Sen. John McCain Diagnosed With Brain Cancer, Hospital Says

Arizona Sen. John McCain has been diagnosed with brain cancer, the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix says. McCain, 80, underwent surgery for a blood clot on July 14. The hospital says testing revealed that a tumor "known as a glioblastoma was associated with the blood clot." "The Senator and his family are reviewing further treatment options with his Mayo Clinic care team. Treatment options may include a combination of chemotherapy and radiation," the hospital statement said. A statement from...

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The ex-Army intelligence analyst responsible for the biggest leak of classified material in U.S. history is now officially known as Chelsea Elizabeth Manning.

From his home base in Shanghai, Frank Langfitt keeps track of a wide swath of North and East Asia. He's recently back from Myanmar, where he went for (mostly) fun.

Seven years after a violent split, the two main Palestinian factions said Wednesday that they are attempting to reconcile and form a national unity government within five weeks.

The Palestine Liberation Organization and Hamas have tried several times to resolve their feud, but those efforts quickly unraveled.

So will this attempt fare any better?

Forget wearables, let's talk about inflatables.

Volvo's new child safety seat concept is a fully inflatable device designed to make what's normally a clunky and heavy seat both lighter and more portable.

So compact is this prototype that it goes from a stylish-looking backpack into a rear-facing car seat in less than a minute. You can pump it in the car — the seat comes with its own pump — and it's Bluetooth-connected so you could pump it remotely.

When inflated, the seat weighs just under 11 pounds.

President Obama, at the start of a four-stop trip to Asia, sought to reassure Japan that the U.S. is on its side in a dispute with China over the tiny Senkaku islands chain, which has led to bluster and naval jockeying between the two countries in recent years.

Growing up in West Virginia in the 1960s and '70s, Susan Brown would have a slice of salt rising bread, toasted, for Saturday morning breakfast. Her grandmother baked the bread with the mysterious and misleading name.

There's little or no salt in the recipe. No yeast, either. The bread rises because of bacteria in the potatoes or cornmeal and the flour that goes into the starter.

The taste is as distinctive as the recipe. Salt rising bread is dense and white, with a fine crumb and cheese-like flavor.

Thousands of nonviolent drug offenders serving time in federal prison could be eligible to apply for early release under new clemency guidelines announced Wednesday by the Justice Department.

Details of the initiative, which would give President Obama more options under which he could grant clemency to drug offenders serving long prison sentences, were announced by Deputy Attorney General James Cole.

An American journalist operating in eastern Ukraine has been kidnapped by pro-Russian gunmen, the separatists said Wednesday.

Simon Ostrovsky, working for Vice News, was seized at gunpoint early Tuesday by masked men in the restive eastern Ukrainian city of Slovyansk.

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we'd like to go back to a story that we've turned to a number of times on this program. We're talking about the move in many countries in Africa to toughen legal penalties and increase the stigma against homosexuality.

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The Republican National Committee is joining a slew of deep-pocketed conservative PACs in taking aim at GOP lawmakers who say they will vote no on repealing Obamacare.

With no significant legislative successes in the months since the elections, Republicans are anxious to show that with control of the White House and majorities in both houses of Congress, they can get on with their agenda — a key component of which has long been rolling back President Obama's signature health care law.

Note: This episode originally ran in 2014. Another version was also part of This American Life's Episode 543: Wake Up Now.

Arizona Sen. John McCain has been diagnosed with brain cancer, the Mayo Clinic Hospital in Phoenix says. McCain, 80, underwent surgery for a blood clot on July 14.

The hospital says testing revealed that a tumor "known as a glioblastoma was associated with the blood clot."

"The Senator and his family are reviewing further treatment options with his Mayo Clinic care team. Treatment options may include a combination of chemotherapy and radiation," the hospital statement said.

President Trump says if he had known ahead of time that Attorney General Jeff Sessions was going to recuse himself from the Russia investigation, he would have chosen someone else for the post, calling the move "very unfair."

In an interview with The New York Times, he also accused James Comey, the FBI director that he fired in May, of trying to save his job by leveraging a dossier of compromising material on Trump.

Faces of NPR: Laura Roman

1 hour ago

Faces Of NPR is a weekly feature that showcases the people behind NPR, from the voices you hear every day on the radio to the ones who work outside of the recording studio. You'll find out about what they do and what they're inspired by on the daily. This week's post features NPR's Social Media Strategist, Laura Roman.

