Former President George. H.W. Bush Hospitalized For Blood Infection

Former President George H.W. Bush, whose wife, Barbara, died just last week, has been admitted to a Houston hospital for an infection that has spread to his blood. "He is responding to treatments and appears to be recovering," Bush family spokesman Jim McGrath said in a statement. "We will issue additional updates as events warrant." The 93-year-old Bush was admitted to Houston Methodist Hospital on Sunday morning, the day after his wife's funeral. The two had been married for 73 years when...

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WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Sandra Yohe talks with her mother Marie Breon about her life, and how she met her husband.  

WPSU's Beyond the Classroom examines innovative student learning that isn't bound by university walls. Penn State University is embracing this concept in an initiative it's calling "Engaged Scholarship." WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports the inaugural Engaged Scholarship Symposium was held at the Nittany Lion Inn yesterday.

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WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Jim Zubler and Andrea Ferich talk to Nicholas Brink about his time in central Pennsylvania starting with when he moved here in 1970 to take a job at Penn State. Brink had already been active in the civil rights movement while he was working on a PhD at UCLA.  

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  WPSU's Beyond the Classroom is our series featuring students engaging in hands-on experiences outside university walls. Today, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner takes us to Lock Haven University, where a group of students are traveling abroad as a class. The university will soon require all students to fulfill a global awareness requirement.

Why is hunger still a widespread problem in a world of plenty? WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talks about that with activist and journalist Roger Thurow. He's the author of Enough: Why the World's Poorest Starve in the Age of Plenty and The Last Hunger Season. Thurow visited Penn State's School of International Affairs in February.

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WPSU's Beyond the Classroom is our series featuring students engaging in hands-on experiences outside university walls. Today, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner takes us to Lock Haven University, where a group of students are traveling abroad as a class. The university will soon require all students to fulfill a global awareness requirement.

In case you were wondering what Ethiopian Pop music of the 60’s & 70’s would sound like blended with jazz and funk - . wonder no more! WPSU’s Kristine Allen says the answer can be found when Debo Band plays a concert in the Juniata Presents Series at Juniata College in Huntingdon.

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WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Robert Brown interviewed his son Jimmy, who loves history and has won a number of awards for his history presentations.

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Emily Reddy

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Curt Bierly and his son Stan talk about the family business, Stanley C. Bierly, in Millheim.

Across the country, budget cuts continue to cripple libraries. For WPSU, Melissa Bierly reports on one central Pennsylvania community’s effort to keep their library open.

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President Trump's tariffs on imported steel aren't the first time the industry has gotten protection from the U.S. government. Not by a long shot. In fact, tariff protection for the industry — which politicians often say is a vital national interest — goes back to the very beginning of the republic.

In his book, Clashing Over Commerce: A History of U.S. Trade Policy, Dartmouth professor Douglas Irwin writes that protection for the metal producers began in the 1790s.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Suspected pirates have seized 12 crewmembers of a Dutch-flagged cargo ship off the coast of Nigeria, the vessel's managing company confirmed Monday.

The 480-foot MV FWN Rapide was attacked on Saturday morning as it was approaching Port Harcourt, Nigeria, according to gCaptain, an industry website.

According to the ship's Automatic Identification System (AIS) tracking, it was bound from Takoradi, Ghana, to Bonny Island, Nigeria, at the time of the attack, gCaptain says.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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It's A Boy! Prince William And Duchess Catherine Welcome No. 3

The Royal Baby Watch is over. Prince William and Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, welcomed their third child, and second son, Monday morning just hours after arriving at St. Mary's Hospital in London. The baby's name has yet to be revealed, but Kensington Palace wants the public to know he's heavy and healthy. The newborn weighed in at 8 pounds, 7 ounces. He was born at 11:01 a.m. local time on St. George's Day, named for the patron saint of England who supposedly slayed a dragon some 1...

