White Supremacist Charged With Terrorism Over Murder Of Black Man

Authorities in New York have charged a white supremacist from Baltimore with terrorism over the murder of a black man last week. Police say 28-year-old James Jackson of Baltimore traveled to New York City specifically to kill black men. It was a plan he carried out on Monday, stabbing 66-year-old Timothy Caughman to death on a public street corner, police say. The Associated Press reports that Caughman was remembered "as a gentleman and a good neighbor." Caughman "was alone and collecting...

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Today’s guest, Jeffry Wert, is a historian and author who specializes in the American Civil War. He's written nine books about the Civil War. His book, Gettysburg--Day Three, was nominated for a Pulitzer Prize and National Book Award. Wert also taught at Penns Valley Area High School for more than three decades. WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner talked with him about his career as an author and teacher.

Packing for Mars by Mary Roach

Apr 10, 2014
Burks BookMark
Hannah Burks

Centre County Reads is an organization that encourages county residents of all ages to read and discuss the same book. This year’s pick is Mary Roach’s Packing for Mars. Our reviewer, Hannah Burks, is the undergraduate intern for the Center for American Literary Studies at Penn State.

 Bob Zellner’s story starts about as far as you can get from where it ended up. Born in lower Alabama, his father, uncles and grandfather were robe-wearing members of the Ku Klux Klan. In his inspirational memoir, "The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement,” he chronicles his journey to become one of the first white southerners in the early civil rights movement.

I Believe in Cars

Apr 3, 2014
Hoffman
Kate Lao Shaffner

“Mitch, why are you such a knucklehead?” my dad says as he follows me out of our house and into the front yard. “Only a complete idiot would do something this stupid. Sometimes I wonder what goes on in that head of yours…” SLAM! My dad’s voice is suddenly cut off by the reassuring thunk of my car door. I jam the key into the ignition and start the engine. Before my dad even has a chance to finish his sentence, I’m turning out of the driveway, leaving him behind. I lift the clutch and hit the gas; first gear, I can feel the stress starting to melt away as the RPMs increase.

Renowned futurist and New York Times best-selling author Peter Diamandis advises the world’s top CEOs on how to make the most of what he calls exponential technologies. April 1, he’ll be the keynote speaker at Penn State’s Shaping the Future Summit on the Impact of Innovation. WPSU’s Patty Satalia finds out why he’s so optimistic about the future.

Wolf BookMark
Cindy Wolf

Longtime State College resident Cindy Wolf reviews Notes from Inside a Burst Bubble: Penn Staters on the Sandusky Scandal. The collection of essays, blog posts, and news articles is edited by Sheila Squillante and Dave Housley.  

WPSU's Beyond the Classroom examines innovative student learning that isn't bound by university walls. Penn State University is embracing this concept in an initiative it’s calling "Engaged Scholarship." WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner reports the inaugural Engaged Scholarship Symposium was held at the Nittany Lion Inn yesterday.  

Pyramid
Steven Granich

  WPSU's Beyond the Classroom is our series featuring students engaging in hands-on experiences outside university walls. Today, WPSU's Kate Lao Shaffner takes us to Lock Haven University, where a group of students are traveling abroad as a class. The university will soon require all students to fulfill a global awareness requirement.

In case you were wondering what Ethiopian Pop music of the 60’s & 70’s would sound like blended with jazz and funk - . wonder no more! WPSU’s Kristine Allen says the answer can be found when Debo Band plays a concert in the Juniata Presents Series at Juniata College in Huntingdon.

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StoryCorps
Emily Reddy / WPSU

WPSU is traveling to towns across central and northern Pennsylvania to collect oral history recordings. In October, we stopped at the Old Gregg School in the Penns Valley town of Spring Mills. Robert Brown interviewed his son Jimmy, who loves history and has won a number of awards for his history presentations.

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NPR Stories

USA Hockey says it has a pay deal with players on the women's team, averting a threatened boycott of the world championships, which start Friday near Detroit.

