Justice Department To Expand Internal Inquiry After Top-Level Meeting With Trump

Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET The Justice Department is broadening its internal investigation into the FBI's Russia inquiry after a top-level meeting at the White House on Monday with President Trump. Inspector General Michael Horowitz will be asked to look into "any irregularities" with the "tactics concerning the Trump campaign," said White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, FBI Director Christopher Wray and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats met...

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This I Believe: I Believe Life Should Be "Pun"derful

Mar 24, 2011

One morning, I called the local barbershop to make an appointment. Unfortunately, the barber was all booked up for the day. 

"Well, this is a hairy situation," I said to my girlfriend as I hung up the phone. She replied, "They certainly left you stranded." 

Call me a pundit, a glutton for punishment, or just a "pun"derful guy…I believe in puns. 

You want to spice up any conversation, here's some sage advice. Have a little fun with it. That's why it's called a “play on words” after all. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011
Essayist Lyndsie Wszola.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal.  

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal. 

Lyndsie Wszola is a Penn State student.

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

Penn State professor Alex Hristov
Emily Reddy / WPSU

It’s feeding time at an experimental dairy barn not far from Beaver stadium. A big square machine on wheels spits a pile of hay in front of each cow on one side of the barn, and lab assistant Chan Hee Lee pours a bucket of dried green leaf bits on top.

As the feeding machine finishes up and rolls out of the barn, Alex Hristov says they tried a lot of things before they found oregano reduced cows’ methane output.

“We started with essential oils,” Hristov said. “Lavender, mint. Citrus, onion, anything, you name it.

So why is Hristov focused on cutting methane?

This I Believe: I Believe In Heavy Metal

Mar 11, 2010

I believe heavy metal.
 
When I was 12 years old I saw Metallica’s music video for the song, “One.” The video mixes gritty black and white band footage with excerpts from the film Johnny Got His Gun about a hospitalized soldier who lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and speech to a landmine. Over this footage, “One” goes from lament to unstoppable barrage.
 
I believed this song.
 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

This I Believe: I Believe In Public Radio

Apr 2, 2009

For many people, April 15 is TAX DAY! April 15 for me, however, has a different significance…

In 1982, I moved to a small mountain town in Colorado. I thought I’d found the perfect place to live. But there was one thing missing. No public radio. I used to spin the FM dial searching for the voice of the community.  All I would hear was canned music or talk programs packaged somewhere far away and made local only by the commercials injected.

This I Believe: I Believe In Slowing Down

Feb 5, 2009

On a rainy morning when I was ten, my neighbor Mr. Lovett invited me into his home for a woodworking project. Above his fireplace sat an ornate eagle carved by Mr. Lovett himself. Its wingspan was wider than I was tall. I remember wondering how long it took him to make that eagle.

Mr. Lovett guided my block of wood under the scroll saw until it morphed into the rough outline of a duck.

Each year, WPSU holds our "Art for the Airwaves" contest. And our panel of judges selects a winner, whose work is made into a limited edition poster print offered during our fund drive. WPSU's Kristine Allen visited Smethport to talk with this year's winner.  

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The commencement speech is a proud tradition. Or at least it's a tradition.

And since no college invited Stacey and Cardiff to give a commencement speech, they're taking to the podcast to offer their own brand of evidence-based wisdom for new college grads.

Links:

Highest Educational Levels Reached by Adults in the U.S. Since 1940

A Pakistani exchange student was one of the 10 people shot dead in the Santa Fe High School shooting on Friday. She came from a country where militants have attacked schools and killed students, so her death — in a country that once seemed so much safer than Pakistan — shocked many in her home country.

Some predict 3D printing could revolutionize everything from manufacturing and medicine, as more people get access to technology that lets them cheaply make their own parts and products.

But the same technology that might one day custom-print heart valves or lead to astronauts manufacturing their own tools aboard the International Space Station could also be used to print bombs and explosives, or make it possible for countries like North Korea and Iran to evade international sanctions.