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Black Law Enforcement Organization Wants Implicit Bias Training 'Mandated' For Police

Theres ongoing distrust, anger and fear between communities of color and police, following a series of police shootings of unarmed black men. The shootings have sparked street protests, lawsuits, soul-searching and calls for change. Here & Now s Eric Westervelt ( @Ericnpr ) speaks with  Clarence Cox  ( @Cox_Chief ), president of the National Organization of Black Law Enforcement, about how its members are responding. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Flint Activist Wins Major Environmental Prize

A Flint activist who worked to expose the Michigan city's lead crisis is being hailed as an environmental hero. She's one of the winners of the 2018 Goldman Environmental Prize. The honor, announced on Monday , recognizes grass-roots environmental activists from around the world. Shortly after the city of Flint switched its water source to save money in April 2014, LeeAnne Walters spotted a rash on her twins. Walters is a mother of four, and when she and her children started experiencing...

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Mike Pompeo On Track To Be Confirmed As Secretary Of State

Updated at 6:35 p.m. ET Mike Pompeo is on track to become secretary of state after a key Republican senator gave a last-minute endorsement of the CIA director. The secretary of state-designate's nomination was approved by the Senate Foreign Relations Committee Monday night on a party-line vote. The vote was 10 Republicans for Pompeo, nine Democrats against. One Democrat voted present. There was some drama around the vote. Initially, Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. opposed the nomination of Pompeo but...

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Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract

As more states legalize marijuana, there's growing interest in a cannabis extract — cannabidiol, also known as CBD. It's marketed as a compound that can help relieve anxiety — and, perhaps, help ease aches and pains, too. Part of the appeal, at least for people who don't want to get high, is that CBD doesn't have the same mind-altering effects as marijuana, since it does not contain THC, the psychoactive component of the plant. "My customers are buying CBD [for] stress relief," says Richard...

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As American Awareness Fades, Holocaust Museum Refreshes The Story

A new exhibit that opens Monday at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum aims to honor a founding mission. Five years in the making, "Americans and the Holocaust" contextualizes attitudes in the U.S. during 1930s and '40s persecution and mass murder of Jews in Europe. Twenty-five years ago, when the building opened, noted Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel introduced the museum not as an answer to the horrors of genocide but to pose a glaring question: How could this happen? The American...

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'A Close Personal Relationship' Under Pressure As Trump Hosts France's Macron

President Trump will welcome French President Emmanuel Macron to the United States for an official state visit on Monday, in the latest sign of goodwill between the two leaders. The two got off to a rocky start after sharing a tense handshake at their first meeting at a NATO summit in Brussels last May. But since that shaky beginning, Trump and Macron have developed a surprisingly collegial bond. "It's no secret that President Trump and President Macron enjoy a good working relationship — I...

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Tiny Desk Concerts At 10: How One Miserable Show Led To A Magical Concert Series

Ten years ago today — on April 22, 2008 — NPR Music published our first Tiny Desk concert. Laura Gibson was the inspiration, and the event that sparked the idea of concerts at my desk came from NPR Music's Stephen Thompson. He and I were at the SXSW Music Festival, at one of those lousy shows where the audience chatter was louder than the performer. When Laura Gibson walked off the stage to talk with Stephen and me, we told her that we could barely hear a word she sang, and Stephen said...

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Teachers Share Anger, Frustration Over Grants Turned Into Loans

"I thought this just happened to me." That's the refrain from dozens of teachers who reached out to NPR — via email and social media — in response to our investigative story about serious problems with a federal grant program that, they say, have left them unfairly saddled with thousands of dollars of debts they shouldn't have to pay. The TEACH grant program offers prospective teachers up to $4,000 a year to help pay for an undergraduate or master's degree; in return, they agree to teach a...

