Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

Updated at 12:39 p.m. ET Health care workers who want to refuse to treat patients because of religious or moral beliefs will have a new defender in the Trump Administration. The top civil rights official at the Department of Health and Human Services is creating the Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in procedures like abortion, or treat certain people because of moral or religious objections. "Never...

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WPSU Jazz Archive - April 18, 2014

Apr 18, 2014

An archive recording of WPSU Jazz program broadcast on April 18, 2014 with Greg Halpin.

 

Today’s guest, Jeffry Wert, is a historian and author who specializes in the American Civil War. He's written nine books about the Civil War. His book, Gettysburg--Day Three, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. Wert also taught at Penns Valley Area High School for more than three decades. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked with him about his career as an author and teacher.

Packing for Mars by Mary Roach

Apr 10, 2014
Burks BookMark
Hannah Burks

Centre County Reads is an organization that encourages county residents of all ages to read and discuss the same book. This year’s pick is Mary Roach’s Packing for Mars. Our reviewer, Hannah Burks, is the undergraduate intern for the Center for American Literary Studies at Penn State.

 Bob Zellner’s story starts about as far as you can get from where it ended up. Born in lower Alabama, his father, uncles and grandfather were robe-wearing members of the Ku Klux Klan. In his inspirational memoir, "The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement,” he chronicles his journey to become one of the first white southerners in the early civil rights movement.

I Believe in Cars

Apr 3, 2014
Hoffman
Kate Lao Shaffner

“Mitch, why are you such a knucklehead?” my dad says as he follows me out of our house and into the front yard. “Only a complete idiot would do something this stupid. Sometimes I wonder what goes on in that head of yours…” SLAM! My dad’s voice is suddenly cut off by the reassuring thunk of my car door. I jam the key into the ignition and start the engine. Before my dad even has a chance to finish his sentence, I’m turning out of the driveway, leaving him behind. I lift the clutch and hit the gas; first gear, I can feel the stress starting to melt away as the RPMs increase.

Renowned futurist and New York Times best-selling author Peter Diamandis advises the world’s top CEOs on how to make the most of what he calls exponential technologies. April 1, he’ll be the keynote speaker at Penn State’s Shaping the Future Summit on the Impact of Innovation. WPSU’s Patty Satalia finds out why he’s so optimistic about the future.

Wolf BookMark
Cindy Wolf

Longtime State College resident Cindy Wolf reviews Notes from Inside a Burst Bubble: Penn Staters on the Sandusky Scandal. The collection of essays, blog posts, and news articles is edited by Sheila Squillante and Dave Housley.  

WPSU's Beyond the Classroom examines innovative student learning that isn't bound by university walls. Penn State University is embracing this concept in an initiative it’s calling "Engaged Scholarship." WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports the inaugural Engaged Scholarship Symposium was held at the Nittany Lion Inn yesterday.  

Pyramid
Steven Granich

  WPSU's Beyond the Classroom is our series featuring students engaging in hands-on experiences outside university walls. Today, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner takes us to Lock Haven University, where a group of students are traveling abroad as a class. The university will soon require all students to fulfill a global awareness requirement.

In case you were wondering what Ethiopian Pop music of the 60’s & 70’s would sound like blended with jazz and funk - . wonder no more! WPSU’s Kristine Allen says the answer can be found when Debo Band plays a concert in the Juniata Presents Series at Juniata College in Huntingdon.

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Looking back on Common's gripping Tiny Desk performance at the White House in 2016, I recall a couple of prophetic moments. The first was that the rapper confessed his desire for an Emmy Award while fixated on Bob Boilen's trophy on the desk in front of him.

In the competition for Amazon's second headquarters, just 20 metropolitan areas remain in the running.

Last year, Amazon set off a hyper-competitive proposal process, saying that it plans to invest $5 billion in building a second headquarters that could create up to 50,000 high-paying jobs.

The Seattle-based company, which is a financial supporter of NPR, says it reviewed 238 proposals in the U.S., Mexico and Canada. Here are the metropolitan areas that made the cut:

2017 was among the warmest years on record, according to new data released by NASA and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration.

The planet's global surface temperature last year was second warmest since 1880, NASA says. NOAA calls it the third warmest year on record, due to slight variation in the ways that they analyze temperatures.

Both put 2017 behind 2016's record temperatures. And "both analyses show that the five warmest years on record have all taken place since 2010," NASA said in a press release.

