Uncertainty Reigns As GOP Scrambles To Avert A Government Shutdown

Updated at 6:45 p.m. ET The House is set to vote on a stop-gap funding bill Thursday evening to avert a government shutdown, and the body's most conservative bloc now appears on board to let the measure pass. But even if it does pass the House, the effort to keep the government funded past midnight Friday faces much tougher odds in the Senate. There Republicans need 60 votes to proceed on the four-week continuing resolution, which would only extend funding until February 16. That is looking...

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This I Believe: I Believe In Second Impressions

Apr 14, 2011

I was just shy of 17 the first time my brother Daniel introduced me to his girlfriend. Her name was Kristen, and I hated her immediately. But my brother loved her. Granted, I may not have known what love was, but in my teenage years, love meant a brother who would rather be with his girlfriend than with his siblings. Call it what you want *cough* jealously *cough*, but I wasn’t happy.

This I Believe: I Believe Life Should Be "Pun"derful

Mar 24, 2011

One morning, I called the local barbershop to make an appointment. Unfortunately, the barber was all booked up for the day. 

"Well, this is a hairy situation," I said to my girlfriend as I hung up the phone. She replied, "They certainly left you stranded." 

Call me a pundit, a glutton for punishment, or just a "pun"derful guy…I believe in puns. 

You want to spice up any conversation, here's some sage advice. Have a little fun with it. That's why it's called a “play on words” after all. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011
Essayist Lyndsie Wszola.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal.  

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal. 

Lyndsie Wszola is a Penn State student.

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

Penn State professor Alex Hristov
Emily Reddy / WPSU

It’s feeding time at an experimental dairy barn not far from Beaver stadium. A big square machine on wheels spits a pile of hay in front of each cow on one side of the barn, and lab assistant Chan Hee Lee pours a bucket of dried green leaf bits on top.

As the feeding machine finishes up and rolls out of the barn, Alex Hristov says they tried a lot of things before they found oregano reduced cows’ methane output.

“We started with essential oils,” Hristov said. “Lavender, mint. Citrus, onion, anything, you name it.

So why is Hristov focused on cutting methane?

This I Believe: I Believe In Heavy Metal

Mar 11, 2010

I believe heavy metal.
 
When I was 12 years old I saw Metallica’s music video for the song, “One.” The video mixes gritty black and white band footage with excerpts from the film Johnny Got His Gun about a hospitalized soldier who lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and speech to a landmine. Over this footage, “One” goes from lament to unstoppable barrage.
 
I believed this song.
 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

This I Believe: I Believe In Public Radio

Apr 2, 2009

For many people, April 15 is TAX DAY! April 15 for me, however, has a different significance…

In 1982, I moved to a small mountain town in Colorado. I thought I’d found the perfect place to live. But there was one thing missing. No public radio. I used to spin the FM dial searching for the voice of the community.  All I would hear was canned music or talk programs packaged somewhere far away and made local only by the commercials injected.

This I Believe: I Believe In Slowing Down

Feb 5, 2009

On a rainy morning when I was ten, my neighbor Mr. Lovett invited me into his home for a woodworking project. Above his fireplace sat an ornate eagle carved by Mr. Lovett himself. Its wingspan was wider than I was tall. I remember wondering how long it took him to make that eagle.

Mr. Lovett guided my block of wood under the scroll saw until it morphed into the rough outline of a duck.

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NPR Stories

For nearly a decade, Tune-Yards' Merrill Garbus has been known for drumming, strumming and dancing wildly onstage as she coaxes sound from a handful different instruments and a trusty loop pedal. While the signature sound of Tune-Yards is distinct, Garbus isn't one to put labels on her music.

"It's always the hardest thing," she says. "I appreciate how I'm allowed to maybe not classify the music I play because as soon as you do, assumptions begin to be made and you start shutting out people."

Based on a YA novel by Heidi McLaughlin, the endearingly old-fangled Forever My Girl is basically a stretched-out country music song with eye-catching Southern visuals and a familiar loop of lovelorn sorrow topped with uplift you can see coming from scene one.

