Thousands Of Hondurans Waiting For Word On Special Permission To Stay In U.S.

Some 86,000 Hondurans remain in limbo after the acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Elaine Duke, couldn't decided whether to extend or cancel their permission to stay in the U.S. But the department has given about 5,300 Nicaraguans notice that they have just over a year before they have to leave. The two groups are covered under Temporary Protected Status which allows them to live and work in the U.S. after a storm ripped through their home countries while they were...

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A Small Texas Town Mourns An Enormous Loss, In Photos

Sutherland Springs is a small South Texas town, about 45 minutes southeast of San Antonio. On Sunday morning, some of its residents went to services at the First Baptist Church downtown. Then a gunman shattered the calm of the morning. Devin Patrick Kelley, a 26-year-old from New Braunfels, a city 35 miles north, arrived dressed in black, wearing body armor and firing an assault-style rifle. He shot at the church building itself. And then he went inside and fired on the worshippers. He killed...

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Thousands of nonviolent drug offenders serving time in federal prison could be eligible to apply for early release under new clemency guidelines announced Wednesday by the Justice Department.

Details of the initiative, which would give President Obama more options under which he could grant clemency to drug offenders serving long prison sentences, were announced by Deputy Attorney General James Cole.

An American journalist operating in eastern Ukraine has been kidnapped by pro-Russian gunmen, the separatists said Wednesday.

Simon Ostrovsky, working for Vice News, was seized at gunpoint early Tuesday by masked men in the restive eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk.



I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to go back to a story that we've turned to a number of times on this program. We're talking about the move in many countries in Africa to toughen legal penalties and increase the stigma against homosexuality.



Finally today, let's hear from a model and actress who also has Nigerian roots, Yaya Alafia. Last year was a breakout year for her with meaty roles in critically acclaimed films including Lee Daniels' "The Butler" and Andrew Dosunmu's "Mother of George." And she had a baby.



Now we turn to education for the youngest Americans. We're talking preschool here. President Obama has challenged the country to provide what he calls high-quality preschool for all 4-year-olds. He mentioned this in his last two State of the Union addresses. Here he is earlier this year.


The Joys Of Spoiling

Apr 23, 2014

In the age of the Internet, the act of spoiling is easier than ever before. Through live-tweeting and message boards and comments sections, the information is out there and spreads quickly.

But why do some people enjoy revealing certain information about stories — surprises and finales and more — before others have had the opportunity to experience it?

We could tell you what we think now. But that would spoil the rest of this story.

Spoliation Nation

"A Rio de Janeiro slum erupted in violence late Tuesday following the killing of a popular local figure, with angry residents setting fires and showering homemade explosives and glass bottles onto a busy avenue in the city's main tourist zone," The Associated Press writes.

I Believe in Gratitude

Apr 18, 2014
Wagner This I Believe
Johanna Wagner

In the summer of 2012, I had a lot for which to be grateful. My husband and I were expecting our first child in early September. As an anxious mother-to-be I spent those early summer months devouring books, movies, articles and just about anything I could find about babies and those first crucial weeks. I was thrilled and terrified imagining what it would be like in a few short months. Never once did I think that I might not be there to experience it myself. 

WPSU Jazz Archive - April 18, 2014

Apr 18, 2014

An archive recording of WPSU Jazz program broadcast on April 18, 2014 with Greg Halpin.


Today’s guest, Jeffry Wert, is a historian and author who specializes in the American Civil War. He's written nine books about the Civil War. His book, Gettysburg--Day Three, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. Wert also taught at Penns Valley Area High School for more than three decades. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked with him about his career as an author and teacher.


NPR Stories

Some 86,000 Hondurans remain in limbo after the acting secretary of the Department of Homeland Security, Elaine Duke, couldn't decided whether to extend or cancel their permission to stay in the U.S. But the department has given about 5,300 Nicaraguans notice that they have just over a year before they have to leave.

The two groups are covered under Temporary Protected Status which allows them to live and work in the U.S. after a storm ripped through their home countries while they were already here.