Updated at 12:20 PM

President Trump injected fresh confusion into tense negotiations to avert an impending government shutdown with a morning tweet that indicated he opposed the House stop-gap funding bill.

"CHIP should be part of a long term solution, not a 30 Day, or short term, extension!" Trump tweeted Thursday morning. The House funding bill includes a six-year renewal of the popular Children's Health Insurance Program, which GOP leaders included as a potential sweetener to get the votes they need to pass the stop-gap measure.

Updated at 12:39 p.m. ET

Health care workers who want to refuse to treat patients because of religious or moral beliefs will have a new defender in the Trump Administration.

The top civil rights official at the Department of Health and Human Services is creating the Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in procedures like abortion, or treat certain people because of moral or religious objections.

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Majority Of Americans See Trump's First Year As A Failure

As President Trump approaches the one-year anniversary of his inauguration, a majority of Americans think his first year in office has been a failure — and that he's divided the nation. A new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds that by a 53-to-40-percent margin, Americans deemed Trump's first year a failure. And by an almost 2-to-1 margin (61 to 32 percent), Americans said they believe Trump has divided the country since his election. Americans give Trump relatively positive marks on his...

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Bannon And Trump White House Raising Questions About Executive Privilege, Lawyers Say

Former White House strategist Steve Bannon frustrated lawmakers this week when he declined to answer many of their questions about his time in the Trump administration. To hear members of the House Intelligence Committee tell it, Bannon was using the concept of executive privilege to evade legitimate oversight from Congress. At the podium Wednesday, White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders disagreed. "This White House is following the same practice that many before us have, that...

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Kelly Says Trump Now Believes Border Wall Is Unnecessary

Updated at 8:25 a.m. ET White House Chief of Staff John Kelly told a caucus of Hispanic lawmakers on Wednesday that he has persuaded President Trump that building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border is unnecessary, signaling a possible reversal on the key campaign promise. Kelly, who was secretary of Homeland Security before taking over as chief of staff in July, said that candidate Trump had not been "fully informed" about the border situation when he pledged repeatedly on the campaign trail...

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Photographer Says He Lost His Job After Leaking Pictures Of Rick Perry And Coal CEO

A former Department of Energy photographer has filed a federal whistleblower suit alleging he lost his job after leaking photos of a private meeting between Energy Secretary Rick Perry and a major Trump donor who heads one of the country's largest mining companies. The photographer, Simon Edelman , took photos of the March 29, 2017, meeting between Perry and Robert "Bob" Murray, the CEO of Ohio-based Murray Energy, who gave $300,000 to the Trump campaign. The photographs show Perry and Murray...

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Apple Plans To Create 20,000 Jobs And Build New Campus

Apple announced in a statement on Wednesday that it plans to accelerate U.S. investment and create thousands of new jobs. For years Apple Inc. has been criticized for outsourcing manufacturing to China. Apple says it plans to bring back billions of dollars it has kept in tax havens overseas, and that it will pay a one-time tax of $38 billion on its overseas cash holdings. NPR's Laura Sydell told Kelly McEvers, host of All Things Considered , that Apple has kept some $250 billion outside the U...

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Another Fusion GPS Transcript? House Intel Panel Votes On Whether To Unveil It

Updated at 7:45 a.m. ET The House Intelligence Committee is set to decide on Thursday whether to release the transcript of its meeting with the man who commissioned the infamous Trump-Russia dossier. Lawmakers have scheduled a closed meeting at which they'll vote about whether to unveil the text of hours' worth of testimony by Glenn Simpson, founder of the private intelligence firm Fusion GPS. The testimony will show that Simpson gave the committee a road map of names, places and leads that...

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Russian Athletes Withdraw From Competition When Drug Testers Arrive

More than 30 Russian athletes participating in Siberian Indoor Championships last weekend abruptly withdrew from competition when drug testers arrived at the event. According to the Russian sports website Championat, as many as 36 athletes cited various illnesses for withdrawing from the competition at the city of Irkutsk. Last month, Russian athletes were banned from competing under their nation's flag in the Winter Olympics that begin next month following allegations of a state-sponsored...

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Wes Studi On His Cherokee Nation Childhood And How He Discovered Acting

The new film Hostiles tells the story of a U.S. Army captain in the Old West circa 1892. He's spent decades fighting Native Americans and seeing his friends killed, and he's ordered to commit an act of humanitarian relief. The bitter veteran, played by Christian Bale, is tasked with escorting an old Cheyenne chief, played by Wes Studi, back to his home valley to die. In the film, Studi only speaks a few words of English. His character's most powerful moments come when he conveys meaning with...

