White Supremacist Charged With Terrorism Over Murder Of Black Man

Authorities in New York have charged a white supremacist from Baltimore with terrorism over the murder of a black man last week. Police say 28-year-old James Jackson of Baltimore traveled to New York City specifically to kill black men. It was a plan he carried out on Monday, stabbing 66-year-old Timothy Caughman to death on a public street corner, police say. The Associated Press reports that Caughman was remembered "as a gentleman and a good neighbor." Caughman "was alone and collecting...

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This week, former Penn State University president Graham Spanier is in court for his role in the Jerry Sandusky child sex abuse scandal. This trial is one of the final chapters in a legal saga that has stretched since Sandusky was arrested in 2011. 

But outside the courtroom, the effects of Sandusky's actions are still being felt statewide.

Tim Curley
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) – The primary witnesses for the prosecution are testifying Wednesday in the child endangerment trial of former Penn State President Graham Spanier.

Spanier’s charged with failing to act aggressively enough to prevent football coach Jerry Sandusky from serially abusing young boys.

One of those witnesses—former Penn State Athletic Director Tim Curley—handled the case alongside Spanier, and has already said he wishes he did more.

Joe Crookston: Songwriter, guitarist, painter, fiddler, slide player, eco-village member and 2016 Folk Alliance International Artist-in-Residence.  Joe has  he's evolved from a killer songwriter who accompanies himself on guitar, to an accomplished multi-instrumentalists who doesn't shy away from electronics when they further the minstrel tradition.   Over ten years ago he opened a concert at the Center; on November 19, 2016,  the larger stage at the WPSU studio was his,  and we are happy to share that experience with you in this recording, made that night. 

Graham Spanier walking up courthouse stairs, surrounded by TV cameras
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) – Both the prosecution and defense have begun laying out their arguments in day two of the trial of Graham Spanier—the former Penn State president whose tenure included the years assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky serially abused young children.

The case being set up revolves around whether Spanier’s decision not to inform child protective services of Sandusky’s abuse was criminal—or just a bad judgment call.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch surrounded by photographers.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais / AP Photo

The NPR Politics team will live blog the Senate Judiciary Committee's hearings on the nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch to the U.S. Supreme Court. The live blog will include streaming video, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier surrounded by reporters
Matt Rourke / AP Photo

(Harrisburg) -- There’s just one criminal trial left in court related to the child sex abuse case that has surrounded former Penn State assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky since 2011.

It's the trial of former Penn State President Graham Spanier, who is charged with handling the abuse improperly. 

When allegations that Sandusky was abusing young boys surfaced in 2001, Spanier and others didn't report it to authorities, opting instead to handle it as an internal matter.

Public Domain

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on March 18, 2017, and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear Chuck Berry, Al King, Bill Morrissey, Bob Dylan & The Band, The Black Keys, John Hammond, Willie Dixon, Junior Kimbrough, Rory Gallagher, Muddy Waters and more.

In the second hour, hear Jimi Hendrix, Buddy Moss, Doc Watson, Valerie June, Mike Seeger, Dave Van Ronk, Led Zeppelin, Maddie May Thomas, The Dixie Hummingbirds, James Cotton, Lonnie Coleman, B.B. King and more.   

FBI Director James Comey, left, and National Security Agency Director Michael Rogers
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

The NPR Two-Way blog will provide live coverage of the House Intelligence Committee’s public hearing on the investigations into alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential election. The live blog will include streaming video of the proceedings, with posts featuring highlights, context and analysis from NPR reporters and correspondents.

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Both Philadelphia and Pittsburgh are in the midst of multi-year building booms. More than 4,000 apartment units were built in the two cities last year.

For many years in Pittsburgh, new apartment buildings weren’t a priority: the city had plenty of available housing stock and, despite a steady flow of college students, fairly pedestrian demand. But in 2012, 958 new units were built. The next year, that number jumped to 3,227 and hasn’t fallen below 2,100 since, according to Jeff Burd, president of Tall Timber Group, an information service for the construction industry.

A spokesperson for Rep. Glenn Thompson says that as it stands now, the Congressman is not fully committed to voting in favor of the new health care bill scheduled for a house vote this week.