Health workers have unsheathed their experimental new weapon against the Ebola virus in the northwest reaches of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. On Monday, the World Health Organization, together with local and international partners, began administering Ebola vaccinations in the region, where at least 49 suspected cases have been reported since early April and at least 26 people are believed to have died.

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Justice Department To Expand Internal Inquiry After Top-Level Meeting With Trump

Updated at 5:09 p.m. ET The Justice Department is broadening its internal investigation into the FBI's Russia inquiry after a top-level meeting at the White House on Monday with President Trump. Inspector General Michael Horowitz will be asked to look into "any irregularities" with the "tactics concerning the Trump campaign," said White House press secretary Sarah Sanders. Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, FBI Director Christopher Wray and Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats met...

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VA's Caregiver Program Still Dropping Veterans With Disabilities

In the early days of the Iraq War, troops were riding around in Humvees with almost no armor on them. There was a scandal about it, and within a few years the trucks got up-armored with thick steel plates, which solved one problem but created another. "Some genius thought about up-armoring. Good! But they didn't do anything with the brake systems," says George Wilmot, who was riding an armored Humvee in 2009, leaving a hilltop base in Mosul. "We took some small arms fire ... my driver took us...

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A Texas Town Mourns, And A Nation Struggles To Find New Ground In Gun Debate

Three days after a shooting at a Texas high school took the lives of eight students and two teachers, a town and a country are trying to figure out what comes next. Gov. Greg Abbott called for a moment of silence across Texas at 10 a.m. local time, to honor the memory of those who died in Friday's violence in the city of 12,000 between Houston and Galveston. "The act of evil that occurred in Santa Fe has deeply touched the core of who we are as Texans," Abbott said in a statement. "In the...

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Hawaii Volcano's Lava Spews 'Laze' Of Toxic Gas And Glass Into The Air

Lava from the Kilauea volcano is pouring into the Pacific Ocean off of Hawaii's Big Island, generating a plume of "laze" – which Hawaii County officials describe as hydrochloric acid and steam with fine glass particles — into the air. Officials say it's one more reason to avoid the area. "Health hazards of laze include lung damage, and eye and skin irritation," says the Hawaii County Civil Defense agency . "Be aware that the laze plume travels with the wind and can change direction without...

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Supreme Court Decision Delivers Blow To Workers' Rights

In a case involving the rights of tens of millions of private-sector employees, the U.S. Supreme Court, by a 5-4 vote, delivered a major blow to workers, ruling for the first time that workers may not band together to challenge violations of federal labor laws. Writing for the majority, Justice Neil Gorsuch said that the 1925 Federal Arbitration Act trumps the National Labor Relations Act and that employees who sign employment agreements to arbitrate claims must do so on an individual basis —...

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'Cello Bae' Sheku Kanneh-Mason Wins Worldwide Fans After Royal Wedding

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TeDB27cq3fE The British-born, 19-year-old prodigy Sheku Kanneh-Mason was a standout at the wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle this weekend. Kanneh-Mason performed three pieces during the ceremony, as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex signed the register (out of view of guests and cameras) just after their exchanging of vows. Kanneh-Mason performed Maria Theresia von Paradis' Sicilienne, Gabriel Fauré's Après un rêve and Franz Schubert's "Ave Maria." But,...

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Foreign Investors Shrug Off Miami's Rising Sea Levels

The seas are rising, frequently flooding the streets even when no storms are on the horizon. But that hasn't stopped foreign investors from shelling out big dollars for Miami real estate. Many are in it for the relatively short-term investment, then they'll try to sell before climate change takes its toll, observers of the local market say. Visit South Florida and you would have no idea this boomtown was a subprime war zone just a decade ago. In the wake of that collapse, Miami's skyline was...

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A Campaign Frozen In Time: Photographer Reflects On Covering Bobby Kennedy

It's unlikely that David Kennerly's most famous photographs could be recaptured today. That's because 50 years ago, the Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist and his colleagues covered the Robert F. Kennedy campaign under far more relaxed circumstances. Photography has always been inseparable from politics, with the image of presidential candidates inextricably tied to their message. But over the years, as security around U.S. politicians has tightened, photographers are no longer allowed...

