Rand Paul Puts Government On Path For Temporary Lapse In Funding At Midnight

Updated at 10:47 p.m. ET It seems all but certain that the non-essential operations of the government could shutter for at least a few hours overnight after Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., repeatedly objected to a Senate vote in order to air his grievances over what he calls runaway federal spending. Paul faced off with Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, the Senate majority whip, just after 10 p.m. on the Senate floor and blocked multiple attempts by Cornyn to hold a vote on funding legislation before 1 a.m....

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President Obama, at the start of a four-stop trip to Asia, sought to reassure Japan that the U.S. is on its side in a dispute with China over the tiny Senkaku islands chain, which has led to bluster and naval jockeying between the two countries in recent years.

Growing up in West Virginia in the 1960s and '70s, Susan Brown would have a slice of salt rising bread, toasted, for Saturday morning breakfast. Her grandmother baked the bread with the mysterious and misleading name.

There's little or no salt in the recipe. No yeast, either. The bread rises because of bacteria in the potatoes or cornmeal and the flour that goes into the starter.

The taste is as distinctive as the recipe. Salt rising bread is dense and white, with a fine crumb and cheese-like flavor.

Thousands of nonviolent drug offenders serving time in federal prison could be eligible to apply for early release under new clemency guidelines announced Wednesday by the Justice Department.

Details of the initiative, which would give President Obama more options under which he could grant clemency to drug offenders serving long prison sentences, were announced by Deputy Attorney General James Cole.

An American journalist operating in eastern Ukraine has been kidnapped by pro-Russian gunmen, the separatists said Wednesday.

Simon Ostrovsky, working for Vice News, was seized at gunpoint early Tuesday by masked men in the restive eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to go back to a story that we've turned to a number of times on this program. We're talking about the move in many countries in Africa to toughen legal penalties and increase the stigma against homosexuality.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Finally today, let's hear from a model and actress who also has Nigerian roots, Yaya Alafia. Last year was a breakout year for her with meaty roles in critically acclaimed films including Lee Daniels' "The Butler" and Andrew Dosunmu's "Mother of George." And she had a baby.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now we turn to education for the youngest Americans. We're talking preschool here. President Obama has challenged the country to provide what he calls high-quality preschool for all 4-year-olds. He mentioned this in his last two State of the Union addresses. Here he is earlier this year.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

The Joys Of Spoiling

Apr 23, 2014

In the age of the Internet, the act of spoiling is easier than ever before. Through live-tweeting and message boards and comments sections, the information is out there and spreads quickly.

But why do some people enjoy revealing certain information about stories — surprises and finales and more — before others have had the opportunity to experience it?

We could tell you what we think now. But that would spoil the rest of this story.

Spoliation Nation

"A Rio de Janeiro slum erupted in violence late Tuesday following the killing of a popular local figure, with angry residents setting fires and showering homemade explosives and glass bottles onto a busy avenue in the city's main tourist zone," The Associated Press writes.

I Believe in Gratitude

Apr 18, 2014
Wagner This I Believe
Johanna Wagner

In the summer of 2012, I had a lot for which to be grateful. My husband and I were expecting our first child in early September. As an anxious mother-to-be I spent those early summer months devouring books, movies, articles and just about anything I could find about babies and those first crucial weeks. I was thrilled and terrified imagining what it would be like in a few short months. Never once did I think that I might not be there to experience it myself. 

Pages

NPR Stories

Updated at 2 a.m. ET

Two hours into a government shutdown, the Senate passed a $300 billion bipartisan budget agreement to keep the government funded after a filibuster by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., who objected to what he said is its out of control spending.

But it still must get through the House.

With a 71-28 vote in the Senate, the measure faces a far from certain outcome in the House, amid the chaos that's forced a second shutdown in three weeks.

It's the biggest smorgasbord on TV. NBC and its related platforms are serving up more than 2,400 hours of Olympics coverage through the closing ceremony on Feb. 25 — a record for a Winter Olympics. It's all there in front of you, but figuring out what you want and when you want it is a challenge. Here are a few ideas on sorting through it all:

How To Watch On TV

Sanura Begum misses her family's farm back in Myanmar.

She's 20, with rich brown eyes. In August, she joined the hundreds of thousands of Rohingya refugees fleeing their homeland.

An NBA superstar, a Disney powerhouse and a beloved children's book author make up some of the Oscar nominees for best animated short this year, and you can watch them all in theaters before the ceremony.