Thompson is one of a number of Republicans who has said they can’t support the American Health Care Act, Speaker of the House Paul Ryan’s plan to repeal and replace Obamacare.

Thompson’s major concern is the anticipation of premium increases to older populations above and beyond what they are already facing under the current healthcare law.

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I have always found it difficult to explain my family's syncretic faith traditions to both white Americans and to other South Asians. We are Hindu Sindhis, originating from an area around the Indus River, in what is now modern southeast Pakistan. On our home altar, familiar Hindu idols — Lakshmi, Ganesh, Krishna — share space with images of the 10 Sikh gurus and Jhulelal. Jhulelal, a river deity, is not only the patron saint of Hindu Sindhis, but is also revered by Sufi Muslims.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

President Trump issued a sweeping executive order on Tuesday that will begin to undo a slew of government efforts to fight global warming.

Among those worrying and watching to see how the executive order plays out are scientists who actually are in favor of exploring bold interventions to artificially cool the climate.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Senator: Treasury Secretary's Plug For 'Lego Batman' May Be Ethical Violation

The ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee is asking a government watchdog to investigate recent remarks by Treasury Secretary Stephen Mnuchin as a possible ethical violation. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., says in a statement Mnuchin's plug for a movie he helped produce signals "a blatant disregard and disrespect to the office he serves and the power it holds." A Treasury spokesman said Mnuchin mentioned the movie during a "light-hearted moment," when directly asked for movie...

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Message To 'Resistors' From Occupy Co-Creator: Stop Protesting. Run For Office

Opponents of President Trump say resistance to his policies is robust, motivated — and here to stay. They point to big demonstrations including January's Women's March and the upcoming Earth Day "March for Science." Occupy Wall Street co-creator Micah White says bravo, but there's just one problem: Big street protests don't work. They're ineffectual, even counterproductive, he says. "We could have large-scale marches for every year of Trump's presidency. It would do nothing!" the activist and...

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Pinkies Up! A Local Tea Movement Is Brewing

On Saturday mornings, the most popular item Minto Island Growers sells at its farmers market booth is not the certified organic carrots, kale or blueberries. It's tea. The farm grows Camellia sinensis , tea plants, on a half-acre plot in Salem, Ore. The tender leaves are hand picked and hand processed to make 100 pounds of organic, small batch tea. The interest is so strong — the loose-leaf black, green and oolong teas sell out within weeks of spring production — that Elizabeth Miller and her...

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Scottish Parliament Backs Bid For New Independence Vote

One day before the U.K. is widely expected to formally begin its departure from the European Union, Scottish lawmakers took another crucial step toward voting on a departure of their own. By a 69-59 vote Tuesday, members of Scottish Parliament backed First Minister Nicola Sturgeon's pursuit of a new independence referendum. The motion grants Sturgeon the authority to negotiate with the U.K. government in London on behalf of Edinburgh, placing Scotland one step closer to granting its voters...

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Attorney General Orders Crackdown On 'Sanctuary Cities,' Threatens Holding Funds

The Justice Department is following through on an executive order to withhold as much as $4.1 billion in federal grants from so-called "sanctuary cities," generally defined as places where local law enforcement limit their cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement. Attorney General Jeff Sessions' appearance at the daily White House briefing is a signal that President Trump wants to move on to one of the issues he's most comfortable talking about — illegal immigration —...

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Watch Pokey LaFarge Perform 'Hard Times Come And Go' Live On Mountain Stage

Don't call it a throwback; call it "American music that never died." With a mix of ragtime, jazz, country blues and Western swing, St. Louis multi-instrumentalist Pokey LaFarge breathes new life (and charm) into traditional roots music. In his third appearance on Mountain Stage , recorded live in Charleston, W.Va., LaFarge leads his six-piece band in a rip-roaring performance of "Hard Times Come And Go." SET LIST "Hard Times Come And Go" Photo: Brian Blauser/ Mountain Stage
Watch more...

