Steve Bannon Out As Chief White House Strategist

Updated at 1:15 pm ET Steve Bannon has lost his job as chief White House strategist. The White House described the departure as a mutual agreement between Bannon and chief of staff John Kelly. "We are grateful for his service and wish him the best," said press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. Bannon has been a larger-than-life character in Trumpworld: a right-wing provocateur whose rumpled wardrobe and radical politics belied his background at Goldman Sachs and Harvard Business School. ...

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crowd at Bryce Jordan Center
Emily Reddy / WPSU

In State College on Thursday, some 12,000 people turned out for the memorial of long-time Penn State football coach Joe Paterno. Mourners trekked in through the rain to fill Bryce Jordan Center for the memorial.

Paterno statue with crowd
Emily Reddy / WPSU

A steady stream of mourners visited the bronze Joe Paterno statue outside Beaver Stadium yesterday. They went to pay homage to the legendary Penn State football coach.

Most visitors stood and contemplated the statue of Joe Paterno in silence. A few at a time, some walked up to the statue and added candles, flowers, hand-written notes, and Penn State gear to the growing pool of offerings at his feet. By mid-afternoon, someone had draped an American flag over Paterno’s upraised arm. A rosary hung from his other hand. And he wore a blue and white striped Penn State scarf.

Daryl Gregory lives in State College and writes fantasy and science fiction novels.  His new book is a collection of short stories called "Unpossible and Other Stories."

This I Believe: I Believe In Bananagrams

Sep 8, 2011

“Take a letter. Okay, take another. Ha! Take a letter!” We all groan, looking at our Z’s ,K’s and Q’s seriously piling up. We exchange looks with each other that say, “Now how is this fair?” while my mom happily continues to build her ultimate crossword. When the tiles are finally gone, my mom throws her hands in the air and yells “WOOO HOOOO!” That was one of the many times that my mom had beaten our butts at Bananagrams, and the feeling of relief that the round of humiliation was over wasn’t unfamiliar. But then, of course, someone says, “Who's in for another round?

This I Believe: I Believe In Second Impressions

Apr 14, 2011

I was just shy of 17 the first time my brother Daniel introduced me to his girlfriend. Her name was Kristen, and I hated her immediately. But my brother loved her. Granted, I may not have known what love was, but in my teenage years, love meant a brother who would rather be with his girlfriend than with his siblings. Call it what you want *cough* jealously *cough*, but I wasn’t happy.

This I Believe: I Believe Life Should Be "Pun"derful

Mar 24, 2011

One morning, I called the local barbershop to make an appointment. Unfortunately, the barber was all booked up for the day. 

"Well, this is a hairy situation," I said to my girlfriend as I hung up the phone. She replied, "They certainly left you stranded." 

Call me a pundit, a glutton for punishment, or just a "pun"derful guy…I believe in puns. 

You want to spice up any conversation, here's some sage advice. Have a little fun with it. That's why it's called a “play on words” after all. 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating My Convictions

Mar 10, 2011

I believe in eating my convictions. When I was twelve, I stopped eating meat because I liked animals and didn't want to hurt them. My grandmother saw this decision as a personal betrayal. 

Lyndsie Wszola is a Penn State student.

Tim Ziegler next to construction sign on dirt road.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Marcellus shale drilling across Pennsylvania has expanded tremendously in the last couple of years. To extract the natural gas, companies drill straight down about 5,000 feet then shoot highly-pressured water mixed with chemicals and sand vertically through the shale to release the gas. It’s called hydrofracturing, or “fracking.” The whole process requires heavy equipment and millions of gallons of water to be trucked in over roads built to carry passenger cars.

This I Believe: I Believe In Heavy Metal

Mar 11, 2010

I believe heavy metal.
 
When I was 12 years old I saw Metallica’s music video for the song, “One.” The video mixes gritty black and white band footage with excerpts from the film Johnny Got His Gun about a hospitalized soldier who lost his arms, legs, sight, hearing, and speech to a landmine. Over this footage, “One” goes from lament to unstoppable barrage.
 
I believed this song.
 

This I Believe: I Believe In Eating Local

May 25, 2009

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NPR Stories

One of Tesla CEO Elon Musk's companies, the nonprofit start-up OpenAI, manufactures a device that last week was victorious in defeating some of the world's top gamers in an international video game (e-sport) tournament with a multi-million-dollar pot of prize money.

We're getting very good, it seems, at making machines that can outplay us at our favorite pastimes. Machines dominate Go, Jeopardy, Chess and — as of now — at least some video games.

Updated at 1:15 pm ET

Steve Bannon has lost his job as chief White House strategist.

The White House described the departure as a mutual agreement between Bannon and chief of staff John Kelly.

"We are grateful for his service and wish him the best," said press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.

