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An archive recording of the WPSU Jazz Show as broadcast on Friday, September 23, 2016 and hosted by Greg Petersen. 

In the first hour hear tracks from Dexter Gordon, Donna Byrne, The Earl Klugh Trio, Gerry Mulligan, Helen Merrill with Stan Getz, Herbie Mann & Phil Woods, Jerry Gonzalez and more.

In the second hour, hear Kitty Margolis, The Marsalis Family, The Mills Brothers, Louis Armstrong & Oscar Peterson, The Monty Alexander Trio, The  Ron Affif Trio, Diana Krall and more.

Brooke Gladstone joins us from her studio at WNYC, where On The Media is produced, to help us make sense of the information environment we live in.  She’ll also talk about media bias—it turns out, there are lots of different kinds—and we’ll ponder the often-asked question: Did the media create the Trump candidacy?

If you are familiar with science writer Mary Roach, you know she is never one to shy away from parts of science that verge on the absurd. I read two of her previous books, and was enchanted by Roach's unique combination of endless curiosity and a wry sense of humor. So I rushed to lay my hands on her newest book, “Grunt: The Curious Science of Humans at War.” It will not fail to live up to her fans’ expectations. Even those who have never read her before will be hard-pressed to put down a book that I finished in a few short days.

Jill Stein in front of a "Green Party" banner.
Emily Reddy / WPSU

Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein visited Penn State Wednesday to ask for votes and volunteers.

She talked to an audience of about 200 about her support for environmental movements, Black Lives Matter and free public education. Stein rejected the idea that voting for a third party was throwing away a vote.

“I won’t sleep well if Donald Trump gets elected. And I won’t sleep well if Hillary Clinton gets elected,” Stein said. “But we live in a democracy. We have more than two deadly choices. We can stand up for the democracy that we need.”

Peter Buckland recounts his memories of the HUB Lawn Shooting for an oral history recording on September 16, 2016.
Erin Cassidy Hendrick / WPSU

September 17, 1996 is a painful date for many who were attending Penn State, including Peter Buckland. He said, “The community was , I would say, totally floored. I mean, I was.”

It was the day State College resident Jillian Robbins opened fire on the lawn of the HUB student union on the University Park campus, killing one student and wounding another.

Bloodshot Records

  

An archive recording of the WPSU Blues Show as broadcast on September 17, 2016 and hosted by Max Spiegel. 

In the first hour, hear The David Bromberg Band, Jackson Browne, The Black Keys. Roy Acuff, Frank Zappa, Rev. Gary Davis, Jack White, Barance Whitfield and The Savages, The Felice Brothers, Ry Cooder, and more.

In hour two, hear Johnny Cash, Beck, Will Weldon, Sleepy John Estes, Doc Watson, Dr. John, Leon Redbone, and more.

WPSU Jazz Archive - Sept. 16, 2016

Sep 17, 2016
Jan Persson / thejazzrecord.com

  

An archive recording for the WPSU Jazz show as aired on September 16, 2016 and hosted by Andrew Belmonte, featuring “Jazz From All Angles.”

In the first hour, hear performances by St Germain, Dizzy Gillespie, Jimmy Heath, Bela Fleck and The Flecktones, Larry Coryell, Buena Vista Social Club, Herbie Hancock, The Bad Plus, The David Murray Quartet and more.

In the second hour, hear Eric Dolphy, Dave Brubeck Quartet, iO String Quartet, Oliver Nelson, Phillip Glass, Charles Mingus, and more.

Republican Bob Inglis, a former South Carolina Congressman, lost his bid for reelection in 2010 for what many of his colleagues considered heresy: saying publicly that not only is climate change real, but that it's our duty to do something about it.  Slate magazine says his about-face on climate change makes him, "America's best hope for near-term climate action."  In 2012, Inglis launched the Energy and Enterprise Initiative, which promotes conservative and free-enterprise solutions--not subsidies and government regulations--to address climate change. 

In this Jan. 22, 2012 file photo, a woman pays her respects at a statue of former Penn State football coach Joe Paterno outside Beaver Stadium on the Penn State University campus after learning of his death in State College, Pa. Paterno was 85.
Gene J. Puskar / AP

Since the Sandusky scandal, Penn State hasn’t publicly commemorated former head football coach, Joe Paterno. That will change this Saturday at the matchup against Temple - and it’s reignited a debate about how and if Paterno should be recognized.

“We thought it was too soon, it was insensitive and just not the right time.”

