn't recovered. And now researchers think they know one reason why: the opioid crisis. According to a report by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the percentage of people of prime working age – between 25 and 54 ...

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House GOP Immigration Bill Would Modify — But Not End — Child Detentions

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET House Republican leaders are reworking their "compromise" immigration bill to include a provision that modifies — but doesn't completely end — the "zero tolerance" policy being enforced now by the Trump administration. In the new legislation, children would now be held in the same place as their parents if they are detained. Under the White House's policy, roughly 2,000 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southwest border illegally in the...

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With 'America First,' Trump Challenges The World Constructed After World War II

When World War II ended in August 1945, President Harry Truman was a man in a hurry.

In the final few months of that year, he pushed hard to help establish the United Nations to handle international political disputes, and the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund to deal with the shattered global economy. "He knew the United States was going to have to do a lot, but that the United States couldn't do it all," said Elizabeth Spalding , a biographer of Truman who teaches...

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Pithy And Pointed 'There There' Puts Native American Voices Front And Center

Here's the thing about There There , the debut novel by Native American author Tommy Orange: Even if the rest of its story were just so-so — and it's much more than that — the novel's prologue would make this book worth reading. In that 10-page prologue, Orange wittily and witheringly riffs on some 500 years of native people's history, a history of genocide and dislocation presented mostly through the image of heads. He begins with a description of the "Indian Head test pattern," a graphic...

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The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

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Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

NPR And Spotify Team Up To Feed Your Podcast Addiction

Public radio podcast lovers, clear your schedules: Spotify users now have the NPR podcast catalogue at their fingertips. From classic NPR favorites like Fresh Air to TED Radio Hour , to the media giant's latest viral titles like Invisibilia , Hidden Brain, and How I Built This , all of NPR's podcasts have a home on Spotify. Fans new and old are part of the one-third of Americans who listen to podcasts, with 12 percent streaming 10 hours or more each week . As podcasts bleed ever more into...

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Folk Season Is Back on WPSU-FM

Join us for a mix of lovingly hand-curated, locally-hosted folk music Saturday afternoons from 1:00-5:00pm and Sunday nights from 10:00pm to midnight on The Folk Show WPSU-FM.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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