the Rathskeller
Anne Danahy / WPSU

With The Skeller Slated To Close, Memories Continue

One of the many pictures decorating the walls at the Rathskeller is a photograph of Timothy Leary, the psychologist who told people to “turn on, tune in and drop out.” Leary went to the Skeller many years ago after debating G. Gordon Liddy, of Watergate fame, at Penn State. Bar owner Duke Gastiger said Leary collected Americana and wanted to buy one of the bar’s tables that was chiseled with customers’ names. Leary didn’t get to leave with a table, but Gastiger said they’d send him one. “We...

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John Fetterman speaking
Min Xian / WPSU

John Fetterman, mayor of Braddock, Pennsylvania and lieutenant governor hopeful, made an appearance at Webster's Bookstore Cafe in State College just hours after he received an endorsement from former governor and Philadelphia mayor Ed Rendell.

"He revitalized the downtown, reduced the crime rate. Braddock hasn't had a homicide in five and a half years - an extraordinary record," Rendell said. "Most of all, he brought hope back to a fine heritage Pennsylvania city in Braddock."

Fetterman said it’s nice to have the recognition.

A staff writer for the New Yorker and a professor of journalism at Columbia University, Jelani Cobb writes about politics, culture and race. He brings both historical insight and an eloquent writing style to topics ranging from football players kneeling during the national anthem to political battles over bathrooms. His writing has won awards and appeared in a number of publications, and he is the author of several books, including “The Substance of Hope: Barack Obama and the Paradox of Progress.” He is also known for his appearances on national television and radio programs.

Richard Cho speaking at summit
Min Xian / WPSU

A nationwide initiative to reduce imprisonment of people with mental illness is hosting a two-day summit in State College on Monday and Tuesday. The Pennsylvania Stepping Up Summit calls for better practices in evaluating and treating mental illness.

Christian Leinbach is chairman of the Berks County Commissioners and has been working on the Stepping Up initiative since before it was launched in 2015. Leinbach said his county jail has about 1,000 people on a daily average. Over half of that population faces mental illness.

Crafton Barnes / ericgalesband.com

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on December 2, 2017, hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first part, hear tracks from The Black Keys, Eric Gales, Jack White, Taj Mahall, David Bromberg, Frank Zappa, Mississippi John Hurt, Willie Dixon, Ry Cooder, Led Zeppelin, and more.

In hour two, hear Johnny Cash, The Sojourners, Sly & The Family Stone, Blind Gary Davis, The Four Blazes, Alabama Shakes, Bob Dylan, Lead Belly, Rory Block, Carolina Chocolate Drops, Sam Cooke, Albert King, and more.

 

WPSU Jazz Archive - December 1, 2017

Dec 2, 2017
Concord Music Group

  

An archive edition of the WPSU Jazz show as broadcast on December 1, 2017 and hosted by Greg Halpin.

The first hour of the program features all new jazz release from The Marcus Roberts Trio,  Edward Simon with Scott Collee and Brian Blade, Harold Danko, Michel Camilo, and more.

In the second hour, it’s jazz classics from the 50’s and 60’s and some holiday jazz including tracks from Billy Martin’s Wicked Knee, Kenny Durham, Ritchie Cole, John Coltrane, The Vince Guaraldi Trio, Brad Mehldau and more. 

Matt Rourke / AP Photo

In the wake of recent high-profile sexual harassment allegations coming to light, lawmakers in Pennsylvania are proposing to reform how state government handles allegations concerning legislators.

State Rep. Leanne Krueger-Braneky (D-Delaware) plans to  introduce the MeToo Pennsylvania State House Act, which would ban non-disclosure agreements and prohibit use of taxpayer money for settling claims in sexual harassment or assault cases that involve lawmakers.