Lauren Davis is the opinions editor at the Penn State student newspaper, The Daily Collegian. She recently wrote an editorial arguing against the tribute.

Mike Pence in front of crowd
Eleanor Klibanoff / WPSU

On a rainy Wednesday night, Republican Vice-Presidential candidate Mike Pence addressed about 400 fans at a trucking company outside Scranton.

 

Standing between two large Kenworth truck tractors, Mike Pence talked about industry and integrity. Pence said this election was about one thing, above all else:

 

“It’s about upholding the highest standard of integrity in the highest office in the land,” Pence said.

 

The crowd cheered when Pence talked about helping businesses.

 

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NPR Stories

Some say a new housing crisis is developing. Rising prices mean home ownership is now nearly impossible for young families saddled with student debt.

It’s a problem in places like Seattle and Denver, where there are a lot of college graduates as well as the fastest growing home prices.

Ben Markus from Here & Now contributor Colorado Public Radio explains.

Priscilla Chan and Mark Zuckerberg are smiling, standing in front of a backdrop emblazoned with the question: "Can we cure all diseases in our children's lifetime?" They're announcing a $3 billion initiative to achieve that goal, and they're calling it Chan Zuckerberg Science.

No sickness in the whole world by the time today's babies, like the couple's 9-month-old daughter Max Zuckerberg, are old folks?

Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump expanded his list of potential Supreme Court nominees Friday.

The new list consists of 10 more possible nominees, including a U.S. senator who has refused to endorse Trump.

Trump's additional list, coming just days before the first debate, suggests he wants to add diversity to his earlier all-white list of eight men and three women. The second list, like the first, consists of bedrock conservatives, many with records hostile to abortion rights, same-sex marriage, and federal regulations.

Movie remakes have not been setting the world on fire lately. The all-gal Ghostbusters will maybe break even. Ben-Hur and Tarzan each cost — and lost — a fortune. So what's Hollywood pushing this weekend? The Magnificent Seven, a remake of a remake — admittedly, one with a decent pedigree.

In Akira Kurosawa's Seven Samurai (1954), a pickup band of seven sword-wielding rōnin are hired by a Japanese farming village to protect it from bandits. Only three of them walked away at the end.

U.S. Native American tribes and Canadian First Nations are banding together to "collectively challenge and resist" proposals to build more pipelines from tar sands in Alberta, Canada. At least 50 First Nations and tribes signed a treaty on Thursday at ceremonies held in Vancouver and Montreal.

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Video Emerges From Scene Of Charlotte Police Shooting Of Keith Scott

As officials in Charlotte, N.C., consider when, if, and how to release video of the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott earlier this week, lawyers for the family have released what they say is eyewitness video taken by Scott's wife.On the cellphone footage that was first published by NBC, The New York Times, and other news outlets, Rakeyia Scott is heard pleading with her husband to be safe — and for the police not to shoot him. The video doesn't give a complete version of the encounter on...
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4 Questions Hillary Clinton Faces Heading Into The First Debate

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.1. What is her goal?Debate coaches say one of the biggest...
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4 Questions Donald Trump Faces Heading Into The First Debate

On Monday, Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton will face off in their first debate at Hofstra University in New York. In a race this close and with as many as 100 million people watching, the debates present both candidates with chances to seize momentum but potential pitfalls as well.Here are four things to think about as Donald Trump prepares for the debates. We also looked at four things to watch for Clinton.1. Can Trump exceed low expectations?In a year when voters are clearly ready for...
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Where Did National Forests Go? Green Spaces Disappear From Google Maps

If you looked at Google Maps this week, you might have noticed something strange: less green.Typically, mint green highlights designate publicly owned wild spaces on Google's maps. But as of this writing, some of those public lands have gone gray. The locations are still searchable, but if you don't already know the park or forest exists, and where exactly, you might not be able to find it.No green space is safe: Many of the missing parks are national forests, but some are state forests,...
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There's A 'Glaring' Gap In The War Against Poverty And Disease

It's almost a year to the day since world leaders committed to meeting 17 "Sustainable Development Goals" by 2030, from wiping out extreme poverty to fighting disease and inequality.Perhaps they should have added an 18th goal — compiling all the data needed to achieve the other goals.This data gap has been the talk among advocates for the poor this week as the U.N. General Assembly's current session got underway. It was at last year's General Assembly that the 17 goals were set.The only way...
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A Feel-Good Chess Movie Keeps Sentimentality In Check: 'Queen Of Katwe'

Back in 1988, Indian-American director Mira Nair burst onto the scene with her debut feature Salaam Bombay!, a ground-level portrait of Bombay street kids that brought the qualities of Italian neorealism — and its key successors, like Satyajit Ray's "Apu Trilogy" — to a nascent American independent scene. With her new film Queen of Katwe, Nair comes full circle, at least in the sense that she's again addressing the perils of extreme poverty and the resilient children who withstand it. The...
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Are We Reaching The End Of The Trend For Longer, Healthier Lives?