Just four days before the release of her newest album, a letter from Taylor Swift's attorney demanding that a website retract and delete an article critical of Swift has drawn a sharp (but also winking) rebuke from the American Civil Liberties Union.

Staying up until the early hours of the morning with friends. Skipping sleep to prepare for an exam. These are fairly standard aspects of student life for many young people.

But these sorts of all-nighters pale in comparison to the stunt Randy Gardner pulled when he was 17.

The bodies of 26 Nigerian women were recovered from the Mediterranean Sea, and Italian prosecutors are probing whether their deaths are linked to sex trafficking.

"Salvatore Malfi, the police prefect of the southern town of Salerno, said the 26 women may have been thrown off their rubber dinghy into the waters of the Mediterranean," NPR's Sylvia Poggioli reports from Rome. "The cause of death appears to be by drowning."

Sutherland Springs, Texas, is a small town.

"They say the population is 400 and that's if you count every dog, cat and armadillo," 75-year-old L.G. Moore told The Associated Press. "It's more like 200 people." He runs an RV park a quarter mile from the First Baptist Church of Sutherland Springs.

Get More NPR News

The Paradise Papers: Revelations Spring From Leaked Records Of World's Wealthy U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Britain's Queen Elizabeth and a key ally to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau are among the 120 rich and powerful people mentioned in the Paradise Papers, a new release of data about offshore tax havens and obscure financial dealings. The Paradise Papers are a massive trove of 13.4 million records — many of which were leaked from the offshore law firm Appleby, which was founded more than 100 years ago and...

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Baby's Got Mail: Free Books Boost Early Literacy

"A busybody." That's how Raven Judd describes her 10-month-old daughter Bailey. "She loves tummy time. She likes to roll over. She'd dive if you let her," says the 27-year-old mother from Washington, D.C. There is one thing, though, that will get her baby girl to stop what she's doing: when her mother reads her favorite book, the aptly named My Busy Book . "Her eyes get really, really big," Judd says. "She gets excited and will start hitting on (the book). When I start reading out the numbers...

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The Texas Church Shooter Should Have Been Legally Barred From Owning Guns

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET The Air Force says a mistake allowed Devin Patrick Kelley to buy guns. On Sunday Kelley opened fire on a small chuch in Sutherland Springs, Texas. The former airman had an assault-style rifle and two handguns — all purchased by him, according to federal officials — when he shot and killed 26 people. He also had a known record of domestic violence. In 2012, while he was in the U.S. Air Force, he was court-martialed for assaulting his then-wife and stepson. He served a...

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A Quest: Insulin-Releasing Implant For Type-1 Diabetes

Scientists in California think they may have found a way to transplant insulin-producing cells into diabetic patients who lack those cells — and protect the little insulin-producers from immune rejection. Their system, one of several promising approaches under development, hasn't yet been tested in people. But if it works, it could make living with diabetes much less of a burden. For now, patients with Type-1 diabetes have to regularly test their blood sugar levels, and inject themselves with...

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How To Pick A Health Insurance Plan As Obamacare Signups Start

You might not know it, but open enrollment for Obamacare has begun. We’ll look at how to pick best options, under and outside the Affordable Care Act. This show will air Monday at 11 a.m. EST. President Trump says the Affordable Care Act – Obamacare – is “dead” and “gone.”  It’s not.  But you’ve got to be quick this year to sign up.  The president has cut the enrollment period in half.  People have questions.  Questions too about their employer-provided insurance.  And all the talk of “cheapy...

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Sleepless Night Leaves Some Brain Cells As Sluggish As You Feel

When people don't get enough sleep, certain brain cells literally slow down. A study that recorded directly from neurons in the brains of 12 people found that sleep deprivation causes the bursts of electrical activity that brain cells use to communicate to become slower and weaker, a team reports online Monday in Nature Medicine. The finding could help explain why a lack of sleep impairs a range of mental functions, says Dr. Itzhak Fried , an author of the study and a professor of...

