After Heavy Damage, Florida Keys Residents Anxiously Wait To Return Home

Some residents of Key Largo are being allowed back in Tuesday morning, but the Florida Keys are still largely without power, water, medical service and cell service. Most Keys residents are anxiously waiting to hear when they can return home, and others who stayed despite mandatory evacuations remain stranded there. More than 80 percent of customers on the Keys are currently are without power. The Keys received some of the worst of Hurricane Irma's wind and rain as the storm reached the U.S....

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Today’s guest, Jeffry Wert, is a historian and author who specializes in the American Civil War. He's written nine books about the Civil War. His book, Gettysburg--Day Three, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. Wert also taught at Penns Valley Area High School for more than three decades. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked with him about his career as an author and teacher.

Packing for Mars by Mary Roach

Apr 10, 2014
Burks BookMark
Hannah Burks

Centre County Reads is an organization that encourages county residents of all ages to read and discuss the same book. This year’s pick is Mary Roach’s Packing for Mars. Our reviewer, Hannah Burks, is the undergraduate intern for the Center for American Literary Studies at Penn State.

 Bob Zellner’s story starts about as far as you can get from where it ended up. Born in lower Alabama, his father, uncles and grandfather were robe-wearing members of the Ku Klux Klan. In his inspirational memoir, "The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement,” he chronicles his journey to become one of the first white southerners in the early civil rights movement.

I Believe in Cars

Apr 3, 2014
Kate Lao Shaffner

“Mitch, why are you such a knucklehead?” my dad says as he follows me out of our house and into the front yard. “Only a complete idiot would do something this stupid. Sometimes I wonder what goes on in that head of yours…” SLAM! My dad’s voice is suddenly cut off by the reassuring thunk of my car door. I jam the key into the ignition and start the engine. Before my dad even has a chance to finish his sentence, I’m turning out of the driveway, leaving him behind. I lift the clutch and hit the gas; first gear, I can feel the stress starting to melt away as the RPMs increase.

Renowned futurist and New York Times best-selling author Peter Diamandis advises the world’s top CEOs on how to make the most of what he calls exponential technologies. April 1, he’ll be the keynote speaker at Penn State’s Shaping the Future Summit on the Impact of Innovation. WPSU’s Patty Satalia finds out why he’s so optimistic about the future.

Wolf BookMark
Cindy Wolf

Longtime State College resident Cindy Wolf reviews Notes from Inside a Burst Bubble: Penn Staters on the Sandusky Scandal. The collection of essays, blog posts, and news articles is edited by Sheila Squillante and Dave Housley.  

WPSU's Beyond the Classroom examines innovative student learning that isn't bound by university walls. Penn State University is embracing this concept in an initiative it’s calling "Engaged Scholarship." WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports the inaugural Engaged Scholarship Symposium was held at the Nittany Lion Inn yesterday.  

Steven Granich

  WPSU's Beyond the Classroom is our series featuring students engaging in hands-on experiences outside university walls. Today, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner takes us to Lock Haven University, where a group of students are traveling abroad as a class. The university will soon require all students to fulfill a global awareness requirement.

In case you were wondering what Ethiopian Pop music of the 60’s & 70’s would sound like blended with jazz and funk - . wonder no more! WPSU’s Kristine Allen says the answer can be found when Debo Band plays a concert in the Juniata Presents Series at Juniata College in Huntingdon.

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Emily Reddy / WPSU

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Robert Brown interviewed his son Jimmy, who loves history and has won a number of awards for his history presentations.


NPR Stories

One of the coastal cities in Florida inundated with historic flooding after Irma was Jacksonville. The flooding was so severe in some places on Monday that the sheriff’s department said it had to rescue more than 350 people.

Here & Now‘s Robin Young talks to WJCT reporter Ryan Benk (@RyanMichaelBenk), who’s on the scene.

Was Irma, Harvey Coverage Too Much?

44 minutes ago

In the last few weeks, storm coverage of Harvey and Irma has been wall-to-wall and reporters have put themselves in the middle of hurricane-force winds and deadly storm surges. Many are asking, what draws the line between doing a public service and needlessly putting oneself at risk?

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson talks about storm coverage with NPR media correspondent David Folkenflik (@davidfolkenflik).

During Donald Trump's campaign for president, there were times at his rallies when he singled out one reporter for criticism. Katy Tur, who covered the Trump campaign for NBC News and MSNBC, remembers those instances vividly.