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Elon Musk Seen Targeting Human-Computer Link In New Venture

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wsixsRI-Sz4 In the past, entrepreneur Elon Musk has described a "neural lace" that could add a symbiotic digital layer to the human brain. In the future, it seems, he'll try to build that device through a new company, Neuralink. Musk, whose name is also tied to ambitious projects in space and electric cars, confirmed the new venture early Tuesday, after it was first reported by The Wall Street Journal . "He hasn't made an announcement, but Neuralink registered...

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Trump Takes Aim At A Centerpiece Of Obama's Environmental Legacy

President Trump signed a sweeping executive order Tuesday that takes aim at a number of his predecessor's climate policies. The wide-ranging order seeks to undo the centerpiece of former President Obama's environmental legacy and national efforts to address climate change. It could also jeopardize America's current role in international efforts to confront climate change. In a symbolic gesture, Trump signed the document at the headquarters of Environmental Protection Agency. Standing next to...

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Google Hopes To Hire More Black Engineers By Bringing Students To Silicon Valley

It's clear from the numbers. Google has a diversity problem. For the past few years, the company has publicly shared its workplace makeup in a report detailing the race, gender and ethnicity of each employee hired the previous year. Last year, while the number of black employees went up, they still represented only 2 percent of the company's workforce and Google admitted it fell short of its diversity goal. In one small step to grow those numbers, this summer 25 students from Howard...

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Everybody Lies, And That's Not Always A Bad Thing

When we think about dishonesty, we mostly think about the big stuff. We see big scandals, big lies, and we think to ourselves, I could never do that . We think we're fundamentally different from Bernie Madoff or Tiger Woods. But behind big lies are a series of small deceptions. Dan Ariely, a professor of psychology and behavioral economics at Duke University, writes about this in his book The Honest Truth about Dishonesty . "One of the frightening conclusions we have is that what separates...

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Hamtramck, Michigan: An Evolving City Of Immigrants

Pick a street corner in downtown Hamtramck, Mich., and you'll be struck by the incredible mix of cultures crammed into this tiny, 2-square-mile city. A Catholic church across the street from a mosque. Polish pastry shops, sausage factories, and grocery stores promising "the best Polish food, shipping to Eastern Europe," side by side with Bengali clothing shops that sell richly embroidered dresses and headscarves. And you'd be remiss if you didn't stop in the many Yemeni restaurants serving...

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'The Tinder Opera' Creators Hope You Swipe Right On Online Opera

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=imvYwZjJX0Q The first opera hit the stage over 400 years ago. More recently, the art form has been adapted to modern media: In the 1920s and '30s, operas were written to be performed on the radio, and in 1951, NBC commissioned Gian Carlo Menotti to compose Amahl And The Night Visitors for television. Now, a company called Rainy Park Opera is creating operas for the internet. The project started over a beer. On one stool: Adam Taylor, a young filmmaker based in...

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What Gave Some Primates Bigger Brains? A Fruit-Filled Diet

Primate brains may have grown larger and more complex thanks to a fruit-filled diet, a new study suggests. The researchers analyzed the brain sizes and diets of over 140 primate species spanning apes, monkeys, lemurs and lorises and found that those who munched on fruit instead of leaves had 25 percent more brain tissue, even when controlling for body size and species relatedness. Take spider monkeys and howler monkeys, for example. They both live in the rain forests of South America in...

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Mind, Matter And Materialism

Science and philosophy have a long, complicated history. Both are human endeavors aimed at articulating the nature of the world. But where the line between them lies depends a lot on perspective and history. Questions that once lay firmly in philosophy's domain have now fully entered the realm of science. Other issues which might seem fully covered by science retain open philosophical questions that either haunt or inform ongoing research (depending on one's viewpoint). One of the persistent...

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Happening Now: A Cake & Icing Challenge To Support WPSU

WPSU-FM's fund drive begins Saturday. But if you donate early and help us reach $10,000, current members of WPSU will ice that cake with another $3,500! So your donation goes farther today. Thanks!

Mike McGrath Visits Central PA

Mike McGrath, host of public radio's You Bet Your Garden, will visit Central PA April 6-8 to host special events for WPSU! For details & tickets, click below.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

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Turn Your Old Car into Public Radio!

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

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Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

WPSU's series "Reasons to Stay" explores what keeps people in central Pa. On the radio during Morning Edition, and on our multi-media website.

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.