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NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s93i7m82h54 There's going to be a changing of the guard in space. On Tuesday, NASA is launching two new satellites, collectively called GRACE, to replace two that have been retired after 16 years in orbit. GRACE stands for Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment . The satellites measure — with exquisite sensitivity — changes in the Earth's gravitational field. They are one of the most important tools for understanding the effects of climate change, and they...

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Richard Goodwin, Crafter Of Johnson's Famous 'We Shall Overcome' Speech, Dies

Speechwriter Richard Goodwin, a driving force in American politics during times of upheaval in the 1960s and the husband of presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, has died at age 86. Goodwin was a key aide and speechwriter for Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson, crafting messages about civil rights and equality and challenging America to live up to its ideals. Goodwin died of cancer, the Associated Press reports , citing a statement from his wife. Doris Kearns Goodwin says...

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The Band's Visit: Tiny Desk Concert

After nearly 800 Tiny Desk concerts, The Band's Visit is the first Broadway musical ever to play the series. The crew from the show, which opened last November at the Ethel Barrymore Theater, descended on NPR at 8:30 a.m. — seven musicians, five actors, a wardrobe department, a make-up artist, a publicist, a music director, the composer and even a vlogger. We started early so they could hustle back to Manhattan for a 7 p.m. curtain. The story of The Band's Visit , composer David Yazbek told...

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Is Sleeping With Your Baby As Dangerous As Doctors Say?

Six months ago, Melissa Nichols brought her baby girl, Arlo, home from the hospital. And she immediately had a secret. "I just felt guilty and like I didn't want to tell anyone," says Nichols, who lives in San Francisco. "It feels like you're a bad mom. The mom guilt starts early, I guess." Across town, first-time mom Candyce Hubbell has the same secret — and she hides it from her pediatrician. "I don't really want to be lectured," she says. "I know what her stance will be on it. " The way...

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Royal Wedding Was Filled With Symbolism Of African-American History

The power of love was on full display Saturday as millions tuned in across the world to watch the royal wedding ceremony between Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. While the couple, now the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, were the main focal point for the day of festivities, it can be argued that the Most Rev. Michael Bruce Curry of Chicago stole part of the show. Curry, the first African-American leader of the Episcopal Church, started out by reading a biblical passage from the Song of Solomon and...

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Classical Music Captures A Young Wife's Anxiety In 'On Chesil Beach'

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZR6DWDfMDlM The film On Chesil Beach opens with a cocksure Edward, played by Billy Howle, mansplaining the blues to his new wife, Florence, a classical violinist played by Saoirse Ronan . It's a snapshot of the young couple's relationship, which disintegrates throughout the course of the film due to mismatched expectations and fears of intimacy. Director Dominic Cooke, a veteran of theater making his feature film debut with this Ian McEwan novella adaption,...

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The Great American Read

PBS asked Americans to name their best-loved novel, and they’ve compiled a list of the top 100. Make a case for your favorite novel on the list through a BookMark review!

Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

NPR And Spotify Team Up To Feed Your Podcast Addiction

Public radio podcast lovers, clear your schedules: Spotify users now have the NPR podcast catalogue at their fingertips. From classic NPR favorites like Fresh Air to TED Radio Hour , to the media giant's latest viral titles like Invisibilia , Hidden Brain, and How I Built This , all of NPR's podcasts have a home on Spotify. Fans new and old are part of the one-third of Americans who listen to podcasts, with 12 percent streaming 10 hours or more each week . As podcasts bleed ever more into...

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Get The New Free WPSU App!

Take public media anywhere you go with the WPSU mobile app available for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android and Amazon devices.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

Folk Season Is Back on WPSU-FM

Join us for a sweet and salty blend of lovingly hand-curated, locally-hosted folk music Saturday afternoons from 1:00-5:00pm and Sunday nights from 10:00pm to midnight on The Folk Show WPSU-FM.

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Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!