In this riveting detective story, Vancouver writer Deborah Campbell goes undercover in Syria in 2007. At first, she is a journalistic sleuth: On a tourist visa in Damascus, her aim is to collect the stories of Iraqis fleeing to Syria as the brutal war in Iraq drives more than a million civilians across the Syrian border, stories that depict the legacy of the U.S. invasion.

It will be four years before Syria begins to come apart — but the signs are there, as past and future conflicts converge.

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Transcript: Hillary Clinton's Full Interview With NPR's Rachel Martin

Ten months after losing the 2016 presidential election, Hillary Clinton is out with a memoir, What Happened. Morning Edition host Rachel Martin talked to Clinton about her book, the election's outcome and how she's carried on. Here's the full transcript of their conversation. The audio on this page is an edited version of the interview that was broadcast on Morning Edition . Rachel Martin: Hillary Clinton joins us now from her home in Chappaqua, New York. Secretary Clinton, thanks so much for...

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Hurricane Irma Blasts Into The Record Books With Lasting Intensity

Hurricane Irma was the longest-lasting powerful hurricane or typhoon ever recorded, worldwide. Irma sustained its 185-mph winds for 37 hours – "the longest any cyclone around the globe has maintained that intensity on record," according to Phil Klotzbach , a research scientist at Colorado State University. The previous record was held by Typhoon Haiyan, also called Super Typhoon Yolanda, which hit the Philippines in 2013. Irma was a hurricane for nearly 12 days. For more than three days of...

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Supreme Court Backs Broad Enforcement Of Travel Ban — For Now

The U.S. Supreme Court will temporarily allow the Trump administration to block many refugees from six mostly Muslim countries without direct familial ties in the United States from entering this country. In a brief order issued Monday, Justice Anthony Kennedy delayed implementation of a ruling issued by the 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals last week that would have allowed entry to refugees with formal ties to resettlement agencies here. Kennedy put that ruling on hold until lawyers opposing...

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Trump's Voting Commission Embroiled In New Controversy Ahead Of Next Meeting

What was already expected to be a contentious second meeting for President Trump's Advisory Commission on Election Integrity, on Tuesday in Manchester, N.H., is likely to get a whole lot more contentious thanks to a column written by the panel's co-chair. Although the chairman, Vice President Pence, said in that first meeting that the commission has "no preconceived notions or pre-ordained results," the panel's co-chair, Kansas Secretary of State Kris Kobach, seemed to contradict him in...

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What To Do When Your Health Insurance Won't Pay The Bills

Understanding your health plan benefits and what isn't covered is crucial for consumers. But that isn't always easy. Readers' questions this month center around what insurance companies need to tell customers about their benefits and when. For example, does my insurer have to give advance notice if it changes my benefits? And does my plan have to issue a written excuse if it denies coverage for services? What if the coverage doesn't meet federal health law standards? Here are some answers. Q:...

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Apparent 'Ethnic Cleansing' Is Now Unfolding In Myanmar, U.N. Says

Updated at 8:05 p.m. ET By the latest estimates , roughly 313,000 refugees have fled Myanmar across the border into Bangladesh in a span of just over two weeks. Hardship awaits the fleeing Rohingya, a Muslim ethnic minority in mostly Buddhist Myanmar: In Bangladesh, they find cramped, makeshift quarters built of bamboo and plastic sheeting , filled with humans and human misery, with few of their possessions. The Rohingya say what they left behind was worse. Reports of unbridled murder and...

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FACT CHECK: Were The 1800s Steve Bannon's Kind Of America?

"You couldn't be more dead wrong. America was built on her citizens. ... Look at the 19th century. What built America's called the American system, from Hamilton to Polk to Henry Clay to Lincoln to the Roosevelts. [It was] a system of protection of our manufacturing, financial system that lends to manufacturers, OK, and the control of our borders. Economic nationalism is what this country was built on. The American system." – Steve Bannon President Trump's former strategic adviser offered...

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On iPhone's 10th Anniversary, Apple Has A Go At A Big Redesign

Back in 2007, the hype around Apple's new phone was all about the keyboard — or lack thereof. "In fact, some experts think the days of the telephone keypad are numbered," NPR's Laura Sydell wrote in advance of the release of the very first iPhone by Steve Jobs. It's fair to say, the forecast triumph of the on-screen keyboard has proved true ( RIP BlackBerry Classic ). This year, the iPhone turns 10. On Tuesday, Apple will unveil the latest iteration — and this time, watchers are raising a...