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How Rhiannon Giddens Reconstructs Black Pain With The Banjo

Rhiannon Giddens isn't afraid to carry the weight of history in her music. The North Carolina singer-songwriter and banjoist is a founding member of the Grammy-winning group the Carolina Chocolate Drops which won both critical acclaim and loyal fans for their revival of the African-American string band tradition. 2017 was a big year for Giddens. She released Freedom Highway , a solo album of haunting songs inspired by slave narratives. She also received the prestigious MacArthur Fellowship,...

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'Art Of The Wasted Day' Makes A Case For Letting The Mind Wander

Patricia Hampl, you had me at your title: The Art of the Wasted Day. Imagine a book that celebrates daydreaming, that sees it not as a moral failing, but as an activity to be valued as an end in itself. To be clear, this is not a self-help book; nor is Hampl talking about meditation, yogic breathing or mindfulness — those worthy New Age practices that, well, have to be practiced . Instead, Hampl is intrigued by the kind of instinctual, floaty, aimless daydreaming that many of us — if we were...

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'Exorcist' Director Makes A New Movie About Exorcism (It's A Documentary)

When The Exorcist , based on the novel by William Blatty, came to theaters in 1973, it captured the public imagination. Or more accurately, the public's nightmares. Exorcisms aren't just the stuff of horror movies — hundreds of thousands of Italian Catholics reportedly request them each year. But when William Friedkin directed the movie, he'd never actually seen an exorcism. It would be four more decades before he actually witnessed one. Friedkin tracked down the late Rev. Gabriele Amorth,...

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Edible Oddities: David Bowie-Inspired Menus Reflect His Many Personas

Matthew Yokobosky finds food inspirational — which is perhaps not entirely surprising, considering that as an art curator, it's his job to make connections between seemingly disparate objects, just as a chef creates a cohesive dish out of contrasting ingredients. So when New York City restaurateur and chef Saul Bolton suggested developing a themed menu and a series of dinners around the "David Bowie I s" exhibition now on view at the Brooklyn Museum, Yokobosky was intrigued. "I was knee-deep...

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A 13-Year-Old In Afghanistan Won't Let His Injuries Get Him Down

Barkatullah is 13. He lost his right arm and leg in a mine explosion on May 2017. But that does not deter him from dreaming of a brighter future. "The policemen were among the people who rescued me and saved my life," he says on a chilly evening in the children's playground at the Emergency War and Trauma Hospital in Kabul. "That is what I want to do when I grow up." In Afghanistan, thousands of children each year are caught in the crossfire of ongoing violence. On Sunday, a suicide bomber...

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YOU DID IT!

WPSU listeners made more than $140,000 in donations to pay for the public radio programs you love! Thank you for a successful spring fund drive!

Congressional Candidates On WPSU-FM

Pennsylvania’s primary election is May 15, and WPSU-FM is talking with candidates in competitive races for the U.S. House in our listening area. Listen now through April 30 on Morning Edition.

WPSU's 2018 Election Coverage

Find candidate profiles, information on the newly drawn PA Congressional districts, resources on voter registration, and more on WPSU's Vote '18 web portal.

Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

The new map of Pennsylvania Congressional districts, released February 19 by the PA Supreme Court.
PA Supreme Court

Pa. Supreme Court Dramatically Overhauls State’s Congressional Map (Clickable Map Included)

The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has enacted a new congressional district map that onlookers say is much more favorable to Democrats, replacing one the court overturned and deemed an unconstitutional partisan gerrymander last month. Justices described the new map in their 48-page decision as “superior” to other proposals filed for their consideration. It’s more compact, they wrote, and splits only 13 counties — fewer than half the number divided in the 2011 map drawn in a process controlled by...

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Get The New Free WPSU App!

Take public media anywhere you go with the WPSU mobile app available for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android and Amazon devices.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

The Folk Show on WPSU-FM

Hear locally-hosted acoustic music on The Folk Show, Sunday nights from 10pm to midnight on WPSU-FM, and Saturdays from 1-5pm on WPSU 3 (to stream it, click LISTEN LIVE above, then select WPSU3).

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Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!