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When Election Day Comes And There's Only One Candidate On The Ballot

Helen Webster wanted to be involved in the school district in her small town of Kremmling, Colo. "I just felt bad that they weren't going to have anyone run up here," she says. So the retired teacher decided to run for a seat on the West Grand County school board. A current board member invited her to a meeting so she could get a sense of the workload. As she sat through all the presentations detailing next year's budget needs, it dawned on her. "I thought 'oh my God, this is more than what I...

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Sen. Rand Paul Recovering From 5 Broken Ribs After Assault

Sen. Rand Paul calls it an "unfortunate event." Police are calling it assault — and many people are trying to figure out why Paul's neighbor, a fellow medical doctor, might allegedly have attacked him with enough force to fracture five ribs. Paul was reportedly tackled while he was mowing the grass at his home in Bowling Green, Ky. Police who were called to Paul's home shortly after 3 p.m. local time on Friday say they arrested Paul's neighbor, 59-year-old Rene Boucher, and charged him with...

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The Russia Investigations: D.C. Braces For More From Mueller; Ripple Effects Widen

Last week in the Russia investigations: Mueller removes all doubt, the imbroglio apparently costs a man a government job and lots of talk — but no silver bullet — on digital interference. Mueller time How many more thunderbolts has Zeus in his quiver? Where might the next one strike? Who does the angry lightning-hurler have in his sights — and who will be spared? Life is different now for denizens of the National Capital Region (aka Washington, D.C., to those who live beyond the Beltway). A...

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Circuit Des Yeux's 'Brainshift' Holds A Disorienting Mirror To Humanity Haley Fohr meditates on existence with telescopic ears and eyes. In the decade since she began Circuit Des Yeux , Fohr has mapped herself onto a world alone, seeking connection through music that rumbles in tandem with her oaken baritone. You can list off the genres that are stitched throughout Circuit Des Yeux — dark folk, post-rock, noise, minimalism, psychedelic and ambient — and still never quite pinpoint the center. This holds especially true...

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Nonprofits Fear House Republican Tax Bill Would Hurt Charitable Giving

House Republicans say the tax bill they introduced Thursday will grow the economy, create jobs and simplify tax returns, in part by eliminating tax deductions. "Over 90 percent of Americans will be able to fill out their taxes on a postcard. That's what simplicity means," House Majority Whip Steve Scalise said. But charities and nonprofit groups say that simplicity comes with a price. Even though Republicans promise to preserve the deduction for charitable donations, these groups say other...

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Firsthand Experience Fuels The 'Pursuit Of Memory'

At one point in Joseph Jebelli's new book In Pursuit of Memory: The Fight Against Alzheimer's , the author interviews Carol Jennings, an elderly woman who lives in Coventry, England. Diagnosed with Alzheimer's, she furrows her brow as she attempts to describe what the onset of the disease felt like — an attempt hampered, of course, by the disease itself. "For a while things were going ... a bit pear-shaped ... there was some sort of thing, I'm sure, that was ... a little bit ... strange," she...

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Sexual Harassment Scandals Abound In Statehouses Across The U.S.

Updated at 8:31 p.m. ET In the weeks since allegations of sexual harassment and assault against movie producer Harvey Weinstein became public , a number of other stories of abuse have come to light: in Hollywood, in newsrooms ( including NPR's ), and now, in statehouses across the country. At a news conference Saturday , Kentucky Gov. Matt Bevin called for the resignation of any lawmakers or government employees who have settled sexual harassment claims. The Republican governor didn't name...

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NPR One: An Award-Winning Cross-Platform Experience

Since launching NPR One in 2014, we've been working to deliver a news and storytelling experience that meets users in all the places they are now and will be in the future. For the Digital Media team, this has meant designing and building focused, yet flexible apps for smartphones, smart TVs, car infotainment systems, wearable devices, voice platforms, and more. That's why we were honored to learn that Google has named NPR One the winner of the 2017 Material Design Award for Platform...

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The Folk Show on WPSU-FM

The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through December, when the Metropolitain Opera Radio Season begins again. And listen to The Folk Show Sundays from 10pm to 12am.

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Reasons To Stay

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WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.