Before the agreement team captain Meghan Duggan told NPR's All Things Considered that she and her teammates were paid poorly:

If you're looking for work, you might start with one of those websites that posts jobs. But if you're an older adult looking for work, you might have found yourself excluded from some of the features on those sites.

Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan opened an investigation after a 70-year-old man called her office and complained that he'd been unable to use a resume building tool on JOBR, an app owned by Monster Worldwide.

Wilson "Bill" Minor, an investigative reporter and syndicated columnist who documented Mississippi politics for almost seven decades, has died at 94, The Associated Press reports.

Minor was an institution, inspiring awe from fellow reporters for the depth of his knowledge — and the astonishing length of his career.

A paralyzed man has regained the use of his arm and hand using a system that decodes his thoughts and controls his muscles.

President Trump is expected to sign into law a decision by Congress to overturn new privacy rules for Internet service providers.

Passed by the Federal Communications Commission in October, the rules never went into effect. If they had, it would have given consumers more control over how ISPs use the data they collect. Most notably, the rules would have required explicit consent from consumers if sensitive data — like financial or health information, or browsing history — were to be shared or sold.

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Senator: Treasury Secretary's Plug For 'Lego Batman' May Be Ethical Violation

The ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee is asking a government watchdog to investigate recent remarks by Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin as a possible ethical violation. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., says in a statement Mnuchin's plug for a movie he helped produce signals "a blatant disregard and disrespect to the office he serves and the power it holds." A Treasury spokesman said Mnuchin mentioned the movie during a "light-hearted moment," when directly asked for movie...

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Message To 'Resistors' From Occupy Co-Creator: Stop Protesting. Run For Office

Opponents of President Trump say resistance to his policies is robust, motivated — and here to stay. They point to big demonstrations including January's Women's March and the upcoming Earth Day "March for Science." Occupy Wall Street co-creator Micah White says bravo, but there's just one problem: Big street protests don't work. They're ineffectual, even counterproductive, he says. "We could have large-scale marches for every year of Trump's presidency. It would do nothing!" the activist and...

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Pinkies Up! A Local Tea Movement Is Brewing

On Saturday mornings, the most popular item Minto Island Growers sells at its farmers market booth is not the certified organic carrots, kale or blueberries. It's tea. The farm grows Camellia sinensis , tea plants, on a half-acre plot in Salem, Ore. The tender leaves are hand picked and hand processed to make 100 pounds of organic, small batch tea. The interest is so strong — the loose-leaf black, green and oolong teas sell out within weeks of spring production — that Elizabeth Miller and her...

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Scottish Parliament Backs Bid For New Independence Vote

One day before the U.K. is widely expected to formally begin its departure from the European Union, Scottish lawmakers took another crucial step toward voting on a departure of their own. By a 69-59 vote Tuesday, members of Scottish Parliament backed First Minister Nicola Sturgeon's pursuit of a new independence referendum. The motion grants Sturgeon the authority to negotiate with the U.K. government in London on behalf of Edinburgh, placing Scotland one step closer to granting its voters...

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Attorney General Orders Crackdown On 'Sanctuary Cities,' Threatens Holding Funds

The Justice Department is following through on an executive order to withhold as much as $4.1 billion in federal grants from so-called "sanctuary cities," generally defined as places where local law enforcement limit their cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement. Attorney General Jeff Sessions' appearance at the daily White House briefing is a signal that President Trump wants to move on to one of the issues he's most comfortable talking about — illegal immigration —...