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National Parks 'At Risk,' Former Interior Secretary Says Amid Advisory Board Resignations

The majority of the National Park Service advisory board has resigned in protest over Interior Secretary Ryan Zinkes unwillingness to meet with them. They were appointed by former President Obama, and their terms were supposed to conclude in May. Among the nine members resigning was former Alaska Gov. Tony Knowles, who wrote in his resignation letter to Zinke that he has profound concern that the mission of the national parks has been set aside. The Interior Department responded to the...

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From The Frontlines Of A Sexual Assault Epidemic: 2 Therapists Share Stories

Nora Baladerian and Karyn Harvey are both psychologists with an unusual specialty — they are among a small number of therapists who treat people with intellectual disabilities who have been the victims of sexual violence. They're friends, brought together by decades of shared experience. Baladerian, from Los Angeles, is a co-founder of the Disability and Abuse Project , which tracks violence against people with intellectual disabilities. Harvey now works at The Arc Baltimore , a local chapter...

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Black Holes: Where Reality Beats Fiction

Last week, the PBS series Nova presented an episode on black holes , these most mysterious and mind-boggling physical objects. Hosted by astrophysicist Janna Levin from Barnard College in New York, the episode was truly fantastic. Very clear science and stunning graphics. Levin was gracious and fun, the kind of benevolent teacher you want for your kids. The text was tight, with the narration closely following the quotes from the many invited guests. And the science, of course, was nothing...

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Could The Democrats Take Control Of Congress In 2018?

With guest host John Harwood. The 2018 midterms are shaping up to be a nationwide referendum on President Trump. Is control of Congress in reach for the Democrats? We’ll dig in. This show airs Wednesday at 10 a.m. EST. Guests: Amy Walter , national editor, Cook Political Report. ( @amyewalter ) Meredith Kelly , communications director, Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. ( @meredithk27 ) Matt Gorman , communications director, National Republican Congressional Committee. ( ...

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Opioid Crisis Blamed For Sharp Increase In Accidental Deaths In U.S.

Accidental deaths in the United States rose significantly in 2016, becoming the third-leading cause of fatalities for the first time in more than a century – a trend fueled by the steep rise in opioid overdoses, the National Safety Council reports. Accidents — defined by the council as unintentional, preventable injuries — claimed a record 161,374 lives in 2016, a 10 percent increase over 2015. They include motor vehicle crashes, falls, drowning, choking and poisoning, a category that...

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What Does It Take To Make A Living Posting Travel Photos On Social Media?

Collette and Scott Stohler gave up their respective careers in engineering and ad production to become travel influencers charging tourism boards, hotels, adventure companies and others a fee to post pictures and videos (mostly of themselves) in the exotic location of the companys choice, on their own social media , under the name Roamaroo . The benefits are unlimited travel and adventure . But its not easy, either. Here & Now s Robin Young learns more from the Stohlers about what it takes...

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Strange Weather Triggered Bacteria That Killed 200,000 Endangered Antelope

Over the span of three weeks in 2015, more than 200,000 saiga antelope suddenly died in central Kazakhstan. Scientists knew that bacteria called Pasteurella multocida type B caused the mass death. Now, new research suggests that the bacteria was already present in the animals; it was triggered and became harmful because of a period of unusual weather. Richard Kock, a professor of Wildlife Health and Emerging Diseases at The Royal Veterinary College, witnessed the "rapidly accelerating death."...

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Trump Admin Will Protect Health Workers Who Refuse Services On Religious Grounds

Updated at 12:39 p.m. ET Health care workers who want to refuse to treat patients because of religious or moral beliefs will have a new defender in the Trump Administration. The top civil rights official at the Department of Health and Human Services is creating the Division of Conscience and Religious Freedom to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who refuse to take part in procedures like abortion, or treat certain people because of moral or religious objections. "Never...

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Take Note: Rural Education

Friday at 1:00pm. Keystone Crossroads education reporter Kevin McCorry talks about his recent reporting series on rural education.

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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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NPR One: An Award-Winning Cross-Platform Experience

Since launching NPR One in 2014, we've been working to deliver a news and storytelling experience that meets users in all the places they are now and will be in the future. For the Digital Media team, this has meant designing and building focused, yet flexible apps for smartphones, smart TVs, car infotainment systems, wearable devices, voice platforms, and more. That's why we were honored to learn that Google has named NPR One the winner of the 2017 Material Design Award for Platform...

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Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

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