American lives have been getting steadily longer, and since the 1960s that trend has been driven mostly by a remarkable reduction in heart disease. But those improvements have slowed dramatically. Scientists are now wondering whether we're approaching the end of the trend of longer, healthier lives.That's because the steady decline in heart disease is fading.Most people alive today don't remember the days when many people in their 40s and 50s would simply drop dead of a heart attack. But 79...
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James Horner's Posthumous Works Tell A Story Of His Life

Tomorrow, two final works from composer James Horner will reach American ears: a concert piece being released on CD, and his score for the remake of the Western adventure The Magnificent Seven. The composer died a little more than a year ago in a plane crash, after creating more than 100 film scores over nearly 40 years.Horner's score for Titanic is one of the best-selling orchestral soundtracks of all time. He won an Oscar for that score and another for the film's theme song, Celine Dion's ...
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A Web Of Trees And Their 'Hidden' Lives

When I was a boy, I had a book about a father who sends his child to bed without dinner because he won't remove his tall hat at the table.The boy goes to sleep hungry and dreams that he is in a forest where the trees are threatened by an evil lumberjack. One of the endangered trees turns out to be the boy's father. In the illustrations, you can see the father's tears in the gnarly bark of the tree.I can't remember the title and I haven't been able to track this book down. I've asked book...
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Can Pigeons Spell? New Study Suggests They Can Recognize Words

Take a look at this video:If a word is spelled correctly, the pigeon has been taught to peck at the word. If it's spelled incorrectly, the pigeon is supposed to peck at the star. When it gets it right, the machine hands it some food.A group of researchers from New Zealand were able to train four pigeons to consistently — with 70 percent accuracy — recognize dozens of words. The smartest pigeon learned about 60 words that it could distinguish from about 1,000 nonwords.Their study is published...
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'He Will Be Our Brother': Boy, 6, Asks Obama To Bring Syrian Boy To Live With Him

The breathtaking sadness of seeing a boy suffering amid Syria's civil war has prompted a breathtaking offer of hospitality and kindness.The sight of shell-shocked 5-year-old Omran Daqneesh, who was wounded in an airstrike in Aleppo, left many people speechless last month. It also prompted a New York boy named Alex to write to President Obama with a simple request: "Can you please go get him" so Omran can become part of Alex's family?The generous offer from Alex, 6, is now tugging at...
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NPR Special Coverage: The Presidential Debate

WPSU will bring you NPR's live, special coverage and analysis of the four presidential and vice-presidential debates. Hear the first presidential debate Monday night at 9:00 on WPSU-FM.

Deadline to register to vote for the general election is October 11. Find out how to register, learn about offices up for election, and find other valuable voter resources by visiting wpsu.org/vote16.

It's Folk Season

Now that the Metropolitain Opera radio season has ended, The Folk Show is back on WPSU-FM Saturday afternoons from 1-5pm, now through the end of November.

Public Radio for Central & Northern Pennsylvania

Hear WPSU-FM on the radio at the frequencies listed above, or stream WPSU-FM and our two HD channels right here by clicking the LISTEN LIVE button.

Keystone Crossroads: Rust or Revival? explores the urgent challenges pressing upon Pennsylvania's cities. WPSU is a contributing station.

WPSU's Community Calendar

Find out what's happening in Central & Northern PA on WPSU's Community Calendar! Submit your group's event at least 2 weeks in advance, and you might hear it announced on WPSU-FM.

Reasons To Stay

WPSU's series "Reasons to Stay" explores what keeps people in central Pa. On the radio during Morning Edition, and on our multi-media website.

On-Air Schedule

Turn Your Old Clunker into Public Radio

Got an old car? The Car Talk Vehicle Donation Program will take it, and turn it into great public radio programs on WPSU-FM. To donate your car, visit the link below or call 1-866-789-8627. Thanks!

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WPSU's Local Food Journey

Our Local Food Journey blog explores what it means to eat local in Central and Northern Pennsylvania.