Baltimore public schools' heating crisis earlier this month was a "day of reckoning" for the system, the city, and the state said public schools CEO Sonja Santelises. The crisis, she said in an interview with WYPR Wednesday, exposed the truth that Baltimore city school buildings are less than functional.

There's something unfair about comparing any policier to Michael Mann's Heat, even if you dissent from the popular — and one hundred percent correct — notion that Heat is the best cops-and-robbers movie ever made. For one thing, Heat is more like a movie-plus-expansion pack, a remake of a film Mann had written and directed for network television some years earlier, upgraded with a lavish budget and an A-list cast.

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Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

Updated at 12:39 p.m. ET Health care workers who want to refuse to treat patients because of religious or moral beliefs will have a new defender in the Trump administration. The top civil rights official at the Department of Health and Human Services is creating the Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in procedures like abortion or treat certain people because of moral or religious objections. "Never...

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From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: 2 Therapists Share Stories

Nora Baladerian and Karyn Harvey are both psychologists with an unusual specialty — they are among a small number of therapists who treat people with intellectual disabilities who have been the victims of sexual violence. They're friends, brought together by decades of shared experience. Baladerian, from Los Angeles, is a co-founder of the Disability and Abuse Project , which tracks violence against people with intellectual disabilities. Harvey now works at The Arc Baltimore , a local chapter...

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In Italy, #MeToo Falters Amid Public Scorn

In the months since allegations of sexual harassment by major media figures took center stage in the United States, the #MeToo movement has had a ripple effect in Europe, prompting national conversations on a once-taboo topic. In some countries, the movement has been embraced. But in Italy, the public has largely reacted with scorn and skepticism. One of the first women to accuse Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault was Italian actress Asia Argento. Hailed in the U.S. for speaking out, she was...

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2017 Among Warmest Years On Record

This past year, 2017, was among the warmest years on record, according to new data released by NASA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration. The planet's global surface temperature last year was the second highest since 1880, NASA says. NOAA calls it the third warmest year on record, because of slight variations in the ways that they analyze temperatures. Both put 2017 behind 2016's record temperatures. And "both analyses show that the five warmest years on record have all taken...

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Majority Of Americans See Trump's First Year As A Failure

As President Trump approaches the one-year anniversary of his inauguration, a majority of Americans think that his first year in office has been a failure and that he has divided the nation. NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll data released Thursday finds that Americans deemed Trump's first year a failure, 53 percent to 40 percent. And by an almost 2-to-1 ratio (61 percent to 32 percent), Americans said they believe Trump has divided the country since his election. Americans give Trump relatively...

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Repeated Head Hits, Not Just Concussions, May Lead To A Type Of Chronic Brain Damage

We live in an age of heightened awareness about concussions. From battlefields around the world to football fields in the U.S., we've heard about the dangers caused when the brain rattles around inside the skull and the possible link between concussions and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy . A number of high-profile NFL stars have developed CTE, and parents are increasingly worried about how concussions may affect their children who play sports. The injury even...

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Photographer Says He Lost His Job After Leaking Pictures Of Rick Perry And Coal CEO

A former Department of Energy photographer has filed a federal whistleblower suit alleging he lost his job after leaking photos of a private meeting between Energy Secretary Rick Perry and a major Trump donor who heads one of the country's largest mining companies. The photographer, Simon Edelman , took photos of the March 29, 2017, meeting between Perry and Robert "Bob" Murray, the CEO of Ohio-based Murray Energy, who gave $300,000 to the Trump campaign. The photographs show Perry and Murray...

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Cat Lovers, Is Your Cat Right- Or Left-Pawed?

You know your cats' cute habits, their distinct personalities and their likes and dislikes for food, play and affection. But could you say whether your cats are right-pawed or left-pawed? That is, have you noticed which paw they use first to step over a raised object or to step down the stairs? According to a new study published in the January issue of Animal Behaviour , cats show a version of handedness, the lateral bias that means 90 percent of us humans prefer using our right hand for...