Susan Bro, the mother of Charlottesville victim Heather Heyer, says she will not speak to President Trump because of his comments that suggested white supremacists and people protesting against them were both to blame for last weekend's violence in Virginia.

As the chaos of the past 24 hours settles in Spain, a clearer picture of the human cost in Barcelona and Cambrils is beginning to emerge — and one thing, at least, is becoming more apparent by the hour: Spain's deadliest terror attack in more than a decade claimed lives and damaged others from just about every continent.

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Maryland State House Removes Statue Of Judge Who Wrote Dred Scott Decision

Work crews took down a statue of former Supreme Court Chief Justice Roger Taney overnight in Annapolis, Md., where it had stood since 1872. Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan made a statement on Tuesday calling for the statue to be removed from the State House grounds, NPR's Bill Chappell reported . Hogan called it "the right thing to do," saying, "The time has come to make clear the difference between properly acknowledging our past and glorifying the darkest chapters of our history." Three of the...

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Once Shot For Advocating For Girls' Education, Malala Is Going To Oxford

Malala Yousafzai was only 15 when she was shot by the Taliban in Pakistan for campaigning for the education of girls. Now, she has been accepted to Oxford, one of the world's elite universities. Malala tweeted, "So excited to go to Oxford!!!" She also congratulated other students in England, Wales and Northern Ireland who received news Thursday about their university futures. At Oxford Malala will study philosophy, politics and economics. Gaining a place at an elite university is just the...

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California Prepares For An Eclipse Of Its Solar Power

Spectators around the country are gearing up, eclipse glasses at the ready, for the solar eclipse on Aug. 21. But another group — perhaps more anxious than eager — is preparing as well: the people who run California's electric grid. California is home to almost half of all the solar power in the country. So, even a partial loss of the sun will mean a major dip in the energy supply. "We're doing a lot of coordination, a lot of preparation," says Deane Lyon, a manager at the California...

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'We're Not Them' — Condemning Charlottesville And Condoning White Resentment

As we struggled this week to make sense of what happened in Charlottesville, Va., some big questions bubbled up: What lessons does history teach about white resentment in the United States? How is the experience of other countries and other times — like Germany — relevant? How are those in power reacting to President Trump's shifting response? We reached out to Carol Anderson and Jamelle Bouie for our podcast this week. Anderson is a professor of African-American studies at Emory University...

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High-Achieving, Low-Income Students: Where Elite Colleges Are Falling Short

When Anna Neuman was applying to college, there weren't a lot of people around to help her. Students from her high school in Maryland rarely went on to competitive colleges, the school counselor worked at several schools and was hard to pin down for meetings and neither of her parents had been through the application process before. The only thing her parents told her was that she would have to pay for it herself. "It was really stressful," Neuman recalls. "I was like: 'What is going on?'...

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'Home Fire' Puts A Topical Spin On Ancient Greek Tragedy

Kamila Shamsie's Home Fire opens with a scene that will likely be familiar to any Muslim who lives in, or has traveled to, the West. Isma Pasha waits in a British airport while security officers check her luggage, go through the browser history on her laptop, and demand "to know her thoughts on Shias, homosexuals, the Queen, democracy, The Great British Bake Off , the invasion of Iraq, Israel, suicide bombers, dating websites." Isma is eventually allowed to board a plane headed to...

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From Israel, Quiet Efforts Are Underway To Aid Civilians In Syria

As the war rages in Syria, there have been efforts in Israel, its neighbor to the southwest, to lend a hand to Syrian civilians. The aid projects involve a mix of sympathy, secrecy, strategy — and sensitivity. Israeli volunteers recently gathered in a warehouse to prepare boxes of children's medicine to be sent to Syria — but the Israeli company that runs the warehouse asked not to be identified because it did not want to be publicly associated with the initiative, according to one volunteer....

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Turning To VPNs For Online Privacy? You Might Be Putting Your Data At Risk

Worried about Internet companies snooping on your online browsing? You might turn to something called a virtual private network to protect your privacy. But researchers say these networks can themselves be insecure. Earlier this year, the federal government rolled back rules that would have prevented Internet service providers from tracking your activity online. Comcast, AT&T and other providers are now allowed to track and sell your personal data too — with much less fear of regulatory...

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3 Questions About A Pro-Russia Congressman's Meeting With Julian Assange

A member of Congress who's one of the staunchest defenders of Russia in American politics met with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange in London on Wednesday. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, R-Calif., spent around three hours with Assange talking at the Ecuadorean Embassy there, where Assange sought refuge in 2012 in the face of sexual assault charges in Sweden. In their tête-à-tête, Assange denied that Russia was involved in the hacking or disclosure of emails stolen from the Democratic National...

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With Heavy Drinking On The Rise, How Much Is Too Much?