Here's a story that might convince you that paying attention to your grammar lessons might one day put money in your pocket.

Thanks to the absence of the comma in the wording of a state law laying out what activities qualify a worker for overtime pay, more than 120 drivers for the Oakhurst Dairy in Portland, Maine, are eligible to share a $5 million legal settlement announced today.

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Rand Paul Puts Government On Path For Temporary Lapse In Funding At Midnight

Updated at 10:47 p.m. ET It seems all but certain that the non-essential operations of the government could shutter for at least a few hours overnight after Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., repeatedly objected to a Senate vote in order to air his grievances over what he calls runaway federal spending. Paul faced off with Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, the Senate majority whip, just after 10 p.m. on the Senate floor and blocked multiple attempts by Cornyn to hold a vote on funding legislation before 1 a.m....

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Tracking Shows Russian Meddling Efforts Evolving Ahead Of 2018 Midterms

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson sounded an alarm this week: The Russians are already meddling in the 2018 midterm elections. "The point is that if their intention is to interfere, they're going to find ways to do that," Tillerson told Fox News. "I think it's important we just continue to say to Russia, look, you think we don't see what you're doing. We do see it, and you need to stop." A new poll shows that a clear majority of Americans believe Russia will try to meddle in the next U.S....

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Building A Latino-Muslim Coalition With #TacoTrucksAtEveryMosque

The connection between Middle Eastern and Mexican food goes all the way back to the Moors, and is well-known in culinary circles. Al pastor tacos are just a pork version of the shawarma spits that Lebanese immigrants brought with them to Mexico City in the 1930s. In nearby Puebla, a wrap called tacos árabes — Arabic tacos — uses a flatbread that's halfway between pita and lavash. Kibbe (fried meatballs made from bulghur wheat) is popular in the Yucatán, thanks to Syrians who settled in the...

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White House 'Could Have Done Better' In Response To Abuse Allegations Against Staffer

Updated at 6:40 p.m. ET The White House says it "could have done better" in its handling of allegations of domestic abuse against former staff secretary Rob Porter. Principal deputy press secretary Raj Shah on Thursday called the allegations "troubling" and insisted White House officials took them seriously while suggesting that any missteps in their response were because the "emerging reports were not reflective of the individual who we had come to know." Porter resigned Wednesday amid...

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U.S. Curling Team Beats Russian Athletes To Kick Off Pyeongchang Olympics

The opening ceremony for the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics will take place Friday, but the first competitions are already underway. The U.S. curling team of Matt and Becca Hamilton led off a mixed doubles tournament by defeating a team from Russia. There was a smattering of applause for each team as they were announced. The loudest cheers were reserved for the host South Korean team, which was also on the ice as part of the mixed-doubles tournament at the Gangneung Curling Center. The Russians...

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'The Line Becomes A River' Chronicles Life In The Border Patrol

Early in The Line Becomes a River , Francisco Cantú tells his mother his reasons for joining the Border Patrol. "Maybe it's the desert, maybe it's the closeness of life and death, maybe it's the tension between the two cultures we carry inside us. Whatever it is, I'll never understand it unless I'm close to it." It's surreal dialogue, the sort of thing that feels like a promise and only later turns out to be an omen. And like all Cantú's dialogue, it weaves in and out of paragraphs without...

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Eagles Parade: Philly Celebrates Its Super Bowl Win As Only Philly Can

The Philadelphia Eagles won their first Super Bowl just four days ago, and there was plenty of celebrating on Sunday night. But Thursday morning brought the main event: The Eagles Parade. Fans began thronging the parade route at dawn. The line at the Wawa convenience store near the Philadelphia Museum of Art stretched around the block by 6 a.m., the Inquirer reports . The parade ends at the museum, famous for the steps that Rocky climbed in the greatest training montage of all time. "It's the...

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In 'The 15:17 To Paris,' 3 'Ordinary Guys' Relive The Train Attack They Thwarted

In August 2015, Anthony Sadler , Alek Skarlatos and Spencer Stone helped thwart a terrorist attack on a high-speed train bound for Paris. They now play themselves in a new Clint Eastwood film about the incident, The 15:17 to Paris. The film follows the three men growing up together, going their separate ways as adults and then reuniting on vacation in Europe. Sadler, Skarlatos and Stone were praised for their role in subduing a terrorist on a train from Amsterdam to Paris, who was armed with...