 

“Shame, Shame, I Know Your Name” is the second thriller in the Marina Konyeshna series by Heather Harlen. Human trafficking remains the driving force behind the plot in this book as well. Its fast-paced dialogue and action kept me turning the pages. Marina’s irrepressible personality makes her a highly likable protagonist. Her fresh inner dialogue, utilizing her innate wit and intelligence, provides readers with suspense, danger and drama in Moscow’s soup kitchens to its night clubs.

protest
Anne Danahy / WPSU

Penn State faculty, grad students and supporters rallied at the Allen Street gates in State College Wednesday. They were protesting a tax hike for graduate students included in the GOP House tax plan. 

One member of the group, Margarita Hernandez, is in her first year working toward a PhD in anthropology.

“We already get paid enough to live or so. But, that extra tax is going to make that so it’s not feasible anymore,” Hernandez said.

Adriana Rizzo, a first year PhD student in geosciences, said the change would be an economic hardship for a lot of students.

A house in the Holmes-Foster Historic District, which will be under the proposed HARB.
Sarah Paez / WPSU

  

A Historical and Architectural Review Board, or HARB, could be coming to State College soon.

At a series of HARB community workshops and public meetings hosted by the borough of State College, homeowners and residents voiced their opinions about having a board come to the borough.

The State College HARB would be an advisory board to protect the architectural heritage of the historic districts of College Heights, Holmes-Foster and Highlands. The HARB would recommend to the borough council whether to approve or deny property alterations.

U.S. Capitol
AP

On Nov. 16, the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Republican tax plan. It would make changes including counting graduate scholarships and tuition discounts as taxable income. That has raised concerns for some, including the administration at Penn State.

Sheila West, a professor of biobehavioral health and nutrition at Penn State, is also the parent of a college student. Her son is in his first year at Penn State. He wants to become an architect.

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NPR Stories

Thousands of firefighters who have traveled from across the country to Southern California have started making progress containing the fifth-largest wildfire in the state's history.

The week-old, nearly 23,000-acre Thomas Fire is now 20 percent contained, after firefighters on the ground and in aircraft took advantage of weakened Santa Ana winds on Monday night. The fire has consumed an area larger than the size of New York City.

The latest viral video to capture young Africans' social media pages has a striking lack of epic fails or baby animals. It's literally just Ghana's president Nana Akufo-Addo in a joint press conference in Accra with French president Emmanuel Macron, who was making the last stop of his first Africa tour on November 30.

Last week, another human foot washed ashore near Sooke, Canada, on Vancouver Island — the 13th foot found in British Columbia in the last decade.

Human feet have also had a tendency to wash ashore in Washington State.

The most recent foot (with a tibia and fibula attached) was encountered by a man walking his dogs in the town of Jordan River, the CBC reports.

The long and growing list of high-profile men losing their jobs amid sexual-harassment allegations speaks to a big cultural sea change. But is that shift driven by generational differences in how sexual harassment is viewed, or by bigger changes in the workplace?

Seattle executive consultant Kim Arellano has taught classes on generational differences, and says sexual harassment makes for the liveliest discussions.

It may be hard to imagine a composer being inspired by public hearings and court cases. But Lake Erie and its problems take center stage in a new oratorio from Cleveland composer Margaret Brouwer.

Elizabeth Miller (@llmiller12) of Great Lakes Today has more on the piece and its recent premiere.

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A Timeline Of Plot Twists And Bombshells: How We Got To Election Day In Alabama

Alabamians head to the polls Tuesday to vote for their next U.S. senator. For some, it will be the third time this year they've cast a ballot to determine who will assume the seat recently occupied by current Attorney General Jeff Sessions for two decades. The circuitous path to get to this point has been nothing short of extraordinary. Yes, the race is between Republican Roy Moore and Democrat Doug Jones, but this contest is much bigger than the two men vying for the open seat. The campaign...

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A Newtown Family's Campaign To Change How We Think About Violence

This week marks five years since the mass shooting deaths of 20 young children and six educators at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn. One of those killed was 6-year-old Avielle Richman, who was shot in her first-grade classroom. Her parents, Jeremy Richman and Jennifer Hensel, plan to spend this year's anniversary day quietly, at home with the two children they had after Avielle's death. But as painful as Dec. 14 always is for them, Richman and Hensel say the roller coaster ride...