If one glass of wine takes the edge off, why not drink a few more? This thinking may help explain the findings of a new study that points to an increase in drinking among adults in the U.S., especially women. "We found that both alcohol use and high-risk drinking, which is sometimes called binge-drinking, increased over time," says Deborah Hasin , a professor of epidemiology at the Columbia University Medical Center and an author of the study. To assess drinking trends, researchers conducted...

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CHART: The Relationship Between Seeing Discrimination And Voting For Trump

The recent violence in Charlottesville, Va., amplified an ongoing struggle in America about who experiences discrimination and to what extent. Many of the white nationalists who rallied in Charlottesville, for example, feel that white people are discriminated against as much as, or more than, minority groups. Questioning others' experience of discrimination isn't limited to fringe protest groups. Perceptions of discrimination vary heavily across the U.S. population as a whole, as a June study...

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4 Ways To Get Creative With Summer Corn From Resident Chef Kathy Gunst

Fresh local corn is in season at farmers markets all over the country, and Here & Now  resident chef  Kathy Gunst  has been taking advantage. She brings Here & Now s Robin Young and Meghna Chakrabarti cornbread made with fresh corn, scallops with tomato, corn and basil as well as a corn salad. Sautéed Corn Salad With Tomatoes, Cucumber And Feta With Basil Vinaigrette This salad combines all the best flavors of summer ripe tomatoes, crunchy cucumbers, sweet juicy corn and creamy feta cheese...

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Bears Can Face Summer Challenges In Roadside Zoos

All this summer, bears have been on my mind. Last month, Undark Magazine published an essay I wrote about the time I thought I was a bear. It happened one long night four years ago, immediately following extensive surgery for cancer, a night that preceded months to come of chemotherapy and radiation. Hooked up to a catheter, I felt an unexpected and profound sense of connection with bears I had been reading about for my work: the "bile bears" in Asia so cruelly confined, sometimes for decades...

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GOP Senator: Trump Lacking 'Stability,' 'Competence' To Succeed

Updated at 4:30 p.m. ET A leading Republican senator told reporters on Thursday that President Trump "has not yet been able to demonstrate the stability, nor some of the competence that he needs to demonstrate in order to be successful." Tennessee Sen. Bob Corker was at the Rotary Club of Chattanooga and spoke to local reporters there. In video posted by Chloe Morrison of Nooga.com, Corker added, "And we need for him to be successful. Our nation needs for him to be successful." Referring to...

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Do Laptops Help Learning? A Look At The Only Statewide School Laptop Program

It was the year 2000 and Maine's governor at the time, Angus King, was excited about the Internet. The World Wide Web was still relatively young but King wanted every student in the state to have access to it. "Go into history class and the teacher says, 'Open your computer. We're going to go to rome.com and we're going to watch an archaeologist explore the Catacombs this morning in real time.' What a learning tool that is!" Fast-forward a couple of years and that dream became a reality....

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After 60 Years, Girl's Experience At Whites-Only Gas Station Still Hurts

Editor's Note: This story contains a quote where a racial slur is used. Francine Anderson grew up in a small town in Virginia in the 1950s. As a young black girl, she knew all too well about racism in the Jim Crow South — but it wasn't until one night, driving back home from her grandmother's house, that she truly understood the danger she faced because of the color of her skin. "There's a road that was long and dark, and my father did what no black man at the time was supposed to do —...

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Waste Of Thyme: Why Do We Have To Buy More Herbs Than Recipes Call For?

When was the last time you used the entire container of fresh herbs you bought at the store? Never? Me, too. Every time a recipe calls for 1-2 tablespoons of freshly chopped sprigs, I head to a supermarket and reach for a plastic container holding at least three times as much as I need. A few days later, I'm standing by the trash can observing a moment of silence before I discard a plastic coffin of wasted, withered basil. I know I'm not alone; my friends have sent me all-caps text messages...

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Make Your Own Eclipse Viewer

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATz09bOeNP0 Hundreds of years before solar viewing glasses were readily available, scientists and casual spectators could still enjoy these rare celestial events without frying their eyeballs. They'd use a combination of pinholes and mirrors to redirect the sun's rays onto a screen. It took a while to figure out how to build the so-called camera obscura. Ancient Chinese and Greek scholars puzzled over pinholes for centuries before an Arab mathematician and...

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Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

From the thirteenth floor of a glass tower at the Oregon Health & Science University, you get a panoramic view of downtown Portland and the majestic mountains in the distance. But it's what's happening inside the building that's brought me here. "Should we go do this thing?" lab manager Amy Koski asks. She's just gotten a call from the fertility clinic three floors down. A woman undergoing in vitro fertilization has had her eggs extracted. One of the eggs is too immature to be used to try to...

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The Folk Show on WPSU-FM

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Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.