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Washington, D.C. Students Reflect On 'No Tech Tuesdays' Challenge

This summer, some middle schoolers in Washington, D.C., were offered a challenge : no cellphones, TV or video games for 11 Tuesdays. The schools principal offered $100 to each student who successfully avoided their screens. WAMUs Kate McGee ( @McGeeReports ) caught up with some of the students who tried the challenge. Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit

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Harvey, Irma, DACA And Campus Sexual Assault

It's hard to believe all this could happen in just one week, but here we are with the weekly roundup. Widespread disruption from Harvey and Irma Six of the nation's 10 largest school districts — Puerto Rico , Miami-Dade, Broward County, Houston ISD, Hillsborough County and Orange County — were shuttered this week because of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma. Houston schools are scheduled to reopen on Monday, with three free meals a day for students. Florida school buildings and campuses are being...

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Cassini Spacecraft Prepares For A Fiery Farewell In Saturn's Atmosphere After 13 years in orbit around Saturn, NASA's Cassini spacecraft is about to plunge itself into the planet's atmosphere and disintegrate. NASA decided to put an end to the mission on Friday because the probe is almost out of fuel. Cassini has provided exquisite details about the second-largest planet in our solar system. Take the hurricanes at Saturn's poles, for example. "These hurricanes are large enough they'd cover about half the continental...

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Yes, Some Questions Are Better Than Others

To appreciate that some questions are better than others, it helps to consider a few examples of questions that are bad . To find them, try playing Twenty Questions with a young child. In trying to guess an animal, a young child might ask : Is it a koala? Is it an elephant? (Not: Is it a mammal? Does it live in Africa?) These are bad questions in the sense that they're unlikely to yield an efficient solution to the problem of discovering the animal one's adversary has chosen.
In the...

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From Sept. 11 To The Beatles' British Invasion: How We Remember Our First News Events

If someone asked you where you were and what you were doing on a certain day, would you know? Could you give them exact details and describe how the day progressed? For most people, the answer is probably no, but there are some days that are unforgettable for one reason or another. For those days, it's likely that you remember exactly where you were and what you were doing. For many millennials, Sept. 11, 2001, is the first time they paid attention to the news. They can tell you how old they...

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Here's What 2 Big College Systems Think Of The End Of DACA

This week, President Trump finally made good on his campaign promise to end DACA — Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. This 2012 administrative program implemented by President Obama, has allowed about 800,000 undocumented immigrants who were brought to the U.S. as children to remain in the country. They're known as "DREAMers," after a proposed law that never passed. At least a third of them are, or have been, enrolled in college. So when U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions officially...

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In 'Frankenstein Dreams,' Everything Is Possible — And Also Terrifying

Genevieve Valentine's latest novel is Icon. "I have the soul of an explorer, and in nine of ten cases this leads to destruction." -- Mary E. Wilkins Freeman, "The Hall Bedroom" In 1835, a series of "scientific" articles appeared in the New York Sun describing recent revelations about the moon and its inhabitants — courtesy of developments in telescope technology. Public demand was so high that the Sun reprinted 100,000 copies. And though there was a healthy amount of skepticism, there were...

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Time to Lay It Down: the Soundtrack of the Vietnam War

Saturday, September 16, 12-2pm on WPSU-FM. Hear music that expressed the deep divisions about the war, and provided a life line for GIs in Vietnam, as well as a source of healing when they came home.

Thursday, September 14 at 1:00pm; Sunday, September 17 at 8:00pm: Hear the 2nd documentary in a special series from American Public Media in September.

Get your NPR News Fix This Weekend!

Listen to the latest from NPR News this weekend on Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday mornings, 8:00-10:00am; and All Things Considered, Saturday & Sunday evenings, 5:00-6:00pm on WPSU-FM.

The Folk Show on WPSU-FM

The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through December, when the Metropolitain Opera Radio Season begins again. And listen to The Folk Show Sundays from 10pm to 12am.

Get The New Free WPSU App!

Take public media anywhere you go with the WPSU mobile app available for iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, Android and Amazon devices.

WPSU commemorates the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War.

Tell us about your experiences during that divisive time. Share your memories and commentary, in your own words, photos, video or audio, at the link below.

Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU Podcasts

Subscribe to our podcasts and stay on top of your world with WPSU.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Add your voice!

Write an essay for WPSU's This I Believe or BookMark.

On-Air Schedule

Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.