The Basics:

Name: Laura Roman

Twitter Handle: @LauraRom95

Job Title: Social Media Strategist at Morning Edition

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Here's What's In The House Republican Budget (And Why It Matters)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tRu8JD3de6Y The House budget plan would slash spending by $5.4 trillion over 10 years, including more than $4 trillion in cuts to mandatory spending like Medicaid and Medicare, while ramping up defense spending. It's true that budgets are often called "political documents" — which is to say that they are more statements of priority than exact plans of how every dollar should be spent. But this 2018 fiscal year budget , released Tuesday, could also allow...

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White House: Trump, Putin Held Second 'Brief Conversation' At G-20

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET In addition to a formal meeting between President Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Group of 20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, earlier this month, the two leaders held a separate, private conversation that has not been previously disclosed, a White House official confirmed on Tuesday. On July 7, the two leaders held a formal two-hour meeting in which Trump later said that his Russian counterpart had denied any interference in the 2016 election. However,...

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Viewing The Great American Eclipse

On Aug. 21, a narrow, 70-mile wide swath of the United States from Oregon to South Carolina will be the stage for one of the most (if not the most) spectacular celestial events, a total eclipse of the sun. Space.com has put together a nice informational guide , including a video and a map explaining where to go, what to expect, and how to watch it safely. This is the first total solar eclipse in America in almost 40 years. The next one in the U.S. will be on April 8, 2024. If you've never...

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Trump's Big Repealing Deal: 8 Takeaways On The Senate's Health Care Meltdown Moment

President Trump has summoned all Senate Republicans to the White House on Wednesday for a debrief on the state of health care legislation effort in their chamber. Based on the week so far, the meeting may be more like a post mortem . The Senate still reportedly plans a vote next week on repealing the Affordable Care Act without a replacement plan. But it appears the GOP leadership will not have the votes it needs to bring even that fallback version of their legislation to the floor. So what...

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Want To Slow Global Warming? Researchers Look To Family Planning

We've all heard of ways to reduce our carbon footprint: biking to work, eating less meat, recycling. But there's another way to help the climate. A recent study from Lund University in Sweden shows that the biggest way to reduce climate change is to have fewer children. "I knew this was a sensitive topic to bring up," says study co-author Kimberly Nicholas on NPR's Morning Edition . "Certainly it's not my place as a scientist to dictate choices for other people. But I do think it is my place...

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Trump Picks Jon Huntsman To Be U.S. Ambassador To Russia

The White House announced Tuesday night that President Trump intends to nominate former Gov. Jon Huntsman of Utah to be U.S. ambassador to Russia. If confirmed, Huntsman would take over a high-profile post amid ongoing probes into Russian meddling in the presidential election and potential ties between Russian officials and the Trump campaign. The White House made the announcement after it confirmed that Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin held a separate, private conversation at the...

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Social Interaction Improves Quality Of Life For People With Dementia

In nursing homes and residential facilities around the world, health care workers are increasingly asking dementia patients questions: What are your interests? How do you want to address us? What should we do to celebrate the life of a friend who has passed away? The questions are part of an approach to care aimed at giving people with memory loss and other cognitive problems a greater sense of control and independence. At its core is the idea that an individual with dementia should be...

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U.K. Bans Credit Card Surcharges, Calling Them A 'Rip-Off'

British retailers will be forbidden from forcing customers to pay surcharges when they use a credit card, under new rules announced by the U.K.'s Treasury Ministry on Wednesday. "Rip-off charges have no place in a modern Britain," said Economic Secretary to the Treasury Stephen Barclay. British consumers sometimes face steep surcharges for using a credit card — as much as 20 percent for purchases such as airfare, the Treasury says. The new rule, which takes effect in January, will also apply...

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Amid Skepticism And Scrutiny, Election Integrity Commission Holds First Meeting

President Trump's Advisory Commission on Election Integrity holds its first public meeting on Wednesday under what seems to be an ever-expanding cloud. The panel has faced credibility problems right from the start, and the concerns have only grown: The commission was proposed by Trump earlier this year to investigate his belief that as many as 5 million people voted illegally last November — an allegation dismissed as unfounded by the vast majority of the nation's election officials and...