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Watch Pokey LaFarge Perform 'Hard Times Come And Go' Live On Mountain Stage

Don't call it a throwback; call it "American music that never died." With a mix of ragtime, jazz, country blues and Western swing, St. Louis multi-instrumentalist Pokey LaFarge breathes new life (and charm) into traditional roots music. In his third appearance on Mountain Stage , recorded live in Charleston, W.Va., LaFarge leads his six-piece band in a rip-roaring performance of "Hard Times Come And Go." SET LIST "Hard Times Come And Go" Photo: Brian Blauser/ Mountain Stage
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Elon Musk Seen Targeting Human-Computer Link In New Venture

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsixsRI-Sz4 In the past, entrepreneur Elon Musk has described a "neural lace" that could add a symbiotic digital layer to the human brain. In the future, it seems, he'll try to build that device through a new company, Neuralink. Musk, whose name is also tied to ambitious projects in space and electric cars, confirmed the new venture early Tuesday, after it was first reported by The Wall Street Journal . "He hasn't made an announcement, but Neuralink registered...

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Trump Takes Aim At A Centerpiece Of Obama's Environmental Legacy

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies. The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change. It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change. In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency. Standing next to...

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Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

It's clear from the numbers. Google has a diversity problem. For the past few years, the company has publicly shared its workplace makeup in a report detailing the race, gender and ethnicity of each employee hired the previous year. Last year, while the number of black employees went up, they still represented only 2 percent of the company's workforce and Google admitted it fell short of its diversity goal. In one small step to grow those numbers, this summer 25 students from Howard...

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Everybody Lies, And That's Not Always A Bad Thing

When we think about dishonesty, we mostly think about the big stuff. We see big scandals, big lies, and we think to ourselves, I could never do that . We think we're fundamentally different from Bernie Madoff or Tiger Woods. But behind big lies are a series of small deceptions. Dan Ariely, a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University, writes about this in his book The Honest Truth about Dishonesty . "One of the frightening conclusions we have is that what separates...

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Hamtramck, Michigan: An Evolving City Of Immigrants

Pick a street corner in downtown Hamtramck, Mich., and you'll be struck by the incredible mix of cultures crammed into this tiny, 2-square-mile city. A Catholic church across the street from a mosque. Polish pastry shops, sausage factories, and grocery stores promising "the best Polish food, shipping to Eastern Europe," side by side with Bengali clothing shops that sell richly embroidered dresses and headscarves. And you'd be remiss if you didn't stop in the many Yemeni restaurants serving...

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'The Tinder Opera' Creators Hope You Swipe Right On Online Opera

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imvYwZjJX0Q The first opera hit the stage over 400 years ago. More recently, the art form has been adapted to modern media: In the 1920s and '30s, operas were written to be performed on the radio, and in 1951, NBC commissioned Gian Carlo Menotti to compose Amahl And The Night Visitors for television. Now, a company called Rainy Park Opera is creating operas for the internet. The project started over a beer. On one stool: Adam Taylor, a young filmmaker based in...

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What Gave Some Primates Bigger Brains? A Fruit-Filled Diet

Primate brains may have grown larger and more complex thanks to a fruit-filled diet, a new study suggests. The researchers analyzed the brain sizes and diets of over 140 primate species spanning apes, monkeys, lemurs and lorises and found that those who munched on fruit instead of leaves had 25 percent more brain tissue, even when controlling for body size and species relatedness. Take spider monkeys and howler monkeys, for example. They both live in the rain forests of South America in...

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Mind, Matter And Materialism

Science and philosophy have a long, complicated history. Both are human endeavors aimed at articulating the nature of the world. But where the line between them lies depends a lot on perspective and history. Questions that once lay firmly in philosophy's domain have now fully entered the realm of science. Other issues which might seem fully covered by science retain open philosophical questions that either haunt or inform ongoing research (depending on one's viewpoint). One of the persistent...

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Happening Now: A Cake & Icing Challenge To Support WPSU

WPSU-FM's fund drive begins Saturday. But if you donate early and help us reach $10,000, current members of WPSU will ice that cake with another $3,500! So your donation goes farther today. Thanks!

Mike McGrath Visits Central PA

Mike McGrath, host of public radio's You Bet Your Garden, will visit Central PA April 6-8 to host special events for WPSU! For details & tickets, click below.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

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Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

WPSU's series "Reasons to Stay" explores what keeps people in central Pa. On the radio during Morning Edition, and on our multi-media website.

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.