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Olympians Next Door: Where America's Winter Olympic Athletes Come From

The 242 athletes who will represent the U.S. in the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics come from 32 states, from Alaska to Florida. And while powerhouse winter sports states like Colorado and California are sending the most Olympians to South Korea, cities and towns around the U.S. have good reason to watch their daughters and sons compete as well. Seven American Olympians are from Anchorage, Alaska; five are from Duluth, Minn. Those two cities join Park City, Utah, (eight Olympians) and Steamboat...

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California May Have A Way To Block Trump's Offshore Drilling Push

More than a dozen states oppose the Trump administration's proposal to open up nearly the entire U.S. coastline to offshore oil leasing. Federal officials will get public feedback on the plan in Sacramento on Thursday. The Interior Department says it takes local concerns into account — as happened in a recent controversial move with Florida — but states have no direct say, since the leasing would take place in federally controlled waters. California thinks it may have found a way around. In...

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Colorado Officials Credit Wildlife Crossings For Fewer Animal-Related Accidents

The Colorado Department of Transportation has found that wildlife crossings are reducing animal-related car crashes by in some cases up to 90 percent. Here & Now s Robin Young learns more from Mark Lawler , biologist with the Colorado Department of Transportation. Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Tax Cuts Put Oklahoma In A Bind. Now Gov. Fallin Wants To Raise Taxes

Oklahoma taxpayers are fed up. Riding high on the oil boom of the late 2000s, the state followed the Kansas model and slashed taxes. But the promised prosperity never came. In many cases, it was just the opposite. Around 20 percent of Oklahoma's schools now hold classes just four days a week. Last year, Highway Patrol officers were given a mileage limit because the state couldn't afford to put gas in their tanks. Medicaid provider rates have been cut to the point that rural nursing homes and...

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How To Pack A Space Telescope

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLGDkhp28rI As complicated as it as to launch and operate a telescope in space, it's almost as complex to move a space telescope around here on Earth. For the past 9 months or so, NASA has been testing the James Webb Space Telescope in a giant cryogenic chamber at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The $8.8 billion Webb telescope is the most powerful telescope NASA has ever built. To say astronomers are looking forward to the launch of the Webb telescope...

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For February, 3 Swooningly Romantic Reads

In real life, we tend to think of romance as flowers, wine and Hallmark cards. But in a romance novel, it's a wicked wager with a hot rogue, a fake date that becomes a very serious fling, or a passionate love affair with a dangerous man. For this oh-so romantic month, here are three genuinely romantic novels to enjoy — flowers and wine optional. The Wedding Date by Jasmine Guillory begins with a classic rom com setup: Man is stuck in an elevator with an attractive woman, so he invites her to...

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Alabama Targets OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma In Opioid Suit

Alabama filed a lawsuit in federal court on Tuesday against OxyContin producer Purdue Pharma LP claiming the drug company is fueling the opioid epidemic by deceptively marketing prescription painkillers. The state alleges that Purdue failed to accurately portray the risks and benefits of opioids, which enabled doctors to widely prescribe them in the treatment of pain. Alabama becomes the latest in a flood of lawsuits by states, counties and cities against drug makers in response to the opioid...

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Mister Rogers Is Coming Back To Your Neighborhood, On A Stamp

The U.S. Postal Service has announced that it will release a Forever Stamp featuring America's favorite neighbor, television icon Mister Rogers. The title character of the half-hour children's educational television series Mister Rogers' Neighborhood , Fred Rogers "was known as a beloved television neighbor to generations of children," a statement from USPS said. The stamp is scheduled to be unveiled March 23, 50 years after the original episode of the series aired in the U.S. in 1968. Rogers...

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Coffee Or Tea: In Dickens' World, It Might Be A Choice Between Good And Evil

The eccentric, angelic, villainous and beguiling characters populating the teeming novels of Charles Dickens — whose birthday is today — are constantly inviting one another to tea. Not all of them, however, drink tea. Some prefer coffee. A harmless preference, you might say. Not so fast, says British food historian Pen Vogler , who has a whimsical but rather wonderful theory to offer about the Victorian author's various characters' moral fiber based on who drinks what beverage. According to...

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WPSU's Annual Art for the Airwaves Contest

Submit your artwork, reflecting life in Central or Northern Pennsylvania, by 5:00pm on February 28. You'll find contest details at the link below.

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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

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Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!