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Musk's Warning Sparks Call For Regulating Artificial Intelligence

Elon Musk is warning that artificial intelligence is a " fundamental existential risk for human civilization," and Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper is looking into how states can respond. Musk, the Tesla and SpaceX CEO, made the remarks over the weekend at the National Governors Association meeting in Rhode Island. He has long warned of the threats he believes artificial intelligence will pose, from automation to apocalypse . Bill Gates, Stephen Hawking and others have also sounded warnings...

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We All Live In The Dark, But Some Of Us Live In 'The Dark Dark'

Every year, I find myself looking out for new books that use genre fiction's tools to dissect the unique strangeness of women's lives. Some emerge from the science fiction and fantasy scene; others from the literary world. Enter Samantha Hunt's newest book, The Dark Dark , part of the same FSG Originals imprint that continues to bring us Jeff Vandermeer's crossover novels . Like the best short story collections, The Dark Dark chews on some delicious, evergreen themes in extraordinary ways....

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McConnell Backup Plan To Repeal Affordable Care Act Falters

Updated at 2:40 p.m. ET Hours after a replacement for the Affordable Care Act was all but scuttled by a clutch of Senate Republicans, three lawmakers appear to have doomed Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's Plan B: Repeal the Affordable Care Act without replacing it. Sens. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and Susan Collins of Maine have all said they would vote "no" on a motion that would have kicked off McConnell's plan to vote on a straight repeal of...

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Peter Frampton Rescued A Bird, And Now There's A Song About It

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XPb3Y1YnvGM If you were around when Peter Frampton released his 1976 album Frampton Comes Alive! — a live record which sold more than eight million copies in the U.S. alone — then congratulations! You've lived long enough to hear the rock star sing a sweetly moving, mostly acoustic song about the time he rescued an ailing bird. Frampton's most recent recordings have recast the singer-guitarist as a gentler acoustic chronicler of life, but his softly accented...

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'White House Arrest?' Legal Experts Disagree About Prosecuting A President

The debate over whether the president of the United States can be charged with a crime is as old as the country itself. Early evidence comes from the diary of a Pennsylvania senator, who recorded "a heated debate on this very issue" in September 1789, said Hofstra University Law School professor Eric Freedman. "For those who believe in original intent, we have pretty good evidence of original intent," Freedman said. "The founders just disagreed on the very question." The words of the...

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Private Student Loans: The Rise And Fall (And Rise Again?)

Five billion dollars in outstanding private student loan debt may be forgiven because of poor record keeping by financial companies, an investigation by The New York Times found this week . Loan balances are being erased and lawsuits thrown out because the loans were bundled and resold, like the subprime mortgages that precipitated the Great Recession, and the loans' current owners are struggling to prove in court that they're collecting the right amounts from the right borrowers. Private...

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To Defend Western Civilization, Start With Science

Just before joining other leaders at the G-20 summit, President Donald Trump gave a speech in Poland where he asked: "Does the West have the will to survive?" Since then, a lot of ink (and electrons) has been spilled asking about the value, and values, of Western Civilization. Far be it for me to pass judgment on entire civilizations — but as a whole I'm all in with the best parts of Western Civilization. That's because one of the "best parts" of this thing that happened in the West was this...

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It Is A Truth Universally Acknowledged That Jane Austen Pairs Well With Tea

In an essay on Jane Austen, Virginia Woolf observed , "Of all great writers she is the most difficult to catch in the act of greatness." To that double-edged and astute assessment, one can add, she is also the most difficult to catch in the act of tea-time. This observation might seem irksomely contrarian to the legions of Janeites in hats and bonnets gathered around tea and scones to pay fealty to the novelist on the bicentenary of her death, which falls today. 'Jane Austen and tea' is after...

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WATCH: 'The Wild West?' No, It's New Hampshire — But Those Really Are Bison

Updated at 12:40 p.m. ET New Hampshire police had to contend with some unlikely fugitives on the lam on Tuesday: a small herd of bison. As many as 16 of the massive animals fled a farm owned by Armand Bolduc, busting through a fence in the morning. For several hours, the bison were "scared and running" through front lawns, forests and busy roadways, according to the Gilford Police Department. But by evening, police and animal control officials had wrangled the bison and brought them safely...

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