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Apple Plans To Create 20,000 Jobs And Build New Campus

Apple announced in a statement on Wednesday that it plans to accelerate U.S. investment and create thousands of new jobs. For years Apple Inc. has been criticized for outsourcing manufacturing to China. Apple says it plans to bring back billions of dollars it has kept in tax havens overseas, and that it will pay a one-time tax of $38 billion on its overseas cash holdings. NPR's Laura Sydell reports that Apple has kept some $250 billion outside the U.S.: "Apple CEO Tim Cook has been a critic...

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House Intel Panel Votes To Release Its Fusion GPS Transcript

Updated at 3:56 p.m. ET The House Intelligence Committee decided on Thursday to release the transcript of its meeting with the man who commissioned the infamous Trump-Russia dossier. Lawmakers used a closed meeting to vote about whether to unveil the text of hours' worth of testimony by Glenn Simpson, founder of the private intelligence firm Fusion GPS. The committee posted it later in the day and it is available online here . The testimony shows that Simpson gave the committee a road map of...

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Sugar And Sleep: More Rest May Dull Your Sweet Tooth

Listen up, night owls: If you're sleeping six or fewer hours per night, you're not doing your health any favors. A new study finds that getting the recommended seven to nine hours of sleep per night may help you tame your sweet tooth. Researchers at King's College London recruited "short sleepers" — that is, people who routinely sleep less than seven hours per night. The participants were coached on strategies to extend sleep time, such as cutting back on caffeine, reducing screen time and...

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Black Holes: Where Reality Beats Fiction

Last week, the PBS series Nova presented an episode on black holes , these most mysterious and mind-boggling physical objects. Hosted by astrophysicist Janna Levin from Barnard College in New York, the episode was truly fantastic. Very clear science and stunning graphics. Levin was gracious and fun, the kind of benevolent teacher you want for your kids. The text was tight, with the narration closely following the quotes from the many invited guests. And the science, of course, was nothing...

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Scientists Edge Closer To A Blood Test To Detect Cancers

Researchers say they have taken a step toward developing a blood test that would detect eight common cancers, possibly even before symptoms appear. As they report Thursday in the journal Science, they're hoping their idea would eventually lead to a $500 test that can screen for cancer and identify people with the disease when it's in its earliest stages and more treatable. But they have a long way to go. There have been many attempts over the decades to develop blood tests to screen for...

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A Former Neo-Nazi Explains Why Hate Drew Him In — And How He Got Out

Christian Picciolini was 14 years old when he attended the first gathering of what would become the Hammerskin Nation, a violent, white-power skinhead group. Looking back, he describes his introduction to the group as receiving a "lifeline of acceptance." "I felt a sort of energy flow through me that I had never felt before — as if I was a part of something greater than myself," he says. Picciolini embraced the white supremacist message he heard that day and went on to front a white-power...

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What Does It Take To Make A Living Posting Travel Photos On Social Media?

Collette and Scott Stohler gave up their respective careers in engineering and ad production to become travel influencers charging tourism boards, hotels, adventure companies and others a fee to post pictures and videos (mostly of themselves) in the exotic location of the companys choice, on their own social media , under the name Roamaroo . The benefits are unlimited travel and adventure . But its not easy, either. Here & Now s Robin Young learns more from the Stohlers about what it takes...

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Strange Weather Triggered Bacteria That Killed 200,000 Endangered Antelope

Over the span of three weeks in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in central Kazakhstan. Scientists knew that bacteria called Pasteurella multocida type B caused the mass death. Now, new research suggests that the bacteria was already present in the animals; it was triggered and became harmful because of a period of unusual weather. Richard Kock, a professor of Wildlife Health and Emerging Diseases at The Royal Veterinary College, witnessed the "rapidly accelerating death."...

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Take Note: Rural Education

Friday at 1:00pm. Keystone Crossroads education reporter Kevin McCorry talks about his recent reporting series on rural education.

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NPR One: An Award-Winning Cross-Platform Experience

Since launching NPR One in 2014, we've been working to deliver a news and storytelling experience that meets users in all the places they are now and will be in the future. For the Digital Media team, this has meant designing and building focused, yet flexible apps for smartphones, smart TVs, car infotainment systems, wearable devices, voice platforms, and more. That's why we were honored to learn that Google has named NPR One the winner of the 2017 Material Design Award for Platform...

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Reasons To Stay

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