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Deadline Is Friday For Most ACA Insurance Sign-Ups, With Important Exceptions

Open enrollment on the federal health law's marketplace — HealthCare.gov — ends Friday, and most people who want a plan for next year need to meet the deadline. But some consumers who miss the cutoff could be surprised to learn they have the opportunity to enroll later. "While a lot of people will be eligible ... I am still worried that a lot of consumers won't know it," says Shelby Gonzales, a senior policy analyst at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Under the health law, people...

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After Court Ruling, Military Will Accept Openly Transgender Recruits As Of Jan. 1

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET Following a federal court ruling, the Pentagon has confirmed it will allow openly transgender individuals to enlist in the military beginning Jan. 1. The Trump administration had resisted that deadline in court, seeking to have its ban on new transgender troops reinstated — but on Monday, Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly upheld an earlier decision to temporarily block President Trump's ban. That ban has been under fire since it was issued in a presidential memorandum in...

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Parents Worry Congress Won't Fund The Children's Health Insurance Program

It's a beautiful morning in Pittsburgh, but Ariel Haughton is stressed out. She's worried her young children's health insurance coverage will soon lapse. "So, we're like a low-middle-class family, right?" she says. "I'm studying. My husband's working, and our insurance right now is 12 percent of our income — just for my husband and I. And it's not very good insurance either." The policy that covers the couple requires high fees to even see a doctor, and it has a high deductible for further...

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DOT Suspends Proposed Rule Requiring Airlines To Show Baggage Fee At Booking

The U.S. Department of Transportation released a statement last week announcing it would withdraw a proposed rule that would force airlines to disclose baggage and other fees at the time of ticket purchase. The decision to rescind the yet-to-be-enforced regulation from the Obama administration received heated responses from members of Congress and airline consumer rights organizations. The Obama administration proposed and drafted the rule (called a "rulemaking" in DOT language), but it was...

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Does Preschool Pay Off? Tulsa Says Yes

In 2001, not long after Oklahoma had adopted one of the nation's first universal pre-K programs, researchers from Georgetown University began tracking kids who came out of the program in Tulsa, documenting their academic progress over time.

In a new report published in the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management today, researchers were able to show that Tulsa's pre-K program has significant, positive effects on students' outcomes and well-being through middle school.

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Do You Consider Yourself A Robert Siegel Superfan? Tell Us About It.

NPR's All Things Considered is searching for Robert Siegel "superfans" to tell us what his career, and retirement, means to them. We want to know if you've been listening to him for decades, or just discovered him. If you don't know what you're going to do without him, or if he's helped you through particularly hard news, please share your memories with us. Your responses may be used in an upcoming story, on air or on NPR.org. A producer may reach out to you to follow up on your response, too...

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Amid Alabama's Special Election, Meet Birmingham's New Mayor

Randall Woodfin was sworn in as mayor of Birmingham, Alabama, at the end of November. At 36, hes the youngest person to be elected mayor in more than a century. Here & Now s Jeremy Hobson talks to Mayor Woodfin ( @WoodfinForBham ) about being a Democrat in a deeply Republican state and about Tuesdays special election. [Youtube] Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Could Probiotics Protect Kids From A Downside Of Antibiotics?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DTrENdWvvM It's a typical hectic morning at Michele Comisky's house in Vienna, Va., when she gets a knock on her front door. "Hi, how are you?" Comisky says as she greets Keisha Herbin Smith, a research assistant at Georgetown University. "Come on in." Comisky, 39, leads Herbin Smith into her kitchen. "Which one isn't feeling good?" asks Herbin Smith, glancing at Comisky's children. "That one," Comisky says, pointing to her 8-year-old son, Jackson. Jackson has...

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Thomas Fire, 5th-Largest In Modern California History, Shows Few Signs Of Slowing

Updated 10:40 p.m. ET Firefighters in California's Ventura and Santa Barbara counties find themselves still locked in a desperate struggle with what has become the fifth-largest wildfire in modern state history. The Thomas Fire , which for a time Sunday was ratcheted down just 10 percent contained, has ticked back upward to 20 percent containment. Late Monday, CalFire reported , "Gusty Santa Ana winds will continue to push fire to the west. Very high fuel loading, critically low fuel...

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The 50 Best Albums Of 2017

Consensus wasn't easy in 2017. Maybe that's because the news this year kept us on edge, our eyes and ears pointed in many directions. Maybe it's due to the growth of streaming as the dominant listening platform, one whose rules have not yet fully been written. Whatever the cause, with the exception of our No. 1 album, it felt like there were few pieces of music this year that captured our attention instantly and simultaneously. Instead, we spent our year tracking down new sounds that gave...

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Window Blind Cords Still Pose A Deadly Risk To Children

Andrea Sutton, a mom in Firestone, Colo., was trying to put her 3-year-old son Daniel down for a nap, but he wasn't having it. It was January, too cold for him to burn off much energy outside, and he was restless. She read him some books to settle him down and then left him to fall asleep.
She returned with her 4-year-old daughter a little while later to check on him. They found him hanging from the cord of the window blinds, wearing like a necklace the V-shaped strings above a wooden...

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Nikki Haley Says 'We Should All Be Willing To Listen' To Trump Accusers

Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., said on Sunday that women who have accused President Trump of sexual harassment and assault "should be heard." More than a dozen women came forward during the 2016 campaign with allegations of unwanted touching or kissing or other forms of sexual harassment. Haley addressed the allegations on CBS's Face the Nation, after discussing North Korea's missile tests and the plan to move the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. Haley told host John...

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Poll: Discrimination Against Women Is Common Across Races, Ethnicities, Identities

Discrimination in the form of sexual harassment has been in the headlines for weeks now, but new poll results being released by NPR show that other forms of discrimination against women are also pervasive in American society. The poll is a collaboration with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. For example, a majority (56 percent) of women believe that where they live, women are paid less than men for equal work. And roughly a third (31 percent...

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Terry Crews On His Sexual Assault Lawsuit: This Is About Accountability

Updated 7:00 p.m. ET: Actor and former NFL player Terry Crews filed a lawsuit last week stemming from an encounter at a party in 2016 when he says a high-powered Hollywood agent groped him. Crews tweeted about the assault in October, prompted by the women who came forward accusing Harvey Weinstein of sexual assault and harassment and the backlash they faced. "Once the Weinstein story broke, and these women were coming out and saying what he did, and I just kept hearing ... 'Oh boy, these...

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Listen to Morning Edition, weekdays from 5:00am to 9:00am & Weekend Edition, Saturday & Sunday from 8:00am to 10:00am on WPSU-FM.

NPR's Book Concierge: Our Guide To 2017's Great Reads

The Book Concierge is back and bigger than ever! Explore more than 350 standout titles picked by NPR staff and critics. Open the app now! Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

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Hear locally-hosted acoustic music on The Folk Show, Sunday nights from 10pm to midnight on WPSU-FM, and Saturdays from 1-5pm on WPSU 3 (to stream it, click LISTEN LIVE above, then select WPSU3).

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NPR One: An Award-Winning Cross-Platform Experience

Since launching NPR One in 2014, we've been working to deliver a news and storytelling experience that meets users in all the places they are now and will be in the future. For the Digital Media team, this has meant designing and building focused, yet flexible apps for smartphones, smart TVs, car infotainment systems, wearable devices, voice platforms, and more. That's why we were honored to learn that Google has named NPR One the winner of the 2017 Material Design Award for Platform...

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Reasons To Stay

In case you missed WPSU's Regional Murrow Award-winning series, "Reasons to Stay," which explores what keeps people in central Pa, check it out at the link below.

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Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it off your hands & turn it into great public radio on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.